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Dying young

 
 
Equus
 
Reply Thu 20 Apr, 2006 12:10 pm
How old can you be and still be considered to have "died young"?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 3,902 • Replies: 20
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Apr, 2006 12:12 pm
Tough question . . . you don't get any older than dead.
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gustavratzenhofer
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Apr, 2006 12:14 pm
75 for men. 92 for the bitches.
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Bella Dea
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Apr, 2006 12:17 pm
I think it's anything under 60.
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Apr, 2006 02:04 pm
I think the standard Biblical span is "fourscore and ten"--70 years.
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roger
 
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Reply Thu 20 Apr, 2006 02:17 pm
I think I was about 26.
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Wy
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Apr, 2006 05:56 pm
Noddy, I think a score is twenty. Fourscore and ten would be ninety... Maybe 70 is "dying young"!
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octane
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Apr, 2006 01:56 am
easy ...take it easy at 120
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Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Apr, 2006 05:55 am
I think that it has to do with your frame of reference. When I was younger, I probably would say 60. Now I think that dying before the age of 80 is "dying young"!
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George
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Apr, 2006 06:02 am
Whatever age I die at is gonna be way too young.
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Lash
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Apr, 2006 07:01 am
Younger than 50.

IMO.
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Apr, 2006 03:33 pm
Wy--

You're absolutely right. "Fourscore and ten" is the Gettysburg address. Three score and ten is the Biblical span.
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flushd
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Apr, 2006 03:39 pm
I've always thought if you died before 60: that's dying young.
However, my family has a bad reputation for leaving early with the a big bang.

It has always made me shutter though to hear condolences or sighs of "He/she was so young".
We're all too young to die!
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Anon-Voter
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Apr, 2006 03:43 pm
I'm already on borrowed time. Anything from here is bonus time!

Anon
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mrrobert
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 May, 2006 12:27 pm
You are still dying young if you are 63.
My parents are in their seventies. My mother reflected to me recently that the older she gets the older "old" gets. For instance, she does not consider 72 "old", but 85 is still old to her. She suspects that when she is in her 80's 85 will not seem old to her anymore.

Nonetheless, for me if someone dies at under 63, i feel inclined to say he died young, but if someone dies at 64 it seems to be within "normal" parameters. I make this assessment at age 39. I am certain at age 64, that will seem young to die.
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chris2a
 
  1  
Reply Sun 7 May, 2006 01:28 pm
It seem to me to be a culturally and socially biased perspective.
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edithdoll
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 May, 2006 06:17 pm
My two cousins died about six months apart, they were the youngest and oldest of four brothers. The youngest was 42 when he died of skin cancer, the oldest was 47 when he died from a heart attack. The chasms in my family have always echoed on losing them both "so young." Now though when I see some of the pictures of those deployed in the war(s), they look like such babies (i.e. in some cases barely old enough to drink), especially now that I'm sending these books overseas. So I guess it's all within your context/each situation how you define that expression.
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littleozzybloke
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Sep, 2006 05:14 am
Setanta wrote:
Tough question . . . you don't get any older than dead.



Cool verrrry good....can i borrow that?
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Asherman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Sep, 2006 08:56 am
"Young" is a relative term, so we have to have a second contrasting expected average mortality. When the average person died in their thirties, 15 would be half a lifetime. In those days infant morality was very high, and only about 1 of four infants lived to become adults. To die young in that context would probably have been considered death before 5 or 10 years of age.

Today when American men typically live to 85, middle age comes between 40 and 45. In this context dying young generally means that death occurred between the ages of 1 and 25. This is not only an Age when extended life is expected, it is also much more egalitarian than the past. The gap in the life expectancy of the lower socio-economic orders are about the same as for the wealthy privileged classes. That is a far cry from mortality statistics prior to the 19th century.

There are, of course, no hard and fast rules that govern the meaning of the term. It can mean pretty much what the speaker means it to. Death is as natural as being born, and no more to be feared or avoided. We cry both coming and going, and the world continues to spin.
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Equus
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Sep, 2006 10:13 am
Asherman wrote:
"Young" is a relative term, so we have to have a second contrasting expected average mortality.


You've noticed time moves faster the older you get? If you consider that at age two, a year is 50% of your experience, and at age 50, a year is 2% of your experience, etc. etc. , if you live to be 72, you have lived half of your "apparent" lifetime before your tenth birthday.
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