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Happy Rosh Hashanah 5766!!!

 
 
jespah
 
Reply Wed 5 Oct, 2005 07:52 am
Okay, so you might not be Jewish. Well, that's okay. 5766 is the number of the new year. I guess it's the 60s all over again, eh? And this is New Year's Day or rather Days in Judaism.

Huh, you say? Well, you see, we celebrate New Year's for two days. Why? Well, it has to do with when it's the new year in Israel versus the rest of the world, but the gist of it is we have a fine old time of it over the course of two days rather than one like in the secular calendar.

Traditional foods are apples and honey, the idea is for you to have a sweet year. Honey cake is also served. We need a little protein to go with all of that, so brisket or chicken is also served. Wine-drinking is nice. A candle or candles can be lit. Or not, unless it's also the Sabbath (this year, neither day is).

Rosh Hashanah means "Head of the Year". Rosh means head and shanah is year. The Ha part of Hashanah means the.

A traditional Hebrew greeting is L'Shana Tova (Tov or Tova means good). It essentially means, you should have a good year.

It is a time for family, and for some prayer. A lot of synagogues are really crowded. Rosh Hashanah (and Yom Kippur, which is a week later) are considered the High Holy Days. Synagogue attendance is strongly encouraged if you are Reform (I am, so is RP), and more like mandatory if you are Conservative or Orthodox. I'm not sure about where it falls if you are a Reconstructionist.

The concept is also that you will be inscribed in the book of life for another year. That is another traditional greeting, May you be inscribed for another year. And on Yom Kippur (the Day of Atonement. Yom means day), your name is sealed in the book of life. Hence there's a small gap there of a week. One thing that is encouraged, before, during and after Yom Kippur, is to not only ask God for forgiveness but also your fellow human beings. The in-between week is one time where you can do this.

Every year, the Torah is read, and a passage is read at Synagogue every week. Every synagogue around the world follows the same schedule, so you can be in Buenos Aires one week, then in Tokyo, then in Jerusalem and then in Boston and, if you understand Hebrew, you should be able to easily follow along. We all pray in Hebrew (although the Reform movement means more vernacular is spoken during services, so a lot of prayers are translated. An American Reform service has a lot of English). The whole process starts over on Rosh Hashanah. Therefore, on Rosh Hashanah, the Torah passage is about the beginning of the universe, the creation myth.

The shofar is also blown. What's a shofar? It's a hollowed-out ram's horm. A lot of shofars are very old, and inlaid with ornate silver or have interesting inscriptions. Others are plain. Three different tones are played: T'kiyah, T'ruah and Sh'varim. I can't recall what each of them represents (someone will be along to help out, I'm sure), but the idea is to herald in the new year. Just as Abraham sacrificed a ram rather than his son, Isaac, just like Joshua and his army blew ram's horns in to make the walls of Jericho come tumbling down after Moses led us out of Egypt, so is a ram's horn significant.

This is a happy holiday. Come, have some sweets and a little wine, and enjoy the party. Smile L'chaim to all, regardless of religion and even if you don't have one and don't want one!
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Type: Discussion • Score: 11 • Views: 10,880 • Replies: 93

 
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Oct, 2005 08:07 am
Ah, Jes. We did a tribute to Rosh Hashanah on WA2K radio replete with songs for the occasion. Please inscribe me in your Book of Life, gal.
0 Replies
 
Chai
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Oct, 2005 08:13 am
I've always held more of an affinity towards Judaism then most other relegions, regardless of the fact I was raised Catholic.

I have quite a few reasons to believe my ancestors, not that many generations ago, were Jews that converted just to "pass".

Whatever the case, having a day of atonement means more to me than just going around saying "I've been forgiven"

Atonement is an action, involving making thins right, not just saying, forgive me.
0 Replies
 
colorbook
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Oct, 2005 08:37 am
Happy Rosh Hashanah jespah!
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Oct, 2005 10:24 am
Thank you! Smile

Chai, are you perhaps of Spanish (Spain, I mean) origin? Or Portuguese? 'Cause there were a lotta secret Jews in both countries during the Inquisition. I knew a gal when I was still practicing who was of Spanish origin and she recalled her grandmother taking out two candlesticks, lighting them every Friday night (with no prayers). "Granny, why do you do that?" "Oh, I don't know, it's just a family tradition."

T___ was sure that they (they were Catholic) had been Jews a few hundred years ago, and had kept the secret for so long that it had been forgotten. Yet lighting candles every Friday night remained.

In other news, there should be a big matzoh ball dropped in Times Square. I would absolutely go and see that.
0 Replies
 
Chai
 
  2  
Reply Wed 5 Oct, 2005 11:02 am
jespah wrote:
Thank you! Smile

Chai, are you perhaps of Spanish (Spain, I mean) origin? Or Portuguese? 'Cause there were a lotta secret Jews in both countries during the Inquisition. I knew a gal when I was still practicing who was of Spanish origin and she recalled her grandmother taking out two candlesticks, lighting them every Friday night (with no prayers). "Granny, why do you do that?" "Oh, I don't know, it's just a family tradition."

T___ was sure that they (they were Catholic) had been Jews a few hundred years ago, and had kept the secret for so long that it had been forgotten. Yet lighting candles every Friday night remained.

In other news, there should be a big matzoh ball dropped in Times Square. I would absolutely go and see that.


No, wouldn't be Sephardic, all my grandparents were born in Poland.

I just find a few things strange.

My grandmother on my fathers side came to the U.S. all alone when she was only 13 years old - that's another story.
This was back in the 1920's, of course before WWII, BUT, she would tell me stories when I was a little girl, one of them being that at least one of her sisters died in a concentration camp during WWII. Now I know that not only Jews died there, but when I would ask her about that time and the Jews she would always adamently say "There are NO Jews in Poland"!

I remember later bringing this up to her again, and she got really mad, telling me there were no Jews in Poland, and never had been. Confused

Also, the foods she ate. Even though she came here very young, until the day she died she had a very heavy accent and really kept to the old ways.

She lived next door to us, so I was there almost every day. It just seemed everything she made had that certain taste. Do you know what I mean?
Then, there are those personality traits that today we're not supposed to talk about if you want to remain PC. But she was my grandma and I really loved her and she acted just like every old Jewish woman I meet later in life. I just can't say it any better than that. I loved her humor and her intelligence, and the way she spoke her mind.

My family line is shrouded in secrets. No one seems to know anything past that generation.
When I'd ask my mother, she'd say "we don't talk about things like that" Confused

Now my mother, if she wasn't separated at birth from her identical twin Shelly Winters, I'll eat my hat. Oy.

Sophie? who named their kid Sophie in 1924?
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doglover
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Oct, 2005 11:24 am
Happy Rosh Hashanah jespah and to everyone celebrating this holiday!
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Oct, 2005 11:33 am
A New Year and New Beginnings.

Let's drink to Life.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Oct, 2005 12:21 pm
HAPPY ROSH HASHANAH, LOVELY JEWISH PEEPS!!

My supervisor asked me into her office to view an e-mail Rosh Hashanah greeting from a friend in Israel. It was really breathtaking photos of Israel--the surrounding landscape--the city of Jerusalem--all the while a guy is chanting and sounding the shofar. It was really lovely. I'm constantly humbled by the history of the area and the people.

Peace and good fortune in the New Year!!

Specially you, jes, and thinking of cav.
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Oct, 2005 01:44 pm
Thank you, my friends. Smile

Now I'm suddenly craving pierogies. Chai, do you know how to make them? I can only reheat the frozen ones from the box. I bet the authentic kind are amazing.

My grandmother (mother's side) was of Polish extraction. She was born in NY, it was apparently her mother who'd had the accent. My Baba (that's Polish for grandmother, yes?) spoke with a Noo Yawk accent. And she made the most amazing potato knishes. I mean, I can still taste them, and she has been dead since, if I recall correctly, 1971.

None of us know how to make the knishes. But, there's interesting proof that they really did exist. A few years ago, I think it was before I got married so we're probably talking early 90s or late 80s, we got my folks' old home movies put on VHS. Well, one was a movie from my mother's Sweet 16 party. And there's Baba, taking her late lamented potato knishes out of the oven! Smile

I miss her, don't remember her quite as well as my grandfather. I've been told by more than one family member that I look like her, and that always makes me proud and happy.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Oct, 2005 01:53 pm
<Babka means grandmother in polish, I think.>
0 Replies
 
Chai
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Oct, 2005 01:57 pm
jespah wrote:
Thank you, my friends. Smile

Now I'm suddenly craving pierogies. Chai, do you know how to make them? I can only reheat the frozen ones from the box. I bet the authentic kind are amazing.

My grandmother (mother's side) was of Polish extraction. She was born in NY, it was apparently her mother who'd had the accent. My Baba (that's Polish for grandmother, yes?) spoke with a Noo Yawk accent. And she made the most amazing potato knishes. I mean, I can still taste them, and she has been dead since, if I recall correctly, 1971.

None of us know how to make the knishes. But, there's interesting proof that they really did exist. A few years ago, I think it was before I got married so we're probably talking early 90s or late 80s, we got my folks' old home movies put on VHS. Well, one was a movie from my mother's Sweet 16 party. And there's Baba, taking her late lamented potato knishes out of the oven! Smile

I miss her, don't remember her quite as well as my grandfather. I've been told by more than one family member that I look like her, and that always makes me proud and happy.


Pierogies? Oh hell, what kind do you want? Pot cheese? Potato? Kapusta?

Unless you going to make about 50, it's not worth the trouble, but they do beat the frozen ones by a mile.

My mothers mother was the one we called Babcia. She came to stay with us a few times a year.

My grandma would fry fish roe (I grew up at a marina) I never knew how expensive that stuff was until I tried to buy some in a gourmet shop once.
0 Replies
 
colorbook
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Oct, 2005 02:00 pm
I used to work near a deli that made homemade potato knishes...they were quite large, so if you ate two at lunch, you would be full for the rest of the day Laughing


I don't know how to make pierogies, but I know you can usually buy them freshly made at a bakery. (Sooo much tastier than the frozen ones from the box...in fact, I wouldn't even call them pierogies). I usually cook them in a frying pan with margarine or butter, some chopped onion and fry them just slightly crispy...now I'm craving them too :wink:
0 Replies
 
husker
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Oct, 2005 02:02 pm
Happy Rosh Hashanah back to you Jespah
0 Replies
 
Chai
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Oct, 2005 02:20 pm
Walter Hinteler wrote:
<Babka means grandmother in polish, I think.>


Babka is a sweet bread!!!

But yes, Polish.

Grandmother is Babcia.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Oct, 2005 02:38 pm
Chai Tea wrote:
Babka is a sweet bread!!!


Baba

Babka is grand-aunt or ... grandmother: babcia, babka: grandmother

:wink:
0 Replies
 
Chai
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Oct, 2005 02:41 pm
Walter Hinteler wrote:
Chai Tea wrote:
Babka is a sweet bread!!!


Baba

Babka is grand-aunt or ... grandmother: babcia, babka: grandmother

:wink:


We're BOTH right!

I looked it up in a polish/english dictionary, and it says....Woman, grandmother, CAKE, crone....

It's got raisens and nuts in it, but then again, I'm sure my grandmother did too! Laughing
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George
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Oct, 2005 03:16 pm
http://www.holidays.net/highholydays/images/pixcandlx.gif

May you have a wonderful year!
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Chai
 
  2  
Reply Wed 5 Oct, 2005 03:41 pm
Wow, this is the most fun I've ever had on a R&S thread!

Jews Rule! Laughing Laughing
0 Replies
 
Chai
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Oct, 2005 03:49 pm
Not sure what it has to do with the holiday, but it's funny....

http://www.cardsinadvance.com/cards/ROSH/big/3.gif
0 Replies
 
 

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