Reply Thu 14 Feb, 2008 08:21 am
I have everything to make a really good Leek and Chicken soup.
The recipe calls for potatoes and I dont want to use them.

I know that the starch from the potatoes helps with the thickness of the water, so I could probably just add a teaspoon of flour or cornstarch right?

What can I use in place of a potatoe?
Squash? I have several pound of yellow and green

the recipie I am using is -

Quote:

6 x leeks (each about 1.5in. wide)
4 x boneless skinless chicken breast halves 5 oz each
1/2 lb red thin-skinned potatoes
1 tsp butter or margarine
2 cup nonfat chicken broth
1 cup dry vermouth or white wine
1 tbl chopped fresh basil leaves
1 tsp grated lemon peel
1 1/2 cup frozen petite peas
2 tbl cornstarch
salt and pepper
4 x thin lemon slices or more
basil sprigs (optional) rinsed


I think a squash sounds good..
But I am not that familiar with the taste of Leek..

In fact, I can not say I have ever tried a Leek..
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 5,311 • Replies: 17
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mac11
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Feb, 2008 08:27 am
Leeks have a mild onion flavor. I like them.

I think the squash would be good, but it won't help thicken it. As you said, cornstarch or flour can be used for thickeners.
0 Replies
 
mac11
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Feb, 2008 08:27 am
Oh, and the recipe sounds great!
0 Replies
 
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Feb, 2008 08:33 am
Parsnip and turnip have a similar texture. You can also add things like garbanzo beans for a little each weight. Does it say anything about using a soup blender to puree at any point? You could cook up some red lentils and use them as a starch base, they puree nicely.
0 Replies
 
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Feb, 2008 08:56 am
I have canned organic garbanzo beans...

I could use them for that .. that sounds good.
0 Replies
 
Chai
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Feb, 2008 09:02 am
yeah, I think the garbanzos would have a similar texture to potato, and taste too.


You mean winter squash, right? Try delicata squash, they're great.
0 Replies
 
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Feb, 2008 09:03 am
creamy chicken-pasta soup
Shewolf, below is a good soup recipe that uses half-and-half as a thickener. You could also use whipping cream. ---BBB

Creamy chicken-pasta soup
Bon Appétit | November 1999

Servings: Makes 12 First-Course or 6 Main-Course servings.

subscribe to Bon Appétit
Ingredients3 tablespoons butter
4 ounces button mushrooms, sliced
1 cup sliced celery
1 cup shredded carrots (about 2 medium)
1 medium onion, chopped
3 tablespoons all purpose flour
6 cups chicken stock or canned low-salt chicken broth
1 1/2 cups half and half
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
1 1/2 pounds chicken tenders, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
1 cup penne pasta
1/4 pound sugar snap peas, halved diagonally
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

PreparationMelt butter in heavy large pot over medium heat. Add mushrooms, celery, carrots and onion. Cook until celery and onion are tender, about 5 minutes. Add flour and cook 3 minutes, stirring frequently. Gradually mix in chicken stock. Bring soup to simmer, stirring frequently. Add half and half and chopped parsley and simmer 5 minutes. Add chicken tenders and simmer until cooked through, about 5 minutes. (Chicken soup can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cool slightly. Cover and refrigerate.)

Cook penne pasta in large pot of boiling salted water until just tender but still firm to bite. Drain pasta. Bring chicken soup to simmer. Mix in cooked pasta and sugar snap peas and simmer 2 minutes. Mix in lemon juice; season to taste with salt and pepper.
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Feb, 2008 09:08 am
Pasta will do the trick shewolf.

Mumpad uses pasta shells or curls in many of her soups. Puree the soup in the blender after cooking for an even creamy texture.
0 Replies
 
Chai
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Feb, 2008 09:18 am
Re the half and half....Land 'O Lakes makes a fat free half and half (I know, what an oxymoron) and I've used it to make rice pudding, or in bread pudding, and it's been quite sucessful.

Re the delicata squash...

http://whatscookingamerica.net/Vegetables/Delicata2.JPG

I had originally used it for a receipe where you had to split them in half to make boats, and stuff with vegetables and such.

Too much work.

Now I just roughly chop them up, skin and flesh, brown in a little oil with some onions mushroom celery or whatever else I feel like, then simmer in some organic chicken broth. When serving, I'll stir in low fat/fat free sour cream...the half and half would probably be good too.
0 Replies
 
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Feb, 2008 09:27 am
chai
Chai, delicata squash is my favorite squash. I don't like to mess with it. Just half it, spread butter or olive oil on top and bake or microwave. Season with salt and pepper. Enjoy scooping the delicious flesh out and eating it---nothing fancy---as it's flavor needs no assistance. I also like it's small size so it doesn't overwhelm my stomach capacity.

BBB
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Feb, 2008 09:32 am
Oh yes! rice will do as well.
0 Replies
 
mac11
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Feb, 2008 09:34 am
Another fat free option would be fat free evaporated milk.
0 Replies
 
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Feb, 2008 10:04 am
Mmmmmmmmmm all of those sound good.

I ended up using regular yellow and green squash
some artichoke
2 leeks
1 can of mieur glenn diced tomatoes
2 cloves of garlic
3 cups of vegetable broth
2 cups of water
1 cube veggie bullion
1/2 cup kidney beans and 1.2 cup of garbanzo beans
No chicken.

and a few other things


i started with a recipe and ended with 'fridge soup' Smile
0 Replies
 
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Feb, 2008 10:05 am
My little house is smelling awesome already.
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Feb, 2008 06:46 pm
Dunno if anyone mentioned this..... sautee onions in oil, add a small amount of butter when translucent, add flour to soup until the oil and butter is mostly absorbed and cook until the mixture is sort of elastic. This is a roux, more or less.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Feb, 2008 06:53 pm
You could do what some Italian recipes do....use chunks of stale french bread in the soup. It adds texture and thickening to the soup.
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Feb, 2008 08:28 pm
Butrflynet wrote:
You could do what some Italian recipes do....use chunks of stale french bread in the soup. It adds texture and thickening to the soup.


Croutons!

I love a good Crout.
0 Replies
 
Wy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Feb, 2008 05:59 pm
Can any chicken-and-leek soup be called Cockie-Leeky, or is there one traditional recipe for it?
0 Replies
 
 

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