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Beautiful Plants

 
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Feb, 2007 07:39 pm
Mimosa tree. These are all over the southern US. None up north Sad
http://www.bsu.edu/blogcaster/~lauren/wp-content/mimosa20tree.jpg
http://pics.davesgarden.com/pics/htop_1117450480_489.jpg
http://www.allenbytree.com/month_Aug_files/image002.jpg
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Feb, 2007 07:39 pm
CI. those are terrific garden shots..

I've kicked myself for years that I didn't go to Japan when I had the chance, back in 1980, in a group, with my teacher, later mentor, who was from there and had access to many gardens the public doesn't routinely get to see, or maybe ever. Slaps side of own head. Thanks for posting all those.
0 Replies
 
Tai Chi
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Feb, 2007 08:04 pm
http://i121.photobucket.com/albums/o235/taichi_photos/ladyslippers.jpg

Yellow lady slippers -- don't they look like ballet slippers?
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Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Feb, 2007 06:39 am
gardenia



http://www.systbot.uu.se/staff/k_andreasen/gardenia.jpg
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Feb, 2007 09:50 am
ooooooooooohhhhhhhhhh.... my grandmother loved gardenias. And African Violets. We all have African Violets, but none of us seem to have the patience for gardenias.
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CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Feb, 2007 10:32 am
Magnolias are always beautiful too

http://www.english-country-garden.com/a/i/flowers/magnolia-1.jpg
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rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Feb, 2007 10:42 am
Coleus are also beautiful plants.
http://floridafriendlyplants.com/RFF/images/Plants/Coleus%20Collection.JPG
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rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Feb, 2007 10:47 am
Weeping Willows:
http://home.tiscali.nl/multiphonics/spoorsingel.gif
http://img402.imageshack.us/img402/9302/882os0.jpg
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jespah
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Feb, 2007 11:16 am
You don't need to flower to be beautiful. How 'bout some conifers?

Blue Spruce: http://www.saundersbrothers.com/Catalog/JPGS/Perennials/Sedum%20reflexum%20'Blue%20Spruce'%20SBI2004.JPG
Cypress: http://www.usi.edu/science/biology/twinswamps/jpeg%20pix/cypress%20trees.jpg
Bristlecone pine (the oldest living things, over 3,000 years old, some of 'em): http://sos.state.nv.us/images/brist.jpg
Scots pine: http://www.english-country-garden.com/a/i/trees/scots-pine-4.jpg
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Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Feb, 2007 03:42 am
orchids:


http://www.superherodesigns.com/journal/spotted_orchid.jpg


black-eyed susans


http://www.nativesoftexas.com/images/black_eyed_susan.JPG
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Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Feb, 2007 05:46 am
Cherry blossoms:


http://www.dsphotographic.com/g2/10390-3/Cherry+Blossoms+-+025.jpg
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jespah
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Feb, 2007 05:15 am
More nonflowering wonders:

Bracken ferns: http://photos.imageevent.com/edbook/edbookalbum20eastcoastautumn/IMGP1842-ferns-VT-w.jpg
Fiddlehead ferns: http://www1.istockphoto.com/file_thumbview_approve/363113/2/istockphoto_363113_anticipation_of_spring_fuzzy_fiddleheads.jpg
Epiphytes: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6c/Aerial_Garden-Ferns_on_a_tree.jpg/595px-Aerial_Garden-Ferns_on_a_tree.jpg
Club Mosses: http://sps.k12.ar.us/massengale/images/1psilotum_nudum1.jpg
Bryophyta (Moss): http://elves.ro/pblog/wp-content/uploads/2006/05/bryophyta.png
Spanish Moss: http://phillipbutler.com/portfoliolargepics/OPgBy-xciYW-LTtNg-spanish_moss.jpg
0 Replies
 
satt fs
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Feb, 2007 05:55 am
cherries
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/83/205483992_8ac011392b.jpg
0 Replies
 
satt fs
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2007 01:30 am
March 1, 2007
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/131/406634214_e691641549.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/181/406634296_e1de20a01b.jpg
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jespah
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2007 06:04 am
Gorgeous, satt!

Brush algae in a fish tank: http://www.thekrib.com/Plants/Algae/brush-algae.jpg
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2007 06:54 am
jespah wrote:
More nonflowering wonders:

Bracken ferns: http://photos.imageevent.com/edbook/edbookalbum20eastcoastautumn/IMGP1842-ferns-VT-w.jpg


Apparently Austral bracken is poisenous to cattle

Bracken fern (Pteridium esculentum) is a hardy native fern, consisting of a tough stem, green fronds and fleshy underground stems or rhizomes. Besides Australia, it is found on a number of continents including Europe and America.
http://home.vtown.com.au/~dbellamy/native/images/bracken.jpg
Large amounts of shredded bracken ferns collected in late spring and mixed with manures, are a valuable addition to the compost. They provide an excellent organic source of potash, which has been concentrated from the sandy, potash deficient soils in which they normally grow. Ferns collected later in the growing season are lower in potash and much slower to decompose into humus.

When shredded they are useful for poultry deep litter prior to going into the compost.

A great supply of mulch can be obtained from piles of slashed bracken fern, that has been compacted and allowed to partially breakdown over a six month period.

The tough stems of older ferns make ideal throw away, pea supports. The whole fern provide an ideal shade umbrella over tender seedlings (cauliflowers, broccoli, cabbage, lettuces and silver beet etc) planted out during the hot sunny days of summer.

To control bracken infestations repeated removal of the young fronds will gradually weaken the plants by deleting the food stored in their rhizomes. Spreading concentrated poultry manure will soon cause the decline of a patch of bracken fern. Once the ferns has stopped growing use the ground to grow a healthy crop of organic potatoes.

The foraging Australian aboriginal women sort out the taller and more succulent bracken ferns, which were generally located in the moister wet sclerophyll forests. The moisture allows the growth of a thick, starchy rhizome.

These rhizomes were treated as a staple food, but required substantial preparation before eating. Their preparation for eating involved washing, beating into a paste, moulding into cakes and finally roasting in hot ashes. During times of limited food alternatives, such as when seafood was scarce, these roots became the main food for short periods.

Another important usage were there medicinal properties. The juice from the young fronds was used to stop itch and sting of ticks and other insects. It was broken and the juice rubbed on, after the tick was removed.

The American Indians consumed the fiddle hooks for removing intestinal worms and crushed them to relieve the pain from burns and scalds.
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2007 07:06 am
Holy crow, interesting info.
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dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2007 07:14 am
I think mine different to the one you posted a picture of jespah.
I would call yours a fishbone fern I think.
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neko nomad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2007 10:19 pm
There's beauty in a field if ripening grain. Click for a wallpaper size image:
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/58/187890218_99b18bdab9_m.jpg
credit: Flickr
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Sun 4 Mar, 2007 12:04 am
British Soldier Lichen
http://www.hsu.edu/uploadedImages/Biology/redcoat%20lichens200.jpg
Red Lichen
http://www.dcxp.com/kanshungtrek_gallery/800w_600h/red-lichen.jpg
Lichen on Trees
http://www.steveshamesphotos.com/images/Sequoia08.jpg
http://www.nativetreesociety.org/fieldtrips/gsmnp/will4/lichen_top_of_tree8.jpg
Lichen on Rocks
http://www.carto.net/neumann/travelling/joshua_tree_np_gettys_2003_11/06_lichen.jpg
http://www.freenaturepictures.com/assets/images/medres/lichenrocks.jpg

I cheated for this sequence; Lichens are not plants. They are fungi infused with photosynthetic algae or bacteria, or both. They are a symbiot organism. None the less I find them amazing. Around here they sometimes cover the trees from top to bottom.
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