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Leftist candidate worries Mexican elite

 
 
el pohl
 
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Reply Sat 2 Dec, 2006 06:41 pm
Would you say the APPO has guts?

BTW, they are practically destroyed right?
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el pohl
 
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Reply Sat 2 Dec, 2006 07:59 pm
Jesús Reyes Heroles is a good man, but... Pemex? I find it weird.
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fbaezer
 
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Reply Mon 4 Dec, 2006 04:47 pm
APPO has guts.
Being gutsy doesn't mean more that being gutsy.
Khmer Rouge was gutsy, the Fasci di Combatimento were gutsy, just to give two examples.

I hope you are not confusing recently named Pemex director, and former Secretary of Energy under Zedillo, Jesús Reyes Heroles González Garza, with his famous father, the late Don Jesús Reyes Heroles, politician, ideologue and intellectual, -or his brother Federico Reyes Heroles, columnist of "Reforma" and one of the "Men in Black" who opine on Channel 11 TV.
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el pohl
 
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Reply Mon 4 Dec, 2006 09:48 pm
I know Federico (and respect him), and understand that his family is filled with politicians that, when having the Reyes-Heroles combination is a little confusing haha, but didn't know that this man was the former Secretary of Energy. It sounds coherent now! And, I imagine that his family is as "good people" as he seems to be... right?
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el pohl
 
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Reply Tue 5 Dec, 2006 10:37 am
Dang! Flavio Sosa, the APPO man is captured. Is this the end?

Me permitire poner esto en español aunque al buen Joe no le parezca jaja. Es un poco delicado decir quien es el "bueno" y el "malo" de esta pelicula, pero siempre tiene que haber uno, no? Ulises se ha de estar muriendo de la cura, y Sosa y Asociados estan viendo el final de otra manifestacion civil que, si bien se fue degenerando, tenia una razon de fondo importante. No puedo evitar sentirme un poco mal que este cuate este en la carcel (hasta Almoloya) y que otros MUCHO mas baquetones esten ahi, dirigiendo el país.

Por cierto, sedición??? Exactamente que fregados es eso? Suena muy Diaz Ordaz-esco.
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fbaezer
 
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Reply Tue 5 Dec, 2006 05:13 pm
Mixed feelings about Sosa. He certainly deserves what he's got, but I've always liked articulate people.
If only Ulises would fall too!

Pohl, sedición ("sedition") is one thing and disolución social ("social disolution") is another.

Sedición is organized violent uprising against legal authorities.
Disolución social in the times of Díaz Ordaz was a catch-it-all term concerning anyone opposing the government in any sense. Anything hindering the march of the Revolution was "disolución social".
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timberlandko
 
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Reply Tue 5 Dec, 2006 05:31 pm
el_pohl wrote:
Dang! Flavio Sosa, the APPO man is captured. Is this the end?

I'm really not all that familiar with Mexican politics, but I've sorta been following recent events in Mexico. I doubt that Sosa's arrest will be "The End"; as I understand it, APPO is more a loose confederation of broadly disparate groups having in common only opposition to Ruiz in particular and the Mexican Federal Government in general rather than a linearly higherarchical organiztion. To the best of my knowledge, APPO never has endorsed any one individual as a leader - nor really has it ever endorsed any cohesive platform - and it defied Sosa's requests to cool it in Oaxaca. What I see developing from the arrest of Sosa and the others is a power struggle within APPO - quite possibly rising to the level of internecine warfare.
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fbaezer
 
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Reply Tue 5 Dec, 2006 06:40 pm
You seem waaay more familiar with our politics than most Mexicans, Timber.

And I agree with your view.
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nimh
 
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Reply Sun 10 Dec, 2006 05:46 pm
Quote:
Mexicans Have Had Enough of López Obrador

Angus Reid Global Monitor : Polls & Research
December 10, 2006

Many adults in Mexico are disappointed with the actions of a losing presidential candidate, according to a poll by Parametría. 65 per cent of respondents disagree with Andrés Manuel López Obrador calling himself the legitimate president of the country.

Mexican voters chose their new president on Jul. 2. Official results placed Felipe Calderón of the National Action Party (PAN) as the winner with 36.68 per cent of all cast ballots, followed by López Obrador of the Democratic Revolution Party (PRD) with 36.11 per cent.

López Obrador filed an unsuccessful legal challenge to the election result, alleging widespread fraud. European Union (EU) election monitors did not report any irregularities in the vote count. The PRD candidate publicly refers to himself as "Mexico's legitimate president." [..]

Polling Data

Do you agree or disagree with Andrés Manuel López Obrador calling himself the legitimate president of Mexico?

16% Agree

65% Disagree

12% Neither

6% Not sure

Source: Parametría
Methodology: Interviews with 1,200 Mexican adults, conducted from Nov. 17 to Nov. 20, 2006. Margin of error is 2.8 per cent.
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