3
   

Starting a High School Newspaper

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Jan, 2007 06:56 pm
Happy to hear of the growth there, Eva.


Here's a link I meant to add before, somewhat related -
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/01/04/BAG31NCF5E1.DTL&hw=censoring+student+paper&sn=002&sc=593
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Jan, 2007 07:30 pm
Eva wrote:
Noddy, I am proud but mostly gratified. Seeing that kind of change in a student convinces me that my time & effort has been worthwhile.

Butrflynet, the administration has the ability to post the publication on the school's website as a "pdf." It would be very easy to do that. However, after our initial confrontations over content, they have so far been reluctant to do so. They see it as a risky move. This school contains several divisions...preschool through highschool...so that means all ages would then have access to the newspaper. Some of the subject matter might not sit well with younger students' parents, and others might object that their kids' classes were left out. Most would realize that it's a highschool publication, and it's not meant for all ages. But some would see it simply as "the school newspaper." So far this has been easily controlled through physical distribution.

But I want it online, and so do the kids in my class. The administration is beginning to consider it. I'm winning them over. :wink:



To break the ice, how about just a one page advertisement for the journalism class, not the content of the paper? Along with a synopsis of your curriculum, students could write about what they are learning about the media, and freedom and responsibilities of the press from the journalism experience. You could advertise future generic story subjects or polls for stories. Maybe, also provide a place for local merchants and charities to contact the school for advertising placement in the newspaper. Get the newspaper to bring in a little advertising income for the school....
0 Replies
 
gustavratzenhofer
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Jan, 2007 07:55 pm
Hey, Butrflynet, I heard a rumor earlier that BBB was your mom?

Why am I always the last to know this crap?
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Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Jan, 2007 08:06 pm
Ummm, I think Eva's earlier answer will suffice, Gus.

Quote:
Some of the subject matter might not sit well with younger students' parents, and others might object that their kids' classes were left out. So far this has been easily controlled through physical distribution.



You just don't subscribe to the most current rumor mills, pops. Wink
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Jan, 2007 08:54 pm
Eva--

"On Line" Journalism makes a good entry on college admissins applications.
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Eva
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Jan, 2007 09:24 pm
I like the way you guys think. :wink:

Butrflynet, I bet you're the type who's always thinking up ways to grow things. (Takes one to know one.)
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Eva
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Jan, 2007 09:45 pm
ossobuco wrote:
Happy to hear of the growth there, Eva.


Here's a link I meant to add before, somewhat related -
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/01/04/BAG31NCF5E1.DTL&hw=censoring+student+paper&sn=002&sc=593


Interesting article, osso.

We have no such state law here. Most highschools go by Hazelwood School District vs. Kulhmeier (1988), giving school administraters virtually free rein to censor student publications.

From my own viewpoint (and I have expressed this repeatedly to the students), the school is paying the newspaper bills, so that puts it in the role of publisher. In the real world, the publisher always has ultimate veto power. (In one case here in Tulsa, the newspaper publisher and his wife bought a historic home and tore it down to build a McMansion on the site. The story made the national press, but of course, not a single word was ever printed about it in our newspaper.) I ask my students, "If you were paying to publish a newspaper out of your own pocket, would you want that newspaper to criticize you?" Of course they wouldn't.

As a new faculty member, I am learning the hot button issues so I can steer the students clear of them. And the Head of School is learning that, as publisher, he needs to actually READ the final proof before he approves it. Laughing
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Jan, 2007 09:49 pm
And that reminds me of a not so long ago story about a newspaper in Santa Barbara, CA - mass quittings by editors when the publisher was affecting the stories.
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Eva
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Jan, 2007 09:59 pm
I call it "The Politics of Free Speech."

Editors and publishers have to be on the same wavelength. If either pulls out, the publication folds. In theory, anyway. In practice, editors are considerably easier to replace.
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Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Jan, 2007 10:14 pm
Eva wrote:
I like the way you guys think. :wink:

Butrflynet, I bet you're the type who's always thinking up ways to grow things. (Takes one to know one.)


Yes, indeed I am. It is my most favorite thing to do, help people brainstorm and be a sounding board for their projects.

I wish I could make a living doing that!
0 Replies
 
Eva
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Aug, 2007 10:43 am
Things continue to improve and grow.

They were very happy with my work last year. They've asked me to start a middle school newspaper this year in addition to continuing the highschool paper.

I have 9 students who have signed up for the highschool elective class, and 10 taking the middle school elective. I have never worked with middle school students before (except SonofEva, of course, who resolutely refused to take any class his mother teaches...how embarrassing! Laughing )

This small, independent private school is growing by leaps and bounds. Last year they had 39 highschool students, this year it's 60. Last year they had 60 middle school students, this year it's 75. We are sharing classrooms until a new modular building arrives this fall.

Any hints & tips for working with middle school students would be most appreciated!
0 Replies
 
Eva
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Nov, 2007 05:10 pm
Nobody ever answered me, but I'm figuring it out on my own.

Mostly, I'm just bumping up this thread to answer littlek's question.




As long as I'm here, I'll update you. The fall Upper School Newspaper elective class now has 11 students and has produced 4 biweekly issues so far this semester. The Middle School class has 9 students and has produced 2 monthly isues so far. Both are popular among students and parents. So popular, in fact, that the school is having a difficult time affording enough full color copies to keep up with demand. We are going to start posting them online next semester as PDFs. People can print them off at home if they want a hard copy. This school is BIG on electronic communications.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Nov, 2007 05:47 pm
Sorry for not at least murmuring, but I'm no help, just wishing you the best in many ways on this.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Nov, 2007 08:11 pm
When I was in middle school, I remember me and my classmates being mostly interested in sports and ecology. We were just beginning to wake up and be aware of the opposite sex too.


Articles on various sports heros from the school, both past and present, would be of interest, as well as ongoing rivalry with other schools.

Articles on boy meets girl, girl meets boy how-tos would be of interest too. An advice column/rumors column would bring in more interest.

We also did a lot of community outreach with kids getting to go work at various industries. The school paper did interviews with them and the company owners/managers.
0 Replies
 
Eva
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Nov, 2007 09:53 pm
a
Oh! Thanks for the article suggestions, but I was actually looking for insights about working with groups of 11-13 year olds.

Ideas, they have! More than they can write, in fact. They've only published two issues, so the well hasn't even begun to run dry. In the November issue we published this week, for instance, they wrote articles on the following subjects (12 pages):

Groundbreaking Ceremony for new Middle School Building (front page)
Who Cleans the School?
Do You Remember 1st Grade?
A Day in the Life of "Mr. XXXXXX" (a favorite teacher)
Random Facts about Teachers and Faculty
CD Review: Daughtry (with Artist Profile in sidebar)
Interview with a Newspaper Staffer
Pro & Con: Immigration (1 article on each side of the issue)
Travel: Park City, Utah...A Hidden Wonder
CENTER PHOTO SPREAD: Halloween Dance
Cheerleading: Is it a Sport?
Mystery Interview (guess who this is)
Animals at the School
Sudoku
Chinchilla Facts (the school has 8 of them)
Game Review: Kingdom Hearts
What's Hot & What's Not
Restaurant Review: The Cheesecake Factory
Quarterback Corner (school sports coverage)
Drama Queens (and Kings) (about Drama class)
and
Editorial (why was a school policy changed?)
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Nov, 2007 12:44 am
I like the teaching tips on this website

http://middleschool.suite101.com/article.cfm/7_tips_for_the_first_day


Some more articles here

http://middle-school-life.suite101.com/


Help them learn to write book critiques to replace/supplement the old book report assignments... this is a good article for that

http://curriculalessons.suite101.com/article.cfm/become_a_book_critic



I really like this one. It is a great skill for journalists who do interviews...

http://curriculalessons.suite101.com/article.cfm/identifying_feelings_lesson_plan
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Nov, 2007 01:00 am
Here are a few more tips from other websites:


Here's a website with web resources for middle school students and teachers that you'll find useful:

http://teachingtoday.glencoe.com/howtoarticles/middle-school-web-resources

also

http://dermatology.slu.edu/spots/?D=9

Excerpt:

Quote:
The Adolescent Brain -Learning Strategies & Teaching Tips
The adolescent brain is still developing and therefore requires different brain compatible strategies for learning. This section describes the adolescent brain, details specific learning strategies in "Things to Know 1-5" and "Brain Compatible Strategies to for Increasing Learning," and offers practical tips for teaching teenagers in "Teaching Tips to Keep in Mind When Presenting."

Two factors strongly influence whether the brain pays attention to a piece of information:


If the information has meaning.
If the information causes an emotional response.
Meaning and emotion are crucial elements to grab the brain's attention and thereby aid learning. Learning in its simplest form is a process of building neural networks in the brain. These networks are formed in three different ways - through concrete experiences, symbolic learning, and abstract learning.


There's a lot more here
0 Replies
 
Eva
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Nov, 2007 09:47 pm
Thanks! I'm going to check those out!
0 Replies
 
IM3
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Jan, 2008 11:18 pm
Wow, I can't say how much just reading your posts in this forum have helped in my research.

Out of the blue, last week, the principle of my school asked me and the IT teacher to create and supervise a "multimedia" club that would be responsible for putting out a school newspaper and updating the school website regularly (which has not been changed in 8 months).

I was supposed to start an extra-curricular course next academic year (July 2008) for the newspaper, but I guess it has now been accelerated. Shocked

Just some interesting facts about my situation:

1.) This is my first year teaching ever.
2.) I am teaching English in Indonesia at a school that is in the top 10 of all schools in the country (excluding international schools).
3.) My background is in Banking/Finance, not even in English.
4.) Furthermore, because I am the ONLY native-English speaker, I have been thrown into the role of department head (unofficially, of course), which means spearheading all curriculum development for both middle- and high-school.
5.) Oh yeah! I have now been asked to accelerate the newspaper "class".

So many things to learn, and I have to submit the list of names of the student staff (which have not even been considered), technology needs, preliminary production schedule, etc. by WEDNESDAY (in 3 days).

I have taken many notes from the multitude of posts within this forum.

Anyway, I hope I can depend upon everyone's advice and experience to aid in this venture as I too am a seemingly under-qualified teacher, at least in the realm of newspaper creation.

Thanks in advance.
0 Replies
 
dagmaraka
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Jan, 2008 11:30 pm
wow, IM3. that is quite a workload!

welcome to a2k, i'm sure you'll find advice from our editors, writers, journalists and others very valuable. they will surely be along shortly.
0 Replies
 
 

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