1
   

On the Outside Looking In

 
 
Treya
 
Reply Mon 6 Feb, 2006 12:16 pm
I titled this "On the Outside Looking In" because I was thinking about the complexity of the world we live in. How easy it is to live inside a bubble of our own idea's and thoughts and to look at everything else in life through that perspective. The problem with a bubble is that whether you are outside looking in or inside looking out things look distorted on the other side. People maintain a stance about something, sometimes forgetting there are other perspectives and that just because people see things from a different perspective that doesn't necessarily mean they are right or wrong. That is part of what makes life so interesting. Well, to me anyway. If we were all a bunch of robots programmed to think the same, act the same, say the same things what would be the point? Who we are is what makes us unique which is likeable to some, and not so likeable to others. It all seems to depend on how distorted things look to the person on the outside looking in.
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 627 • Replies: 5
No top replies

 
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Feb, 2006 12:42 pm
I believe there is a popular song about this by Don Ho called "tiny bubbles" however, one must wear the appropriate shirt when singing it.
0 Replies
 
Shapeless
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Feb, 2006 02:23 pm
Re: On the Outside Looking In
Quote:
...just because people see things from a different perspective that doesn't necessarily mean they are right or wrong.

Quote:
If we were all a bunch of robots programmed to think the same, act the same, say the same things what would be the point?


I'd like to think there's a middle ground between being programmed to think like everyone else, on one hand, and rampantly accepting all alternative views to be equally valid, on the other. I consider myself open-minded and am happy to hear what other people have to say about things, but I also think there is such thing as right and wrong. To err too much in either direction seems like a mistake--a moral one as well as a rhetorical one.
0 Replies
 
Treya
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Feb, 2006 02:29 pm
Quote:
I'd like to think there's a middle ground between being programmed to think like everyone else, on one hand, and rampantly accepting all alternative views to be equally valid, on the other. I consider myself open-minded and am happy to hear what other people have to say about things, but I also think there is such thing as right and wrong. To err too much in either direction seems like a mistake--a moral one as well as a rhetorical one.



Shapeless I believe there is a middle ground between being programmed to think like everyone else and rampantly accepting all alternative views to be equally valid. Please forgive me if what I said sounded like anything other than that. Truthfully my point was more on the level of accepting people for who they are despite their beliefs. Being willing to hear them, the things they are saying, not based on whether or not we necessarily agree with what they think or believe, but based purely on the fact that they are a person who's ideas are valid because they are capable of making decisions for themselves.

So what if their idea's are different than ours? Big whoop. Does that somehow make them less acceptable as a person just because we don't agree? I don't think so. Just my opinion though. I know I am guilty of not always getting right to the point in my posts, or using a lot of metaphors when I'm talking about something. I don't really mean to, it's just how my brain works sometimes. I see things for more than just face value and usually try to put them in a perspective that can be understood on a different level by those who read it. I don't know. I hope that makes sense... LOL
0 Replies
 
Ray
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Feb, 2006 10:58 pm
Yeah, well if their ideas make them do horrible stuff, then I must oppose them. Other than that, people can be the same or different, such things do not really matter.
0 Replies
 
fresco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Feb, 2006 02:17 am
hephzibah,

Some time ago we discussed the view that all "reality" was "social" in the sense of being "negotiated". This has even been extended to "science" by Kuhn in his description of "scientific paradigms".

The problem is that successful negotiation requires the intelligence to see the limitations of ones own conditioning. Unfortunately that level of intelligence is often absent.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

How can we be sure? - Discussion by Raishu-tensho
Proof of nonexistence of free will - Discussion by litewave
morals and ethics, how are they different? - Question by existential potential
Destroy My Belief System, Please! - Discussion by Thomas
Star Wars in Philosophy. - Discussion by Logicus
Existence of Everything. - Discussion by Logicus
Is it better to be feared or loved? - Discussion by Black King
 
  1. Forums
  2. » On the Outside Looking In
Copyright © 2022 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.05 seconds on 09/28/2022 at 11:48:50