ossobuco
 
  1  
Fri 22 Feb, 2008 12:27 am
and the italian battuto usually involves sauteeing onions, carrots, celery, followed or interceded by garlic... before anything else at all.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Fri 22 Feb, 2008 03:37 am
usually I would add the carrots as small babies , and when they are done screaming , let them simmer with the whole soup. Carrots and cloves add a dimension .

I think Im asking for complexity, Im so tired of most Jewish or Chinese style chicken soup, salt , chicken, grease, pepper and onions, Bleechh
0 Replies
 
alex240101
 
  1  
Fri 22 Feb, 2008 07:12 am
Good day farmerman.
Growing up my mom would make the traditional chicken noodle soup, and then add extra gizzards and neckbones, to make it gizzard chicken noodle neck soup, or she'd add extra wide egg noodles to make it chicken noodle noodle soup.
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Fri 22 Feb, 2008 08:15 pm
alex240101 wrote:
Good day farmerman.
Growing up my mom would make the traditional chicken noodle soup, and then add extra gizzards and neckbones, to make it gizzard chicken noodle neck soup, or she'd add extra wide egg noodles to make it chicken noodle noodle soup.


If you made the soup from a rooster it could be cocka noodle soup
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Fri 22 Feb, 2008 08:16 pm
Re: CHOKING THE CHICKEN
farmerman wrote:
I am looking for some really good chicken soup recipes that involve the use of an elederly (henopausal) chicken that has stopped laying and must be made an example of.\

I thank you in advance


Henopausal? You slay me!

Choking the chicken?

Cock-a-noodle?

Now this is funnier than Comedy channel!
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Fri 22 Feb, 2008 08:31 pm
Re: CHOKING THE CHICKEN
farmerman wrote:
I am looking for some really good chicken soup recipes that involve the use of an elederly (henopausal) chicken that has stopped laying and must be made an example of.\

I thank you in advance


Farmer

I can understand you wanting to make soup with a chicken you've never known personally, but ...

....to treat this poor creature (who has no doubt served you more than well in her youth!) in this heartless way, simply because she's henopausal, is most unjust!

Shame!

Instead, may I suggest a dignified retirement, enjoying the the sun, the meadows, the daffodils by day .... & a warm, fluffy nest, far from marauding foxes at night. Very Happy

It's the least you can do!
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Fri 22 Feb, 2008 08:48 pm
farmerman wrote:
I think Im asking for complexity, Im so tired of most Jewish or Chinese style chicken soup, salt , chicken, grease, pepper and onions, Bleechh


Put a tablespoon horseradish in the soup and you'll have a different
taste - very good too!

Have you tried Greek chicken soup? It's delicious.

Quote:
1(2-3 lb.) chicken
1/2 c. rice
1 lg. onion
1-2 celery
1-2 carrots
Salt and pepper to taste
2 eggs, room temperature
1 lemon

Bring chicken, onion, celery, and carrots to boil in pot with water just covering the chicken. After it has boiled, strain the broth into another pot so the liquid is clear. Add 1/2 cup rice and simmer until done (1/2 hour). When soup is done you can add chopped chicken pieces, chopped carrots, and celery (from the boiling).

Take pot off fire.

In three separate bowls: Put in one the egg yolks of the two eggs. Put in another the egg whites. Put in the third the juice of one lemon.

With a hand mixer, whip the egg whites until frothy. With a fork beat egg yolks. Pour egg yolks slowly into beaten egg whites and fold into mixture. When all yolks are in egg white pour slowly the lemon juice into the mixture. With a ladle dip broth slowly into the egg mixture. When four or five ladles of soup are in mixture pour into broth. Stir.
0 Replies
 
margo
 
  1  
Sat 23 Feb, 2008 12:50 am
farmerman wrote:
Carrots and cloves add a dimension


I read this as "parrots and doves" Shocked

I really must do something about my eyesight@!

dadpad Razz
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Sat 23 Feb, 2008 07:18 am
Cmon, dammit , IM serious here.
Yes margo, we need to take care of our eyes , just so we dont ingest a bottle of Belladonna.

I will think more about the greek version too. Ive had lemon soup before but its always been too much like hot lemonade where a chicken just stpooed by for a dip.

Ya know, Ive tried horseradish in other stuff and had it add something so , consider this added to my list of things to try.

Msolga, did you see Notting hill, where Julia Robersta says that she was a "Fruitarian" . A fruitarian is somebody who only eats fruit that has naturally died and dropped from the tree Very Happy .
Sorry, things at our farm dont have a life of leisure, its either froied eggs or fried chicken.

An old hen has lots of flavor , its redolent with a wholesome chickny goodness. Her husband, Jerry Lee, a mean assed Polish Rooster, had been scarfed up by a fox last summer. Life on a farm is not an ASPCA, sorry. If this changes your opinion of me, think of my poor kids who must be fed, and my cats and dogs who, although we dont eat them, they serve a needed function.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Sun 24 Feb, 2008 03:38 am
farmerman wrote:
....Life on a farm is not an ASPCA, sorry. If this changes your opinion of me, think of my poor kids who must be fed, and my cats and dogs who, although we dont eat them, they serve a needed function.


Of course my (exceedingly high!) opinion of you hasn't changed, farmer! Absolutely not! Perish the thought!

I think it was something about the chook reaching henopause & then getting the chop that struck a chord with me!
It happens so often to us creatures of the female gender, you see! :wink:

(BTW I grew up on a farm. It was never a good idea to get too friendly with the cows, the calves, the chickens ... for obvious reasons!)
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Sun 24 Feb, 2008 05:04 am
we have one Arocauna (sp?) chicken that is about 8 years old. SHe is a pet who walks ariound with me when Im out in the pasture. She will never be touched. The others who are candidates for souping are the big Wyandots . Thee chickens have never unerstood feriendly, so theyve lived a good life and now they are candidates for a flavorful soup.

I agree that old free range chicken has a superior chickny flavor that you cannot get from anything bought in a market.
Weve raised broilers our of guinea hens and they taste like pheasant when roasted. The secret is not to keep them all cooped up so they get fatty.

Yesterday we had big bowls of chicken pot pie at the Strasburg Mud Auction (A seasonal outdoor festival that every volunteer fire company holds in the late winter /early spring). We go to buy quilts , see people whove been all cabined up.)
The chicken pot pie was a thick broth with potatoes, onions, sweet corn , chicken, and these large "Bot Boui" noodles. Its a herty warming soup/stew that goes great at festivals in mid winter.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Sun 24 Feb, 2008 05:28 am
farmerman wrote:
we have one Arocauna (sp?) chicken that is about 8 years old. SHe is a pet who walks ariound with me when Im out in the pasture. She will never be touched.


That's nice, farmer. I can just picture it: you and your pet chicken taking your evening constitutional. Very Happy

You know, it's virtually impossible (apart from some of the ethnic markets here) to buy an old chook for soup purposes at the butcher shops. I know what you mean about older ones making for better soup. My mother used to also throw in the feet, giblets, etc.

Once (when we lived on the farm) my father wasn't around to do the chopping off the chook's head thing & my mother decided she'd do it. She did (very brave of her!)... then had to sit down with her head between her knees, as she almost fainted. When these sorts of things were going on I (when very young & not at all brave about these things) would run into my bedroom & hide my head under the bed, close my eyes & put my hands over my ears! I would have made a lousy farmer! Laughing
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Sun 24 Feb, 2008 10:30 am
I have had pet chickens. The last two I had regarded me as their parent. They trusted in me completely. I once did a thread about Henrietta and Lulu. I also knew a woman whose daughter was given one of those dyed chicks for Easter. She attempted to take it to a country relative in a small box, but was unable to get past the bus driver with it. The woman ended up raising it in her Brooklyn apartment. Mr. Little, it was, until it laid its first egg. Its name was then changed to Mrs. Little. I lost contact with that family, and never learned the chicken's ultimate fate.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Mon 25 Feb, 2008 02:10 am
edgarblythe wrote:
I have had pet chickens. The last two I had regarded me as their parent. They trusted in me completely. I once did a thread about Henrietta and Lulu. I also knew a woman whose daughter was given one of those dyed chicks for Easter. She attempted to take it to a country relative in a small box, but was unable to get past the bus driver with it. The woman ended up raising it in her Brooklyn apartment. Mr. Little, it was, until it laid its first egg. Its name was then changed to Mrs. Little. I lost contact with that family, and never learned the chicken's ultimate fate.


Sounds delightful, edgar!

Could you nudge us in the direction of the Henrietta and Lulu thread?

I'd love to read it.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Mon 25 Feb, 2008 02:13 am
I might remember that thread..
0 Replies
 
plantress
 
  1  
Sat 8 Mar, 2008 07:02 am
the way I make soup seems very inexact. But you are getting it anyway.

After we have had a roast chicken I throw everything-veggies carcass, fat scum in a big pot and cover it with water. I simmer on low for about 2 days. I drain all bits through a colander and save the liquid letting it get cold to scoop off the fat. I pick through the chicken solids and throw out the yuck and bones. I put it all back together and then sautee veggies and add-again back to low flame. The other way is to cook veggies to transparency and puree them before adding back to soup.

The roast chicken was seasoned with garlic slices under the skin and a rosemary rub. That taste gets into the chicken meat. I like lots of freshly ground coarse pepper too.

When I am going to serve it as dinner instead of as a side or lunch then I add rice or something to beef it up a bit. It's very good for you on a wet day in winter!
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Sat 8 Mar, 2008 08:47 am
we had a soup made from a fresh chicken this past week. My wife took the recipe from the old "Vincent Pice" Cookbook. It had cloves in it and I must say that they added a nice complexity with all the other herbs and stuff.
The broth was just like the Yiddisher "goldina" , except with a lot more flavors
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Sat 8 Mar, 2008 09:00 am
msolga wrote:
edgarblythe wrote:
I have had pet chickens. The last two I had regarded me as their parent. They trusted in me completely. I once did a thread about Henrietta and Lulu. I also knew a woman whose daughter was given one of those dyed chicks for Easter. She attempted to take it to a country relative in a small box, but was unable to get past the bus driver with it. The woman ended up raising it in her Brooklyn apartment. Mr. Little, it was, until it laid its first egg. Its name was then changed to Mrs. Little. I lost contact with that family, and never learned the chicken's ultimate fate.


Sounds delightful, edgar!

Could you nudge us in the direction of the Henrietta and Lulu thread?

I'd love to read it.


Here is a link to that old thread.
http://www.able2know.org/forums/viewtopic.php?t=8760
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Sun 9 Mar, 2008 01:55 am
Thanks for the link, edgar. I loved the stories! Very Happy

And it's really good to read some of those wonderful old A2K threads. Sigh.
0 Replies
 
 

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