4
   

Digital to analog converter box...

 
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Jan, 2008 09:25 pm
Not sure if you are attempting to answer my question about HD reception with rabbit ears. If so, this is the information I read and why I have the concern. Your answer doesn't address this.

From https://www.dtv2009.gov/FAQ.aspx

Quote:
Q - Will I still need an antenna to receive programming?

A - Yes. If you currently use an antenna to receive your over-the-air programming, you will still need it after you install a converter box. In some cases, TV viewers may need a new antenna. For help choosing an antenna in order to receive your free, local broadcast TV channels, visit www.antennaweb.org.


From http://www.antennaweb.org./

Quote:
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Jan, 2008 08:21 am
Currently I'm just using cheap indoor antennas as I'm in a suburban area. If you are further out in the country you will want a good rooftop antenna. In either case, make sure to use shielded coax (RJ-6 or better) all the way from the antenna to the receiver. Many cheap antennas these days come with unshielded coax - avoid them if possible.
0 Replies
 
Tomkitten
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Feb, 2008 06:01 pm
Digital to analog converter box
Quote:
They aren't available at retail yet. The government supposedly is not mailing out the coupons until the devices are available. They anticipated it to be around March 2008.


So we can expect the coupons to be available sometime in July? (snicker snicker)
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  0  
Reply Fri 15 Feb, 2008 08:04 pm
Dear God.

Just get cable or satellite or an antenna with a digital TV.

Figure it out.

I have 100 year old guns that I can still get ammo for.

It won't be that difficult for you.
0 Replies
 
Tomkitten
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Feb, 2008 04:13 am
Digital to analog converter box
Quote:
Figure it out.
Well, cjhs, that's what I'm trying to do. Sorry if I seem a bit stupid..
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Mar, 2008 09:28 pm
The $40 coupons are starting to be delivered. I just got mine in the mail this week. Been looking at the websites to see which of the 34 qualified converter box brands and models are available and what the reviews of them have been.

The flyer that comes with the coupon lists only three major retailers and says there are hundres of smaller retailers currently accepting coupons.

The big three are Best Buy, Radio Shack and Wal-Mart.

I looked on their websites to check things out. Here are links to what is available and how they've been reviewed by recipients thus far. Prices range between $50 and $60. Looks like only 5 of the 34 qualified boxes are currently available.

Magnavox at Walmart $52.97

Thompson RCA at Walmart $52.97

Digital Stream at Radio Shack $59.99

Zenith at Radio Shack $59.99

Insignia at Best Buy $59.99
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Aug, 2008 02:04 am
@Foofie,
It's easier to just buy a new TV. You can get one for $100 and that's real cheap.
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Aug, 2008 09:06 pm
@Miller,
I am not finding this new A2K simple to understand, so I know I have not replied in a timely manner; however, having received the coupons months ago, and got a box at Best Buy, the tv gets most of the HD channels. I think there is some interference with some signals, due to other buildings, so I do not get all the channels I got with the analog signal. I think I will just read more books! Thank you for the input everyone.
0 Replies
 
Wilso
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Apr, 2009 05:40 am
@Butrflynet,
Butrflynet wrote:

I'm not planning on racing to the store to be one of the first to buy a converter. I want to read feedback from others who did and what their experience is with rabbit ear antennas and mildly snowy reception. If the reception isn't any good for HD then it is silly to spend the money on a converter that won't convert anything.

There isn't much on TV I'll miss other than PBS.


If your situation is similar to Australia, then your $60 converter won't give you HD! It will just provide you standard definition digital channels. HD boxes are available, but they're priced in the hundreds.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Apr, 2009 05:42 am
My converter box gave us additional channels and a much clearer picture. It is well worth it to get one.
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Apr, 2009 05:51 am
@edgarblythe,
picked one up, works pretty good, but will need a better antenna
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Apr, 2009 06:42 am
@djjd62,
A good antenna is key. I bought two before it worked right.
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Apr, 2009 06:56 am
@edgarblythe,
canada doesn't change until 2001, but living on the border we get mostly american stations, however we don't watch enough tv to make cable or satellite worth the price
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Apr, 2009 07:45 am
@djjd62,
Rolling Eyes

should be 2011
0 Replies
 
perl
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Apr, 2009 01:25 pm
@Wilso,
Let me clarify this, and some other things.

The <=$60 converter boxes, like all digital TV tuners, do have the ability to receive HD channels. They just downconvert the HD to SD on output. This is an important point, since a lot of programming is only being broadcast in HD, but will still be watchable on SD-only sets. E.g., all of the major broadcast network affiliates in NYC (CBS, NBC, FOX, ABC, MyNetwork, CW, PBS) are broadcasting in HD *only*. If you are concerned about being able to see the full HD resolution on an HD set that doesn't have an up-to-date digital tuner, then the cheap converter boxes won't do it for you. But if you're only concerned about being able to receive all of the channels in SD, including the HD ones, then any digital tuner will do.

As far as the distinction between "digital" and "HDTV" antennas, forget it. It's a marketing scam. Any antenna capable of receiving a digital TV signal will give you HD, whether it's marketed as HD or not. A digital TV signal is a stream of bits. The bit rate is fixed and determined by the 6MHz bandwidth. No matter whether the frequency is carrying an SD channel, an HD channel, or several subchannels of HD and SD combined, it all has to be compressed down to 19.38Mb/s. The tuner receives the bit stream and picks out the bits that relate to the subchannel you're trying to receive. Either you receive the whole bit stream or you don't. Whether some, most, or all of those bits are carrying an HD picture has no effect on the antenna's ability to receive the bit stream.
Wilso
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Apr, 2009 02:24 pm
@perl,
Well, you're different to here. We've got dedicated HD channels, and the cheap digital boxes just give you a message "no service".
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Apr, 2009 02:43 pm
@Wilso,
For those in the US, Perl's description is correct. Note that if you are used to getting analog signals, you will be astounded by the quality of the digital signals converted to analog. The ghosting problem is completely gone. I had an 20 year old TV I was experimenting on and the result was amazing.
0 Replies
 
 

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