30
   

Your favourite game of all time.....

 
 
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Wed 23 Sep, 2009 12:28 pm
@murielle,
I have many, many years of video gaming experience. I've played Video Games on the following platforms:
Atari;
TRS-80;
Sega Genesis;
Nintendo (Super Nes);
Playstation 1 + 2;

My favorite platform still is the ever evolving PC and here is an off the top of my head list of favorite PC games:
1. Half Life 2;
2. Half Life;
3. Thief;
4. Sims 2;
5. Portal (from the Orange Box of course);
6. Alone in the Dark (the original);
7. Unreal.
8. Sims;
9. Chris Crawford's Balance of Power;
10. Loderunner,
11. Boulderdash;
12. Archon;
13. Gunship;
14. Wolfenstein 3d;
15. Tetris;
16. Zork.
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Wed 23 Sep, 2009 12:32 pm
Civilization and Football manager games (of which there are several titles) always took up the most of my gaming time.

Right now, I'm having a gaming Renaissance on the iPhone (on which Civilization is again my favorite title) after years of not playing at all. It's the most fun I've had in gaming since I was a kid.
0 Replies
 
mm25075
 
  1  
Wed 23 Sep, 2009 05:02 pm
I have to say I love a lot of simulation/world type games and have recently started enjoying RPG type games. One I keep going back to a lot is Roller Coaster Tycoon and it's various add ons. For some reason I just love designing new parks and being able to be creative with the themes.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Thu 24 Sep, 2009 02:49 pm
@mm25075,
Can you torture your virtual theme park clientele by blocking all of the park's restrooms or removing them from the park or designing roller coasters that are too extreme? Inquiring minds need to know!
Linkat
 
  1  
Thu 24 Sep, 2009 03:01 pm
I love this arcade game on webkinz - Eager Beaver Adventure Park

I've completed the entire game and won tropheys for both my daughters' little creatures.
0 Replies
 
mm25075
 
  1  
Thu 24 Sep, 2009 04:18 pm
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:

Can you torture your virtual theme park clientele by blocking all of the park's restrooms or removing them from the park or designing roller coasters that are too extreme? Inquiring minds need to know!


Oh yes oh yes! You can create your own roller coasters and test them. You can remove parts of the track so the roller coaster cars crash and burn with the little people on them. Hehe. If you don't hire enough handymen to keep the park clean, the bathrooms get all stinky and then people begin pukeing all over. Of course they cause your park's popularity to decrease thus you lose profits but it's high satisfying especially since you can save it whenever you want Very Happy

Zoo tycoon was pretty fun too (same sort of idea) I think I had too much fun removing a piece of fence from the big cat enclosures. :evil grin: The kitties would run out and grab people and shake them about. Nothing like watching all of the peeps run out of the zoo in horror.
tengkujeziraj
 
  1  
Sun 11 Oct, 2009 08:09 pm
@Josheva,
Same here bro, I love the games so much, so damn good, try the unofficial expansion The Darkest Hour.

Anyway Bioware is no longer n business, it was defund already.

I keep waiting for a games similiar to the Baldur's gate series but there were none in existing.........
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Fri 30 Oct, 2009 08:19 pm
@mm25075,
mm25075 wrote:

:evil grin: The kitties would run out and grab people and shake them about. Nothing like watching all of the peeps run out of the zoo in horror.

My kind of gamer! Wink I used to torture my sims characters I didn't like when I ... muahaahaahaa
mwahaahaahaa
mooooohaahaahaa!
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Fri 30 Oct, 2009 08:21 pm

Has anyone played Sims 3? I want to see if it's worth it. I loved playing Sims and Sims 2[/v]. Very Happy
mm25075
 
  1  
Sat 31 Oct, 2009 12:47 am
@tsarstepan,
I have Sims 3. Very much the same as Sims 1 with the Hot Date Expansion where you can go to the town and visit other neighbors. The biggest difference I noticed is that you can only have one toon lot active at a time. So if you like having several different 'built up' toons, it's not like Sims 1 where you could level them up indpendently of each other.

It has some additional stuff to go along with differing personalities but I didn't enjoy it as much as I thought I would. :/ I went back to playing Sims 1 so I could continue to use all the special funiture and stuff I got over the years. Especially the magic shower thingie that brought all the stats up to 10 when they'd take a shower.

tsarstepan
 
  1  
Sat 31 Oct, 2009 12:58 am
@mm25075,
Yeah. That was my biggest complaint with the Sims 2, the loss of the truly customizable furniture. And I remember the cheat worthy furniture. Jerry rigged coffee machines and the like. Wink
mm25075
 
  2  
Sat 31 Oct, 2009 01:01 am
@tsarstepan,
And the special art piece. Wink Buy it for $750. Wait for it to appreciate the next day...sell it for $22,000. Sure beats typing cheat codes for $$$.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Sat 31 Oct, 2009 01:11 am
@mm25075,
I had the grand piano that did pretty much the same.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Sat 31 Oct, 2009 01:33 am
@tsarstepan,
Are you....er....a little weird?


Shocked
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Sat 31 Oct, 2009 01:53 am
@dlowan,
I don't suppose you ever played The Sims? Users took the the virtual furniture from the game and rigged the programming so when the characters used ... say the rigged bed, they'd get more energy from their sleep.

Essentially it was cheating.

And no. I am slightly more then a little weird, thank you very much. Razz
dlowan
 
  1  
Sat 31 Oct, 2009 03:34 am
@tsarstepan,
Lol!!!


Well, I guessed you were oddish....not that there's anything wrong with that.


I confess, I have never simmed.






0 Replies
 
vinsan
 
  2  
Wed 18 Nov, 2009 03:48 am
@tsarstepan,
Luv HALF LIFE 2

Amazing AI and Graphics... physics model
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Wed 18 Nov, 2009 12:01 pm
@vinsan,
And I can't wait until the Episode 3 comes out!
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Wed 9 Dec, 2009 02:39 am
The 15 best videogames of the ’00s
http://www.avclub.com/articles/the-15-best-videogames-of-the-00s,35642/

The AV Club's list (not mine):

Quote:
5. Portal (Valve, 2007)
The legend of Portal starts with a fledgling team of still-in-school gamemakers who pitched a concept to Valve’s Gabe Newell, walked away with a deal, and eventually delivered a masterpiece. Their brilliant portal mechanic and the extensive playtesting that perfected the puzzles made this an excellent game. But credit also goes to Valve for what they brought to the table: a writing team that stitched the levels together with hilarious but meaningful dialogue; one of the decade’s best villains, the complex, conflicted GLaDOS; the subtle integration into the wider Half-Life universe; and the fact that GLaDOS not only eludes you at the end, but comes back and sings you a farewell, penned by geek troubadour Jonathan Coulton. Who thinks of something like that? Valve, that’s who. With Portal, the company proved itself as adept at spotting talent and creating pop culture as it is at shipping great games.
4. Rock Band (MTV Games/Electronic Arts, 2007)
Rhythm games have frequently courted non-gamers"what better hook to reel in newbies than catchy tunes?"but none dominates a party like Rock Band. The four-player experience accommodates precise, determined players and drunken fools all in the same session. What other party game can satisfy all of the people all of the time? It was made by musicians for everyone; its devotion to music is evident in song selections that skirt the mainstream and animations that replicate onstage performance as lovingly as Madden seeks to mirror football. Where prior music games were limited by static disc-based releases, a constant supply of optional downloadable content makes Rock Band the only music game that persistently thinks beyond the boundaries of physical releases. That keeps it fresh and, not coincidentally, makes the title a bright light in the increasingly shadowy music biz.
3. Fallout 3 (Bethesda Softworks, 2008)
Some games have great storylines; some have great worlds. Bethesda Softworks’ update of the Fallout series is a world-building triumph. The Capital Wasteland is more than a massive chunk of irradiated real estate; it’s home to characters of every conceivable stripe, odd relics of a bygone civilization, and mutated new inhabitants that suggest evolution isn’t a process to be rushed. Fallout 3’s crowning achievement is structuring the Wasteland as a framework in which players can pick and choose how they’ll combine those ingredients to tell their own story. Is the Wasteland the basis for a traditional Western, a cautionary Mad Max tale, or a balls-out action saga? It can be all of the above, and much more. The measure of a game should never be a bottom-line summation of playable time, but the fact that Fallout 3 offers easily a hundred hours of post-apocalyptic storytelling can’t be overlooked.
2. Katamari Damacy (Namco, 2004)
Indie games existed long before 2004, but there’s a good argument for pegging Katamari Damacy as the catalyst that helped usher in the new wave of low-fi, handmade games. Of course, Keita Takahashi’s quirky game wasn’t independently made. He tricked his bosses at Japanese publisher Namco into letting him make an oddball game about rolling all the detritus of consumer culture into a huge ball, then launching it into space. And in doing so, he cemented all the themes that would define the independent spirit of gaming: a quirky tone, experimental mechanics, twee art, and cooler-than-thou music. Which together make Katamari Damacy a pure delight"a surrealistic, totally original confection with a nihilistic subtext.
1. BioShock (2K Games, 2007)
A three-word pleasantry"“Would you kindly?”"set up the most stunning plot twist in gaming history and made BioShock a lasting icon. Many games have stolen its moral-choice device"witness the recent glut of “Press A to kill, B to rescue” situations"but the copycats miss the real insight of the “Would you kindly?” moment, which showed players that the notion of choice in a game is just an illusion anyway. It’s all in how you execute the illusion, and BioShock uses every tool of the medium to tell its story of extreme libertarianism gone awry: richly characterized dialogue, the gloom of a crumbling Atlantis, the limitations of the first-person viewpoint. It was a visionary effort, one that set the bar high for games that would follow"especially the upcoming BioShock 2.
0 Replies
 
mm25075
 
  1  
Fri 8 Jan, 2010 11:42 am
I just got the Dragon Age; Origins game and have to say I really love the immersiveness of the storyline so far. It's a single player RPG game that uses a series of modules and movie bits to take the player through an interactive world that adjusts itself based on the players choices. It's a lot like Baldur's Gate in that you have a group of up to four characters that you can control during battle scenes.

Techinically- it's a bit rough on the 'running/walking' aspect but overall seems ok. I'm hoping to find a patch that will address those issues as I found myself getting quite frustrated with that aspect of it at times.

I've had a couple of issues with running the program but a restart of my laptop seemed to fix the problem at least for now.
 

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