Reply Sat 4 Oct, 2008 11:43 pm
The National Geographic had a feature on Neanderthals with model created from bones taken from various sites to form a complete specimen. It was of a Neanderthal heavy-set woman. Their build was perfect for the cold regions they occupied. As the earth became warmer creatures with smaller body mass had an edge. It is possible that mammoths died from over hunting or that the vegetation changed and with their heavy coats could not stand the heat and died from overheating. The thick set Neanderthals could have suffered from heart attacks and lack of food as mammoths died out. They were probably too heavy and slow to hunt the faster warm climate deer and compete with slender humans who began to encroach into their territories.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 8 • Views: 2,446 • Replies: 30
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dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2008 01:41 am
@talk72000,
url?
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2008 05:19 am
@dlowan,
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/featurehub
0 Replies
 
Mr Stillwater
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2008 04:27 pm
There was also an article in another Nat Geo last year with a reconstruction of a Neanderthal child. It had a very spooky resemblance to my neice...
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2008 04:45 pm
@Mr Stillwater,
So the family's evolving, eh stilly?
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2008 05:14 pm
@talk72000,
Thanks for posting this - fascinating.
0 Replies
 
Mr Stillwater
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2008 05:38 pm
@patiodog,
Quote:
Re: Mr Stillwater (Post 3426577)
So the family's evolving, eh stilly?


Fightin' words p-dog!
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2008 05:45 am
@Mr Stillwater,
Come and get me, Pondo!









Seriously, come on over. Things are getting a little dull up here.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2008 06:03 am
@patiodog,
patiodog wrote:

Come and get me, Pondo!









Seriously, come on over. Things are getting a little dull up here.


You're a pair of boooooots...he'll chew you up and spit you out.
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2008 06:38 am
@dlowan,
I suppose that's true. Compared to your cuisine, I must look pretty damn tasty.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2008 06:52 am
@patiodog,
patiodog wrote:

I suppose that's true. Compared to your cuisine, I must look pretty damn tasty.


Yep...food here is awful:

Cheong Liew`s

Edible Harmony

Tenth Anniversary Tasting Menu



The Four Dances of the Sea

Soused snook, raw calamari and black noodles, octopus aioli and spiced prawn sushi

`04 Alan & Veitch Viognier




Crisp Queensland soft shell crab

`04 Mesh ‘Eden Valley’ Riesling





Chicken liver and mousse ravioli with creamy crab and lentil broth

`03 Ashton Hills Chardonnay





Steamed Kunsei of salmon with braised leeks and pacific oyster

`04 Castagna Allegro




Roasted Pheasant breast, coconut cabbage, pheasant leg sausage and endive fondue

`01 R.B.J. ‘Theologicum’ Mourvedre Grenache




Spiced Wagyu beef, anchovy salsa, stuffed mushroom and baby root vegetables

`03 Paracombe ‘Adelaide Hills’ Cabernet Franc




Warm layers of gorgonzola and marscapone with macerated dates and witlof salad

`01 Château du Pavillon St. Croix du Mont




Pear and basil cream, ginger toffee, Galiano almond milk with grass jelly,
azuki beans and tapioca pearl

`04 Alasia Moscato d’Asti

patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2008 05:20 pm
@dlowan,
What a defensive invasive wabbit you are.




You know, there's excellent food in England now, too. Doesn't mean they can't be ridiculed for crimes past. Not sure how Marmite stacks up against Vegemite, though, never having tasted the former...
Mr Stillwater
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2008 06:42 pm
@dlowan,
Quote:
Soused snook


A favourite, eh?
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2008 07:28 pm
@patiodog,
patiodog wrote:

What a defensive invasive wabbit you are.




You know, there's excellent food in England now, too. Doesn't mean they can't be ridiculed for crimes past. Not sure how Marmite stacks up against Vegemite, though, never having tasted the former...


Marmite's worser.
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2008 07:32 pm
@dlowan,
Funny, my eyes looked up the page for a sec and saw "Vagemite." Would play to a niche market at best, methinks...
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Oct, 2008 10:46 pm
@patiodog,
patiodog wrote:

Funny, my eyes looked up the page for a sec and saw "Vagemite." Would play to a niche market at best, methinks...


Ok...that damn parasite thread has me all skeert.

We have MITES in our VAGINAS?


You know, I read that entire neanderthal article, and it IS damned interesting.

The Neanderthal woman looked very Irish to me (I'm allowed to say that because I have a lot of Irish in my ancestry.)

It's sad to think of all those people cannibalized. The work being done on the teeth (to see how fast neanderthal kids matured) and the speculation that their faster maturation limited the development time the social/cultural parts of their brains had is fascinating.

So is what the dentition people said as an aside...that the trauma of birth shows up in the lines of development in our teeth!
Mr Stillwater
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Oct, 2008 12:14 am
@dlowan,
Quote:
I have a lot of Irish in my ancestry


<Mmmppphhhh, mmphhhh.. barely keeping it in>
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Oct, 2008 01:51 am
@Mr Stillwater,
Mr Stillwater wrote:

Quote:
I have a lot of Irish in my ancestry


<Mmmppphhhh, mmphhhh.. barely keeping it in>


Just keep trying, dear.



That really IS an interesting article, you know.


I am at least as guilty as anyone of distracting from it, but it's be fun to discuss it more.


0 Replies
 
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Oct, 2008 06:05 am
Quote:
"When I was young, I thought that teeth were not so useful in assessing recent human evolution, but now I think they are the most important thing," said Jean-Jacques Hublin, who had accompanied his Max Planck Institute colleague Tanya Smith to Grenoble.


HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!! We all have this realization at some point, don't we?
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Oct, 2008 06:23 am
For anybody who might have missed it....

Our present races represent (very minor) subspecies differences; the neanderthal was a different SPECIES. There is zero evidence on the planet of any crossbreeding between humans and neanderthals despite the two groups living in close proximity for long periods of time and neanderthal DNA is described as about halfway between ours and that of a chimpanzee.

This rules the neanderthal out as a plausible human ancestor since the genetic gap was simply too wide, and all other hominids were FURTHER removed from us than the neanderthal. That leaves nothing on this planet from which modern man could be descended via any process resembling evolution.

You'd need some new hominid, closer to us both in time and morphology, and the works and remains of such a creature would be all over the map and very easy to find had he ever existed.
 

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