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Fight Club

 
 
Ray
 
Reply Mon 2 Jan, 2006 10:15 pm
What do you think of this movie? I saw it the other night. I don't like the excessive violence and the Durden character, but I have to say that the movie is well directed. The soliloquy of the protagonist is probably what makes this movie interesting. There's a tone of hopelessness and of being asleep. While I wouldn't call this movie philosophical, it is disturbing. The Durden character annoys me so much when he tries to be philosophical by spitting out all these semi-existentialist/extremist view to justify his actions. The movie kinda feels like a satire toward catharsis, capitalism, and extremism. It sort of also feels satirical toward violence, because after seeing all the stupid violent and pornographic references and scenes, you feel that the whole movie is ridiculous. If that was what the director intended, I don't know, but I doubt that most audiences really think that way. Overall, while the poetic narrative and well directing intrigues me, the violence, vagueness, ridiculousness and the narcisstic view of the Durden character pulls the quality of this movie way down.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 1,034 • Replies: 18
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jacambece
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Jan, 2006 10:49 am
i love this movie and the book is pretty good too

Cambece
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Bella Dea
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Jan, 2006 10:54 am
Good movie. And if you feel that the Durden character pulled the movie down, you missed the point of the movie.
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Ray
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2006 01:04 pm
Well that's the thing. Are they really sending a message or is that just an attempt at making an action movie seem philosophical?

Can you tell me what you think the message is? Thanks. Very Happy
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Bella Dea
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2006 01:45 pm
Hey Ray, sorry I didn't welcome you the first round...I've been feeling poorly and it reflects sometimes. Embarrassed

The first rule of fight club is that you don't talk about fight club. Just kidding.

Anyway, the movie is about a schitzophrenic. Tyler is the alter ego. He's the "bad" personality. He is the character who makes the movie so twisted and bizarre because you find out that the Norton character has literally been kicking his own ass this whole time.
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Ray
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2006 03:01 pm
No hard feelings Bella.

Yeah, the schizophrenic stuff is apparent (I think he has some split personality disorder too). It's scary to wake up one day and find that you have this other personality that has been doing things you don't remember.

I guess maybe I was looking at the movie too hard.
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Bella Dea
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2006 03:02 pm
Ray wrote:
No hard feelings Bella.

Yeah, the schizophrenic stuff is apparent (I think he has some split personality disorder too). It's scary to wake up one day and find that you have this other personality that has been doing things you don't remember.

I guess maybe I was looking at the movie too hard.


If you didn't like it, you didn't like it. If we all liked the same stuff, life would sure be boring. :wink:
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Krekel
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 Jan, 2006 02:24 am
Bella Dea wrote:
The first rule of fight club is that you don't talk about fight club. Just kidding.


Very Happy
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2PacksAday
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Jan, 2006 10:55 pm
This is one of my favorite movies...as far as a clear message from the writer or director, there are so many things that the movie has to say, and many do conflict themselves...but that's part of the charm of the movie...it's all internal conflict but we really don't see that until the end when we find out two are really one, and all the conflicts make sense...well to a certain extent.

But if I had to choose one it would be this...Be true to yourself.

Jack {Nortons character} is totally lost as a individual, he feels that he has no true purpose in life, which leaves a gapping hole in his ego. He tries to fill this cavity with a Martha Stewart decorated apartment, and seeks out emotional fulfillment in support groups....places where he can "feel" something. But in reality he hates everything that Martha Stewart represents, as well as emotional involvement.

This is a common outlook among some of the men in my generation {gen X'ers}...we have had no great tragedy....The Depression, WWII, the 60's as a whole, or more specifically Vietnam, either protesting it or fighting in it.....to pull us together as a group. Do we serve a purpose?...besides buying the latest album or video game that is the newest thing or paying taxes so the social security train does not derail.

Many of us look at life as were just working and paying the bills, with no end to this except for death. Which is probably the truth, but we have a hard time dealing with it because we have grown up watching Mtv and such, and being barraged by commercialism in every single aspect of our lives. We think that we are expected to live the life of a rock star, sports star multi milloinare, driving the best cars, wearing the best cloths, having the best new gadget...and bedding the hottest girls with the best plastic surgery money can buy.

A large percent of us have been raised with divorced parents, or no father in the picture at all...many of us boys do not properly know how to be men. And for the most part are not allowed to be the stereotypical man, by the women that raised us. All we know about fathers is what we saw on tv shows such as Cosby and Growing Pains...which is far from the norm, and leads us to feeling underachieving.

If you find an old crappy looking couch that nobody else would want to own but you love it....buy it. If you fall for a girl that isn't a socially accepted beauty, love her anyway...marry her. If your car is ten years old and falling apart, and everyone stares as you drive into your burb, but you can't bear to part with it...don't.

Be yourself or you will never truly be happy, that's the point of Fight Club.

And a question if anybody stuck around thru all that

Were Ward Cleaver, or Mr Cunninham true represenatives of typical 50's fathers....I'd like to know.
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Endymion
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Jan, 2006 05:37 am
I really recommend the Fight Club soundtrack - by the Dust Brothers

I had to order it from the States - but it was well worth it.
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Bibliothekarin
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Feb, 2006 11:13 am
2PacksAday wrote:
Many of us look at life as were just working and paying the bills, with no end to this except for death. Which is probably the truth, but we have a hard time dealing with it because we have grown up watching Mtv and such, and being barraged by commercialism in every single aspect of our lives. We think that we are expected to live the life of a rock star, sports star multi milloinare, driving the best cars, wearing the best cloths, having the best new gadget...and bedding the hottest girls with the best plastic surgery money can buy.


This is so true that I've written an article on it. I think that we grow up with these impractical expectations implanted into our brains that we can't help but be disappointed and depressed in the end. I suppose that sounds rather ironic coming from an idealist like me, but it's true. Our generation (which I refer to as Generation MTV) has therefore become probably the most useless, irresponsible, and sad generation in history.


2PacksAday wrote:
If you find an old crappy looking couch that nobody else would want to own but you love it....buy it. If you fall for a girl that isn't a socially accepted beauty, love her anyway...marry her. If your car is ten years old and falling apart, and everyone stares as you drive into your burb, but you can't bear to part with it...don't.


Which is exactly why I still drive a car that is held together with bumperstickers. Also, I'm flat broke.

At any rate, I absolutely love Fight Club. The only problem is that I've seen it too much. Everytime someone comes over and looks at my DVD shelf, they spot it and say, "Ooh, let's watch Fight Club! Sadly, this is only made worse by the fact that most who watch it either don't notice or don't acknowledge the great social satire. They just watch it to see people get the snot beaten out of them and to catch a glimpse of Brad Pitt's abs.

Still, I'm willing to bet that this is a movie that will remain famous for decades to come. Who knows? Maybe the next generation will be studying satire in school and the teacher will whip out a copy of Fight Club. Well, it's unlikely, but still a good thought.
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Ray
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Feb, 2006 12:01 am
Quote:
This is so true that I've written an article on it. I think that we grow up with these impractical expectations implanted into our brains that we can't help but be disappointed and depressed in the end. I suppose that sounds rather ironic coming from an idealist like me, but it's true. Our generation (which I refer to as Generation MTV) has therefore become probably the most useless, irresponsible, and sad generation in history.


Hey wait a minute... Laughing

I agree with what you're saying. They have so much emphasis on things like "bling blings," expensive cars, sexual indulgences, and "gangster"... basically the stuff that 2packsaday had too.

But let's not get too general on the generation thing. :wink:

It's funny 'cause I kinda think that extreme non-conformism is also kinda troublesome. You got people thinking that looking different is the coolest thing when it really doesn't matter whether you look different or similar to anyone else.
Quote:


Quote:
Still, I'm willing to bet that this is a movie that will remain famous for decades to come. Who knows? Maybe the next generation will be studying satire in school and the teacher will whip out a copy of Fight Club. Well, it's unlikely, but still a good thought.


Apparently Eminem is mentioned in a psychology textbook, so pop culture is being examined in the classroom. I'm thinking that the Truman show might make it to the classroom (I like that movie).
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happytaffy
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Feb, 2006 01:43 pm
I love the film, the book was incredible as well. I actually recommend reading the book even if you weren't such a fan of the film.

I love any film you can watch over and over and still pic up litttel things everytime. Usual suspects reminds me of that.
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boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Feb, 2006 04:23 pm
I haven't seen the movie but I did like the book.

I wouldn't get all generational on this story - Palahniuk is well into his 40s, you know.
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babsatamelia
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Feb, 2006 04:59 pm
Ah Ha!! I was not aware that this movie was based on a book.
NOW one thing I absolutely adore, is reading the book that a
film is based upon. At times, I have read the book first and
the movie is a total let down (this happens SO much with John
Irving's book into film conversions with Lasse Halstrom for some
reason) but I have a feeling that in this case, the book will be
much better, get so much more detail. I thought the movie was
interesting, a little slice of life look at the urban apathetic sprawl.
I recently read a little book titled In The Cut before seeing
the film (being as I was in the hospital) and the ending in the book
totally SO PISSED ME OFF that I actually preferred the film
( a rare occurrence in my world)
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2PacksAday
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Feb, 2006 06:02 pm
Gen X's are hitting 40 now, if you go by the standard 1965-75 age range.

I need to get the book myself, the story of why the guy wrote the book is farily interesting on it's own.
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boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Feb, 2006 06:11 pm
The official unoffical word on the street is that it is really about Portland's underground gay sex clubs.

I think all of Palahnuik's books are interesting except for the last one. I liked "Lullabye" the best.
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2PacksAday
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Feb, 2006 06:54 pm
Well in the movie, there are a lot of gay undertones....especially after Jack moves in with Tyler..."The rest of the week we were like Ozzy and Harriet" something like that.

But after we find out that Jack and Tyler are the same person, I don't know what to think about scenes like that....maybe some really deep self love going on....narcissism would easily fit into Jack/Tylers personality.
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Chai
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Feb, 2006 07:47 pm
boomerang wrote:
The official unoffical word on the street is that it is really about Portland's underground gay sex clubs.

I think all of Palahnuik's books are interesting except for the last one. I liked "Lullabye" the best.


My favorite of his is "Choke" Something about it just blew me away.

Everyone, go out and read "Choke"......now. Laughing
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