12
   

Free your feet, free your soul!

 
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 04:04 pm
@Noddy24,
Just read this thread right through, from the start. A quote from Noddy in 2007:

Quote:
The logic behind high heels is to give an illusion of longer legs and the reality of a come-hither wiggle for the backside.

High heels also resulted in a woman being physically vulnerable--off balance and unable to flee.
chai2
 
  2  
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 08:45 pm
@msolga,
msolga wrote:

Just read this thread right through, from the start. A quote from Noddy in 2007:

Quote:
The logic behind high heels is to give an illusion of longer legs and the reality of a come-hither wiggle for the backside.

High heels also resulted in a woman being physically vulnerable--off balance and unable to flee.



same thing with foot binding.

also, I'm thinking it was an ego booster for the men to be able to support a woman, or women, that were essentially useless.

I had to write a paper on foot binding once. After a while, I would literally get nauseous, the more I learned, and saw.

Here's an x-ray of what a bound foot ended up looking like. Yes, that's the heel and the ball of the foot touching.

http://static.newworldencyclopedia.org/thumb/1/14/Bound_feet_(X-ray).jpg/250px-Bound_feet_(X-ray).jpg


Here's an old woman displaying her left foot, with the toes curled under the ball of the foot, and her instep bent to meet the heel.

The feet would be putrid. The smell was considered really arousing to the men.

http://thumb2.visualizeus.com/thumbs/09/04/02/china,chinese,feet,lotus,feet,photography-8bad255e755d5dad828ae228d8613e0e_m.jpg

http://img1.visualizeus.com/thumbs/09/04/02/china,chinese,feet,lotus,feet,photography-ac0516f90d6bea60cf726e3e46c6cb49_h.jpg
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Dec, 2009 08:50 pm
@chai2,
Oh my goodness, chai. Those photographs are truly shocking!

Quote:
I had to write a paper on foot binding once.


Really? You are probably our resident feet expert then.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jul, 2011 01:03 am
Do any of you own a pair of these "toning shoes"?
How useful have you found them?

They look like this:

http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRsgvOmZqrjn-tviQPzAI3XYLqeOqzOg2ofyuk6DhNNLWYpWVzI7w

They are supposed to "shape & tone" your body while you walk.

Hmmmmmm .......

Anyway, I read this article in the NYT this morning & the shaping & toning claims appear to be rather far-fetched. The interesting thing (from reading posters' comments) is that apparently they have proved to be beneficial to some people for entirely different reasons .:

Quote:
July 13, 2011, 12:01 am
Can Shoes Really Tone the Body?
By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS/NYT
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2011/07/13/health/13Physed/13Physed-blog480.jpg

New scientific experiments can be inspired by a simple question, and in the case of John Mercer, that question was, “So, John, do toning shoes work?”

Dr. Mercer, a professor of biomechanics at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, was talking with a friend who runs an athletic shoe store. The friend told him that customers were coming in and requesting toning shoes, which are soft sneakers, often with a rocker-shaped sole, that promise to exercise and tighten muscles in the calves, thighs and buttocks. (“Your boobs will be jealous,” a refined advertising campaign for one of the shoes declared.) Many manufacturers make them: Reebok, New Balance, MBT, FitFlops and Crocs, among others.

The store owner carried various models of the toning shoes. But, he told Dr. Mercer, he was uncomfortable recommending them to his customers, because he didn’t know if they actually functioned as claimed.

Dr. Mercer didn’t know, either. So he recruited a group of healthy young female students (toning shoes are marketed almost exclusively to women) and had them walk on a treadmill for 10 minutes at a time while wearing, alternately, a walking shoe or a toning shoe — in this case, the Skechers Shape-ups. He and his colleagues attached sensors to the women’s legs to measure the electrical impulses generated as their muscles contracted. They also determined the women’s oxygen consumption, to see if they worked harder and burned more calories with one shoe rather than the other.

But as it turned out, according to results presented in June at the annual meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, muscle activation and oxygen consumption were almost identical whether the women wore walking shoes or Shape-ups. The finding “was a little surprising,” Dr. Mercer said, since his volunteers commented that the toning shoes, with their bowed, unstable bottoms, felt different underfoot from the walking shoes. But that difference didn’t change how they moved in the various models, he said. ...<cont>


http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/07/13/can-shoes-really-tone-the-body/?src=me&ref=general

Just curious to know if any of you who might own a pair have any comments from your own experience.
chai2
 
  2  
Reply Thu 14 Jul, 2011 07:02 am
@msolga,
whoa.
thanks for bumping this thread msolga.

re those toning shoes....do NOT get them!

I've got to run out of the house right now, but I'll be back later to discuss.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jul, 2011 07:53 am
@chai2,
Yes, "toning" shoes, chai.

But check out the posters' comments.
Apparently they're not that much different to any other sports shoes for toning the body (as the the manufacturers claim they do) , but the number of personal responses which claimed they helped alleviate foot, arthritis, hip, etc, problems was really interesting.
I'll be very interested to see what you make of it all.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jul, 2011 08:31 am
@msolga,
Hi msolga.

I can only go by what I have learned via my rolfer, going to yoga, and in general having an acute body awareness, as far as where the various parts of my body are taking up space, and if all the parts are in the proper position to function properly.

A couple of years back, I considered getting those shoes. I actually bought them. (then immediatley returned them after learning the truth)
At the store I put them on, and yes, they do cause your body to stand straighter, feel balanced.
I took them to my rolfer, and she immediately nixed them, and with, now I can see, very good cause.

Sandy (my rolfer), has said on more than one occassion "The worst thing parents do to their children in their learning to walk and move about is putting shoes on their feet."

Our foot, in it's natural state, is supposed to be supple, flexibe and strong. Our big toe is the major hinge that flexes as we move our body forward past our center of gravity. As we move forward, the purpose of our big toe is to, with a good amount of force, propel our body through space, enabling our hips to swivel freely, our knees to flex and absorb, our back to remain erect yet subtle.
Walking is a very interactive and complicated activity, and it all starts with a foot that is able to navigate uneven terrain by bending, flexing, minutely changing our balance microsecond to microsecond. We think of walking of plodding one foot in front of the other, but it's really not.

What you want to wear on your feet are shoes that best simulate walking barefoot. The more flexible the sole the better. You've got to let your foot do its job, and grow stronger, and use things like massage and facia release to get them as open and flexible as possible.

These toning shoes are prisons for your feet. The soles are thick and do not flex. While the rolling action you get when you walk in them feels good, really good, this is something your foot is supposed to be doing, not the shoe. When wearing them, your foot is not moving much, you're rolling forward only because the sole of the shoe rocks you forward.

Better to go get body work done so that your foot is able to perform what this shoe is trying to simulate, which is the foots normal function.

CalamityJane
 
  2  
Reply Thu 14 Jul, 2011 09:09 am
I actually have a pair of these "toning" shoes and they're super comfortable
(like most sneakers) and I love walking in them. I seem to have less problems with pain at the ball of my feet when walking for a longer stretch.
I also have a high arch which contributes to soreness of the tendon/ball and
these rounded shoes with their thick soles are just very comfortable and
agreeable to my feet.

chai2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jul, 2011 09:15 am
@CalamityJane,
oh, I'm not saying they aren't comfortable.

But they aren't letting your feet do what they are supposed to.

Basically, they are tricked out orthopedic shoes.

CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jul, 2011 09:19 am
@chai2,
Yes that's true, but since I wear them only for sports activities, I need comfort
more than anything else.I wouldn't want to be in them all day long.....any shoe for that matter, I am the loving barefoot type....
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jul, 2011 02:20 pm
@CalamityJane,
so jane, how long until msolga gets up?
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jul, 2011 05:38 pm
@chai2,
If she's in Melbourne, it's Friday 9:38 am right now....
if she's closer to Perth, than it's 7:38 am
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jul, 2011 05:56 pm
@chai2,
Msolga is up & on the run, chai. (Please feel free to call me Olga. That feels me like me. Smile )
And I've gotta get moving very soon!

Thank you so much for all the information.
I'll read it much more carefully when I return home later today.

Yes, it makes perfect sense that our feet should be as free as possible to do the work they were intended to do without hindrance from inappropriate & possiblely harmful, constricting footwear. (I still wander around the place in summer in bare feet & Birkenstocks ....I'm certain I've gained an extra shoe size as a result of my feet being free to spread out, rather than being constrained.)

But I wonder, along with Jane & some of the folk who responded to the NYT article, whether wearing "toners" for only some of the time, for particular activities, can do all that much harm? Especially if there are remedial orthopedic benefits for the wearers?

I bought some Skechers Shape-Ups a couple of years ago. I confess I haven't used them regularly, just off & on ... but they are very comfortable, I must say.

Sorry I can't say more right now. Back later!
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jul, 2011 05:59 pm
@CalamityJane,
Good morning, Jane! Smile
Melbourne time right this minute is 9:59 am EST.
And I'll be late for an appointment if I don't get moving very soon!
Back later.

dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jul, 2011 06:38 pm
@msolga,
Hi Msolga, I have a pair of them....largely because, as you may remember, I had absolute pain disaster while I was overseas.

I find them ok to walk in....I really just wanted something that hurt different areas from the ones that were so deeply blistered!

I have to have exceptional cushioning when walking because of my arthritic knees and damaged hjnx. , b. Hn h mung h. Jam's. M , """j. M'," "' ,', viola typing damaged back.

They are ok for that so far, but they blister the front of my two middle toes!

My body seems quite to like the rocker sole, but it's a very soft one.


dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jul, 2011 06:42 pm
@dlowan,
I have a friend with major foot and back injuries who wears nothing but the so called Masai barefoot technology shoes, which these rocker sneakers are sort of a copy of.

I know there's lots of disagreement about the benefits of those, but she is able to walk reasonable distances on them for the first time in years. When I have tried them they really help my back.

I doubt there's much benefit for normal people in the rocker sole, though.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2011 03:19 am
@dlowan,
Hi, Deb.

It seems (from the responses to the NYT article & from what you have described) that some varieties of the "toning" walking footwear are bringing some comfort to ordinary folk with feet & other problems.

Of course, this is hardly the response that the manufacturers of these "tonal" trainers would have anticipated, or had hoped for! Wink

Never mind.
These shoes may not be able to be sold as easy-peasy "body toners" in the future, but they seem to have had real benefits for people with a variety of foot & other problems, never-the-less.

In your case, maybe you should investigate other brands, to see if they feel more comfortable for your feet than the pair which is causing you some problems at the moment?
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Jul, 2011 08:00 pm
@chai2,
You didn't come back, chai. Sad

Quote:
What you want to wear on your feet are shoes that best simulate walking barefoot. The more flexible the sole the better. You've got to let your foot do its job, and grow stronger, and use things like massage and facia release to get them as open and flexible as possible.

These toning shoes are prisons for your feet. The soles are thick and do not flex. While the rolling action you get when you walk in them feels good, really good, this is something your foot is supposed to be doing, not the shoe. When wearing them, your foot is not moving much, you're rolling forward only because the sole of the shoe rocks you forward.

Better to go get body work done so that your foot is able to perform what this shoe is trying to simulate, which is the foots normal function.


But if a person is a walker, and really enjoys walking& intends to keep walking, what would Sandy recommend they walk in?
Keeping in mind that in cities we'd be walking on roads & footpaths, hard surfaces.
I know it's best for your feet to walk on sand, or grass, but that's not possible for some of us, when walking in an urban environment.

CalamityJane
 
  2  
Reply Wed 20 Jul, 2011 08:20 pm
@msolga,
Yeah, try walking on cobblestone all day long *ouch*
I'll stand by my "the thicker the sole the better for your feet" motto!
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Jul, 2011 08:34 pm
@CalamityJane,
Quote:
Yeah, try walking on cobblestone all day long *ouch*

Smile
Yeah, I've visited Germany, Jane. I know of what you speak! Wink

Quote:
I'll stand by my "the thicker the sole the better for your feet" motto!

At the very least, something that cushions the feet from the impact. I agree.
I developed an arthritic big toe on my left foot (ouch! ouch!) when I stomped around city streets at great speed, in totally the wrong (running) shoes, many years ago. The problem lingers to this day. I have to be very careful about my choice of shoes for any purpose, not just for walking.
 

Related Topics

Should cheerleading be a sport? - Discussion by joefromchicago
Are You Ready For Fantasy Baseball - 2009? - Discussion by realjohnboy
tennis grip - Question by madalina
How much faster could Usain Bolt have gone? - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Sochi Olympics a Resounding Success - Discussion by gungasnake
 
Copyright © 2020 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 08/05/2020 at 10:32:33