2
   

Luxury versions of everyday products.

 
 
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2007 07:23 am
dadpad wrote:
patiodog wrote:
They're kitchen


I bet the people who run the Italian place around the corner can spell.


It's spelled right.



It's just the wrong word.






















Damn pedants.
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2007 07:25 am
Thunderchicken.

http://www.lewis-clark.org/media/NewImages/VIEWS/brd_grouse-ruffed.jpg
0 Replies
 
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2007 07:27 am
truffle oil


( thanks to GW ) I never heard about it before she started a thread about truffles.

I found a tiny bottle for 25 bucks.

Took it home, and fell in love.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2007 07:59 am
Almost forgot. This is the start of the season for fresh blood orange juice. Its sweet and perfumey.
0 Replies
 
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2007 08:58 am
Roger
roger wrote:
Some day, I'm going to get around to ordering a dedicated onion chopper from the Chef's site, if I've got the name right. It's the most hateful part of making spagheti sauce.


Next time you are in Abuquerque, Roger, I will give you one of mine.

BBB
0 Replies
 
Bella Dea
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2007 09:02 am
real butter

the other stuff is just crap.
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2007 09:25 am
Real parmesan reggiano or even grana padana.
BMW's.... nothing compares.
Widescreen laptops with extended destops.
Browning. 'nuff said.
0 Replies
 
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2007 09:26 am
Indian Peaches
When the Lady Diane, Phoenix and I visited a local Albuquerque farmers' market this summer. I discovered a farmer whose Indian Red Peach orchard will be ready to produce in 2008 in mid August. I love these sweet peaches that I used to buy in the San Francisco Bay Area and miss them so much. They have a very short season so I ate lots of them every August. You never see them in stores and must buy them from the farmers' market.

http://www.specialtyproduce.com/spNetwork.ASP?Item=632&WCI=Frameset&WCE=Main

That same farmer also had some tiny French Seckel pears. I bought all she had. They also have a short season in the Fall.

http://www.usapears.com/pears/varieties_seckel.asp

That same farmer had a few small quince to sell. I bought three, stewed them and ate them all in one day.

http://www.pccnaturalmarkets.com/health/Food_Guide/Quince.htm

I so much miss the San Francisco Bay Area's farmers' markets. They are one of the few things I get homesick for.

BBB
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2007 09:30 am
West Michigan grows the best peaches in the country. Few know this because the crop is fairly small and they rarely make it out of midwestern markets (most are canned, frozen, or made into jams). They are known as Red Haven peaches, and nothing else comes close.
0 Replies
 
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2007 09:31 am
Re: Indian Peaches
BumbleBeeBoogie wrote:
When the Lady Diane, Phoenix and I visited a local Albuquerque farmers' market this summer. I discovered a farmer whose Indian Red Peach orchard will be ready to produce in 2008 in mid August. I love these sweet peaches that I used to buy in the San Francisco Bay Area and miss them so much. They have a very short season so I ate lots of them every August. You never see them in stores and must buy them from the farmers' market.

http://www.specialtyproduce.com/spNetwork.ASP?Item=632&WCI=Frameset&WCE=Main

That same farmer also had some tiny French Seckel pears. I bought all she had. They also have a short season in the Fall.

http://www.usapears.com/pears/varieties_seckel.asp

That same farmer had a few small quince to sell. I bought three, stewed them and ate them all in one day. Diane bought a couple and I e-mailed her the directions for cooking them.

http://www.pccnaturalmarkets.com/health/Food_Guide/Quince.htm

I so much miss the San Francisco Bay Area's farmers' markets. They are one of the few things I get homesick for.

BBB
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2007 10:01 am
BBB we have a grove of quince bushes in the woods below our lower pasture. It was once a homestead and the apple trees have long gone but the quince bushes are still living after about 100 years. I never knew what to do with them and dont know how to make quince jelly.
0 Replies
 
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2007 10:12 am
I find that New Mexico and specifically Albaturkey/Santa Fe has excellent famers markets and quite a large number of them as well. From Taos apricots and Sand Plums to Olathe sweet corn, veggies of all types.
0 Replies
 
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2007 10:18 am
Farmerman
farmerman wrote:
BBB we have a grove of quince bushes in the woods below our lower pasture. It was once a homestead and the apple trees have long gone but the quince bushes are still living after about 100 years. I never knew what to do with them and dont know how to make quince jelly.


Here is one recipe:
http://www.elise.com/recipes/archives/001455quince_jelly.php

My favorite way of cooking quince is to oven bake it in a sugar syrup with orange zest. Baking makes the flavor more intense than simmering.

Here are some recipes for baking quince:

Kydonia sto Fourno: Sweet Baked Quince
From Nancy Gaifyllia,
Your Guide to Greek Food.

Quince is a greatly underappreciated fruit in many countries, but if anything can change that, this recipe might be it. The raw fruit is astringent, but cooked with various amounts of sugar and spices, quince is delicious as a dessert, preserve, and spoon sweet.

INGREDIENTS:
3 1/2 pounds of whole quince
1 3/4 cups of sugar
1 stick of cinnamon, broken into 3 pieces
whole cloves
2 cups + 5 ounces of water
PREPARATION:
Preheat oven to 355°F (180°C).

Wash the quince well, remove and discard stem, and cut in half. Remove seeds and tough fiber surrounding the seeds. Place in a bowl of water until ready to use to prevent the fruit from darkening.

In a pot, add the water, sugar, quince seeds, and tough fiber, and boil for 8-10 minutes.
----------------------------------

Quince baked in honey
Chef: Rob Scott
A delicious autumn desert
Serves 3

You need:
3 large quinces
80 gms butter
4 tbs honey
1/4 cup water
1 sheet aluminium foil

Method:
Preheat your oven to about 150'c.

Halve but don't peel the quinces.

Remove the seeds and core out the quince with a spoon to make a neat hollow.

In a baking dish place a 1/3 of the butter and grease the sides and bottom of the dish.

Place the quince halves into the baking dish, hollow side up.

gently pour the water around the edges of the quinces.

Place a sheet of foil over the baking dish and bake for about 3 hours (until the quinces are soft and a rich red colour), turning the quinces over at or about 1 1/2 hours into the cooking.

Serving Suggestion: When serving, serve hot with hollow side up and fill with the honey liquid and with a dob of rich double or clotted cream.
---------------------------------------

QUINCE TART
By BumbleBeeBoogie

1 cup granulated white sugar
1 cup water
3 large quince, peeled, cored and thinly sliced
1 teaspoon each of dried lemon and orange peel
1 - 9-inch almond tart shell, unbaked*
1 cup heavy cream
1 large whole egg plus 1 egg yolk
1/4 cup granulated white sugar
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger, or to taste

Preheat the oven at 425 degrees F. Set the oven rack on the lowest position.

Place the sugar and water in a saucepan and bring to a boil; let boil over low heat until the sugar is dissolved, about 5 minutes.

Add the sliced quinces and the dried peel and poach over low heat until tender, 20 to 30 minutes. Let the slices cool in the syrup. (This may be done ahead.) Drain the quince slices; reserve the poaching liquid and refrigerate in a covered container for other uses**. Arrange the quince slices on the crust overlapping each other in a pretty pattern. Bake the tart for 20 minutes. If the crust darkens too much, cover it with aluminum foil.

While the quinces are baking, beat the cream, eggs, sugar and ginger together well with a fork until the mixture forms ribbons when you life the fork over the bowl.

Remove the tart from the oven. Reduce the oven temperature to 425 degrees F.

Very carefully, pour the custard mixture over the quinces and with a steady hand return the tart to the oven without spilling the custard over the rim of the tart (or ladle the custard into the tart while it is in the oven). Bake until the custard is just set, about 25 minutes. Cool the tart slightly and serve. Serves 6.

*To convert a regular pie crust to the almond tart crust, use:
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup finely ground almonds (or hazelnuts)
1/2 teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons cold butter in small pieces
1 egg yolk
ice cold water, starting with 1 teaspoonful, if needed to hold the mixture loosely together to pat into the 9-inch pie pan.

Combine ingredients and proceed as for making a standard pie crust.

**The reserved quince poaching liquid is an excellent base for recipes containing pork.
0 Replies
 
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2007 10:34 am
BBB's favorite Seckel Pear recipe
French Seckel Pears with Blue Cheese in Marscapone
By BumbleBeeBoogie

Don't miss trying this simple but wonderfully refreshing dish as an appetizer or as a dessert while Seckel pears are in available in the fall and winter seasons.

1 package of the best English Blue Cheese you can find
1 package of the best Marscapone (Italian creamed cheese)
optional 1 teaspoon of brandy or Calvados
French Seckel Pears, peeled, cut in half, cored and sliced

Stir the optional brandy or Calvados into the Marscapone until well-mixed; finely crumble and mash the blue cheese and add to the Marscapone; mix well.

Serve as a dipping sauce for the slices of French Seckel Pears. This sauce is wonderful for other types of pears as well.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2007 10:41 am
What a nice list! Thank you all for your replies!

There is a sausage place near my house called Ottos (voted one of the 10 best hot dogs in America). Every day they have a grill out front and sell a variety of sausage dogs. I always try to coordinate my shopping with lunch time so I can dodge across the street for a dog before getting down to shopping. Rumor has it that inside the shop they sell a very nice variety of cheeses. I'm going to have to wander in sometime.

What do you use truffle oil for, shewolf?

I'm sure I could find that around here because truffles grow here in the forest. There are truffle "wars" every season.

I love seasonal foods. I live for the few weeks a year I can get Copper River salmon and Walla Walla Sweet onions.

I'm lucky to live in a place where such a variety of things can be grown. The other day a neighbor brought me a sack of figs from her parent's tree. Yum!
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2007 10:42 am
Quince is also good with lamb

--
0 Replies
 
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2007 10:47 am
Calamity
CalamityJane wrote:
Quince is also good with lamb--


http://www.epicurious.com/tools/searchresults?search=lamb%20chop%20quince
0 Replies
 
 

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