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The Large Hadron Collider - Court rejects protest against Big Bang machine

 
 
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 02:49 pm
The world’s largest physics experiment, the Large Hadron Collider, is expected to be launched as planned in Geneva, despite new concerns being raised over its safety, according to the European Organisation for Nuclear Research, CERN. It follows news that a lawsuit has been filed in the European Court of Human Rights. The scientists behind the latest allegations say they remain concerned over claims the experiment could create black holes which might swallow up the earth. They say there are not enough guarantees that the experiments planned at CERN will be safe. CERN, however, says there is nothing new in the scientists’ claims and the organisation is still planning to launch the experiment on 10th September. (via WorldRadioSwitzerland, Geneva)


But meanwhile:

Quote:
August 29, 2008 - 4:19 PM
Court rejects protest against Big Bang machine

The European Court of Human Rights has rejected a complaint against the planned launch of the world's most powerful particle accelerator near the Swiss-French border.

Opponents, including the German biochemist Otto Rössler, tried to block the experiment due to begin on September 10, saying it would result in black holes that could suck up the Earth.

The European Organization for Nuclear Research (Cern) welcomed the court ruling on Friday. It dismisses accusations that the experiment is irresponsible and risky.

The court is still to decide on allegations that the experiment with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) violates the right to life.

The machine, housed in a circular tunnel near Geneva, will try to recreate conditions just after the so-called Big Bang - the presumed birth of the universe.


Source: Swissinfo - http://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/news_digest/Court_rejects_protest_against_Big_Bang_machine.html?siteSect=104&sid=9629335&cKey=1220024587000&ty=nd



Some more infos:
The LHC (Large Hadron Collider): http://www.lhc.ac.uk/

CERN, the world's largest particle physics laboratory: http://public.web.cern.ch/Public/Welcome.html

The Guardian: The experiment of a lifetime - http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2008/aug/29/research.cern

Photos of the Large Hadron Collider: http://www.electronicsinfoline.com/New/Science/photos-of-the-large-hadron-collider.html
--------------------------
"LHC Defense": http://www.lhcdefense.org/
"LHC Facts": http://www.lhcfacts.org/
--------------------------

 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 09:07 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
I thought this was already settled. September 10th, eh? I will be watching with great interest.
JTT
 
  2  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 09:17 pm
@edgarblythe,
Only for an infinitesimal split second, Edgar. Smile
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 09:19 pm
@JTT,
Perhaps. (smiley)
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Sep, 2008 03:17 pm
Quote:
From The Times

September 4, 2008
Journey back to the beginning of time is nearly complete
Frank Close: Commentary

At the beginning of the 20th century, science could explain almost all physical phenomena then known. Isaac Newton’s laws of mechanics described the heavens; the Industrial Revolution both inspired and was driven by thermodynamics; and Maxwell’s theory of electromagnetic waves explained light. The atomic nucleus, relativity and quantum mechanics were not yet in the lexicon, but soon would change everything.

As the 21st century begins, a similar story might be told " of far-reaching theories with tantalising implications, and of ambitious experiments with the potential for discoveries beyond our present imaginings.

Long ago Galileo looked into the heavens and saw their wonder. Modern telescopes explore deeper into space " and back in time, because it takes time for light to get here; look far enough and you are peering towards the start of time. Which inspires the question: could we look into the big bang and witness the act of creation itself?

We cannot do so with ordinary telescopes because the whole Universe then was hotter, and brighter, than the Sun is now: we would be blinded by the light. However, we can recreate those extreme conditions, for brief moments in regions smaller than atoms, and with special detectors learn how things came to be.

Twenty years ago CERN began to show what the Universe was like when a billionth of a second old. Trying to reach time zero is like finding the end of the rainbow, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will take us ten to a hundred times farther than before.

Things evolved very fast back then. Our theories imply that within a billionth of a second the seeds of our Universe had been sown. And by opening a window on the conditions that existed then, the LHC may answer many of the questions about the nature of things that physicists have yet to resolve.

Whereas relativity and quantum mechanics, the pillars of theoretical physics, work in a Universe where mass and gravity can be ignored, they are incompatible in the first moments of time when gravity was overwhelming.

We see hints of a unified theory, but what it is and how the structures that led to the particles and forces that moulded us are still perceived only vaguely.

Why are there three spatial dimensions; could there be more? If dimensions beyond our ken are revealed at the LHC this would be one of the greatest cultural shocks of all. Our theories work if everything is massless and flits around at the speed of light, yet if it were so we could not be here. How did mass emerge; what indeed is it?

We know how the seeds of normal matter emerged in the relatively cool afterglow of creation. However, it appears that “normal” matter is but 1 per cent of the whole; we are but flotsam on a sea of “dark matter”, whose existence has been inferred from theoretical cosmology but remains undetected. What that dark sea consists of, how it was formed, why there is any matter at all rather than a hellish ferment of radiation, are unknown.

After that first billionth of a second, the material particles from which we are made, and the disparate forces that act on them, had become encoded into the fabric of the Universe. The events that led our Universe to win the lottery of life were decided earlier than this. Some of them we believe occurred in the epoch now within reach.

That is what the LHC promises to reveal. It will bring into sharp focus what are currently but vague shadows of possibility. What actually took place in that long-ago dawn, only nature knows. Soon humans will too.

Frank Close is Professor of Physics at the University of Oxford, and author of The Void (Oxford University Press)

edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Sep, 2008 03:42 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
I don't have the brain power or the education to understand all that this implies, but I eagerly await the discoveries.
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sun 7 Sep, 2008 08:21 pm
@edgarblythe,
Giving the thread a bump, because, I believe, the collider kicks off Wednsday.
spendius
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 8 Sep, 2008 02:08 pm
This might be worth a go if you can get it.

Google "BBC i-player". In their search box type Big Bang LHC Geneva and there's a nice 60 minute film, tastefully shot and with plenty of fireworks. I've seen it three times. It gets dafter each time.
0 Replies
 
Gargamel
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Sep, 2008 02:54 pm
Another opporunity to use my, "Hey, baby, since it's the end of the world and all.." pickup line!

Terrific!
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  2  
Reply Mon 8 Sep, 2008 05:11 pm
I've never really gotten the doomsday worries. If the world ends in a way that is nearly instantaneous, painless and hassleless - why care? If we're gone, we're gone.

Hmmm.... edit.... I say that from a single-person with no kids point of view.
old europe
 
  3  
Reply Mon 8 Sep, 2008 05:15 pm
@littlek,
littlek wrote:
Hmmm.... edit.... I say that from a single-person with no kids point of view.


What would be different if you were married and had kids?
spendius
 
  2  
Reply Mon 8 Sep, 2008 05:48 pm
@old europe,
I wouldn't try to answer that if I was you littlek.
old europe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Sep, 2008 05:58 pm
@spendius,
I wouldn't ask littlek something like that if I knew that you'd be listening, spendi....
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2008 12:01 am
@edgarblythe,
Thanks, edgar - meanwhile, some other threads about this were posted as well.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Wed 10 Sep, 2008 01:39 am
The big day has finally arrived.

Day of reckoning for Cern's mammoth machine
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Wed 10 Sep, 2008 05:13 am
@Walter Hinteler,
They've turned the sucker on. Come on, protons. Let's see what you've got.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Sep, 2008 05:16 am
@edgarblythe,
The start went well as thought ...
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Sep, 2008 06:26 am
Still here, the world didn"t end afterall.
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  2  
Reply Wed 10 Sep, 2008 08:47 am
Bugger.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Sep, 2008 05:01 pm
@nimh,
I thought the end would come with the actual colliding of protons, rather than a test run or two.
0 Replies
 
 

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