Montana
 
Reply Sat 9 Feb, 2008 12:29 am
I know this is a stupid question, but I need to know the answer. I know most of you must know this and it would help me out.

I look at a rular and I'm confused to whether it represents the first little lines on a meter stick or 10 of the little lines.

I'm confused between centimeters and milimeters Confused
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 2 • Views: 14,119 • Replies: 61
No top replies

 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Feb, 2008 12:45 am
Millimeter is the very smallest measurment on your ruler montana.

10 millimeters = 1 centimeter
0 Replies
 
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Feb, 2008 12:46 am
We refuse to axxept.

Inches are where it's at, sweets....

Cool
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Feb, 2008 12:48 am
l l

the space between these lines above is about a millimeter.


l......l the space between these two lines is about a centimeter
0 Replies
 
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Feb, 2008 12:49 am
How many inches is that, dad?
0 Replies
 
dagmaraka
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Feb, 2008 12:55 am
montana, 1 milimeter is 1/1000 of a meter. 1 centimeter is 1/100 of a meter. 1 decimeter is 1/10 of a meter.

same with liters and grams and similar somesuch things... we keep everything simple and easy. everything a multiple of 10. not 12 1/2 or some other random number, impossible to compute. really, world..time to go metric!
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Feb, 2008 12:58 am
A lot of builders and trade type folk just forget about centimeters and deal in millimeters only.

So i need a piece of timber 1300 x125x25mm

my bread board is 300x500x 2.5

dont let it throw you its just a matter of getting common distances fixed in your mind and related to the particular equivalent metric distance. I am seriouse when i say it is sooooooo much easier.

Go round your house with a ruler and measure stuff. not precisly just round about measurements. The doorway is 900wide the hall way 4500 long.
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Feb, 2008 12:59 am
Rockhead wrote:
How many inches is that, dad?


What da f... is inches.
0 Replies
 
Quincy
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Feb, 2008 05:58 am
1 cm = 0.3937007874 inches
1 inch = 2.54 cm
1 foot = 0.3048 metres
1 metre = 3.28083989501 feet
1 mile = 1.609344 kilometres
1 kilometre = 0.62137119223 miles
1 pound = 0.45359237 kilograms
1 kilogram = 2.20462262184 pounds
( btw, why is pounds abbreviated "lb"?)
0 Replies
 
Francis
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Feb, 2008 06:09 am
Quincy wrote:
( btw, why is pounds abbreviated "lb"?)


It was a time in Europe when Latin was a ligua franca for the educated.

Liber mercatoria was the Latin name for the London pound.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Feb, 2008 06:12 am
dadpad wrote:
l l

the space between these lines above is about a millimeter.


l......l the space between these two lines is about a centimeter


Thanks, Dadpad, that was the best laugh I've has for a while! You forgot that not everybody's monitor screen is the same size as yours, and not everybody uses the same amount of zoom in their browser!

I got out my ruler and your "millimetre" measured 2 mm on my screen, and your "centimetre" measured a bit more than 7 mm (0.7 cm).

They spell the units with -er at the end in the USA, I'm not sure about Canada, and -re just about everywhere else.


They must have crap schools in Australia, Dadpad! Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Feb, 2008 06:13 am
Re: What is a Milimeter?
Montana wrote:
I look at a rular


It's a ruler, not a "rular".
0 Replies
 
raprap
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Feb, 2008 06:17 am
Quincy wrote:
1 cm = 0.3937007874 inches
1 inch = 2.54 cm
1 foot = 0.3048 metres
1 metre = 3.28083989501 feet
1 mile = 1.609344 kilometres
1 kilometre = 0.62137119223 miles
1 pound = 0.45359237 kilograms
1 kilogram = 2.20462262184 pounds
( btw, why is pounds abbreviated "lb"?)


Interesting, but to avoid the slug concept for mass used in MKS, many American engineers that use the FPS system differentiate pounds (lb) into two forms---pounds mass (lbm) and pounds force (lbf) using the conversion factor gc=32.2 ft lbm/(s^2 lbf) to go between the two types of pounds.

BTW there one more common conversion for MKS to FPS
1 metre=39.37 in

A common concept of a million is that there is a million millimeters in a kilometer--if you put this in terms of a common city block (5 to a kilometer--8 to the mile---e.g. 1 km is about 5/8 mile) you can illustrate a feeling of the order of a million.

Rap
0 Replies
 
Quincy
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Feb, 2008 06:31 am
Francis wrote:
Quincy wrote:
( btw, why is pounds abbreviated "lb"?)


It was a time in Europe when Latin was a ligua franca for the educated.

Liber mercatoria was the Latin name for the London pound.


Thanks. And this just goes to show how antiquated pounds, inches and the laot are!
0 Replies
 
Coolwhip
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Feb, 2008 06:34 am
This would have been waaaay easier to just google.

Cm in inches

mm in inches
0 Replies
 
Quincy
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Feb, 2008 06:34 am
Quote:
Interesting, but to avoid the slug concept for mass used in MKS, many American engineers that use the FPS system differentiate pounds (lb) into two forms---pounds mass (lbm) and pounds force (lbf) using the conversion factor gc=32.2 ft lbm/(s^2 lbf) to go between the two types of pounds.

BTW there one more common conversion for MKS to FPS
1 metre=39.37 in

A common concept of a million is that there is a million millimeters in a kilometer--if you put this in terms of a common city block (5 to a kilometer--8 to the mile---e.g. 1 km is about 5/8 mile) you can illustrate a feeling of the order of a million.

Rap


I've never really understood the two types of pounds- I have a few old, English texts that use imperial units. Why complicate things by calling them both pounds! Another reason metric is better!
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Feb, 2008 06:48 am
The conversion amount doesn't matter for general use.

What matters is having a concept in your mind of how far/much a metre/kilogram is.
0 Replies
 
Chumly
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Feb, 2008 07:12 am
Canada has criminalized the use of Imperial, that's focked up!!
Quote:
The law requires that measured products (such as fuel and meat) be priced in metric units............
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperial_units The truth is that Canadian government's metric brainwashing has failed! The truth is that the Canadian metric conversion is totally forked! The facts are that unless the US and all the building trades want metric (and we Electricians hate metric!) Canada will stay Imperial!

Want more proof of the Canadian government's hypocritical metric brainwashing failure?
Quote:
In 2005, the Ontario government announced changes to the secondary school math curriculum that would allow imperial units to be taught along with metric units.[5] This marked a huge turn from when the previous governments did everything to make sure that the curriculum only used the metric system. This was done in light of the fact that much of the private sector has either refused or been very slow to metricate, thus many students had been leaving school unprepared for the units used in the workplace. Many other provinces and territories also include the imperial system of measurements as part of their educational curriculum

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metrication_in_Canada#Demetrication

One of main reasons the metric system sucks donkey balls for Electricians and many others, is that the metric system cannot be factored up and down evenly with anywhere near the same ease as Imperial.

Who cares about Base 10 for measurements, it's only a convention due to the fact that Man has 10 digits.

Simply because base 10 is the de facto standard for math does not make it a good choice for measurements! Example: you can evenly divide 12 many more times than 10, thus the Imperial system is far better for many people, no need to deal with lame-ass fractions!
0 Replies
 
squinney
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Feb, 2008 07:15 am
contrex wrote:
dadpad wrote:
l l

the space between these lines above is about a millimeter.


l......l the space between these two lines is about a centimeter


Thanks, Dadpad, that was the best laugh I've has for a while! You forgot that not everybody's monitor screen is the same size as yours, and not everybody uses the same amount of zoom in their browser!

I got out my ruler and your "millimetre" measured 2 mm on my screen, and your "centimetre" measured a bit more than 7 mm (0.7 cm).



No kidding. I have my screen set at 800X600. I have a 5mm kidney stone.

That just scared the crap outta me! Shocked Very Happy
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Feb, 2008 07:19 am
I have a 17 inch LCD screen running at 1280 x 1024
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Evolution 101 - Discussion by gungasnake
Typing Equations on a PC - Discussion by Brandon9000
The Future of Artificial Intelligence - Discussion by Brandon9000
The well known Mind vs Brain. - Discussion by crayon851
Scientists Offer Proof of 'Dark Matter' - Discussion by oralloy
Blue Saturn - Discussion by oralloy
Bald Eagle-DDT Myth Still Flying High - Discussion by gungasnake
DDT: A Weapon of Mass Survival - Discussion by gungasnake
 
  1. Forums
  2. » What is a Milimeter?
Copyright © 2020 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 09/24/2020 at 05:42:12