cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Oct, 2008 06:28 am
@gungasnake,
I resemble that remark!

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/showtracker/images/2007/07/25/cavemen1.jpg
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Oct, 2008 06:31 am
@cjhsa,
We always suspected this about you, cj. But thanx for the graphic evidence.
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Oct, 2008 06:37 am
@Merry Andrew,
Care for a game of tennis?
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Oct, 2008 07:44 am
BTW....

Neither the Irish nor anybody else alive today is related to neanderthals in any way, shape, or manner whatsoever. If the Irish are messed up, it's for other reasons.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Oct, 2008 08:14 am
@gungasnake,
gungasnake wrote:

BTW....

Neither the Irish nor anybody else alive today is related to neanderthals in any way, shape, or manner whatsoever. If the Irish are messed up, it's for other reasons.

That's quite simple: no-one from Neanderthal immigrated to Ireland. Very Happy

(But they could have done so: the railway station in Neanderthal opened in 1879 ....)
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Oct, 2008 08:25 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

gungasnake wrote:

BTW....

Neither the Irish nor anybody else alive today is related to neanderthals in any way, shape, or manner whatsoever. If the Irish are messed up, it's for other reasons.

That's quite simple: no-one from Neanderthal immigrated to Ireland. Very Happy

(But they could have done so: the railway station in Neanderthal opened in 1879 ....)


Some days it's just not worth chewing through the leather straps.

0 Replies
 
Mr Stillwater
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Oct, 2008 02:26 am
Ok - the evidence seems to suggest that the Neanderthal 'homelands' disappeared and their last outpost was Gibralter. This would indicate that the climate in Europe became too hostile for even a very well adapted hominid - talking Ice Age here folks.

If they had attempted to break out via the Middle East (an area that they shared with Modern Homo) they would have found that those areas were already occupied and the hunting strategies they successfully used in Middle Europe would not work there. With walls of ice pushing in from the North, the Eastern areas denied to them, no ability to take up a Mediterranean strategy in the South, it is obvious that the last place they could practice being Neanderthalish would be the last part of Europe available to them. Kinda sad, however there would have been no way of splitting the planet between one advanced human and another.
Mr Stillwater
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Oct, 2008 02:27 am
And no, Oireland would NOT have been a possibility.

To be sure, to be sure.....
0 Replies
 
Blickers
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Oct, 2008 10:47 pm
@Mr Stillwater,
Quote:
With walls of ice pushing in from the North, the Eastern areas denied to them, no ability to take up a Mediterranean strategy in the South, it is obvious that the last place they could practice being Neanderthalish would be the last part of Europe available to them.


I am not sure I understand this. I thought the Neanderthal was adapted to the Ice Age, and lost out to Cro-Magnon when the Ice Age receded and Cro-Magnon moved up from Africa.
Mr Stillwater
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Oct, 2008 04:02 am
@Blickers,
Quote:
I am not sure I understand this. I thought the Neanderthal was adapted to the Ice Age, and lost out to Cro-Magnon when the Ice Age receded and Cro-Magnon moved up from Africa.


Half the picture. The Pleistocene is the period of time that encompasses the rise and spread of modern homo. It is one characterised by repeated glacial 'events' where around 30% of the landmass of the world was covered in ice. The fall-out of this is two-fold:
1. The ice was created and held by a severe reduction in rainfall - water was effectively held in 'ice-storage'
2. The areas not in the cold-freeze were opened up in the tropics - perfect for the variety of human we are, but deadly for H. Neanderthalis.

Our species is a creature of the hot areas, the first 'beach-combers' landed in Australia way before the colonisation of Asia or the Americas. Europe was the last continent to be colonised by modern homo, even though it is one o f the closest to Africa. We wandered out of Africa with a predisposition to hot climates and the Ice-Ages opened up more and more of those tropical climes as the water receded and covered the areas that Neanderthals preferred.

This would effectively split the Alps into two zones with modern Northern Italy as the divide. As I pointed out - to move away from the 'homelands' to the East would involve competing with other humans. The move to the West (Gibralter) buys time, but leaves them so isolated that they are locked into a dead end.
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Oct, 2008 08:23 am
@Mr Stillwater,
Well, why the hell didn't they just cross the Atlantic? Lazy cave men...
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

New Propulsion, the "EM Drive" - Question by TomTomBinks
The Science Thread - Discussion by Wilso
Why do people deny evolution? - Question by JimmyJ
Are we alone in the universe? - Discussion by Jpsy
Fake Science Journals - Discussion by rosborne979
Controvertial "Proof" of Multiverse! - Discussion by littlek
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Neanderthals
  3. » Page 2
Copyright © 2022 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 01/29/2022 at 07:46:44