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Jewish Year 5769

 
 
gollum
 
Reply Mon 13 Oct, 2008 01:15 pm
On the Jewish calendar we are in the year 5769.

What occurred 5769 years ago? Who was around to record it?
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Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 4,693 • Replies: 9
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Green Witch
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Oct, 2008 01:22 pm
@gollum,
Here's a good site to start:

http://www.worldtimelines.org.uk/world/asia/9000-5000BC

There was not much recording going on. Most of the history is derived from archeology.
0 Replies
 
CoastalRat
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Oct, 2008 01:24 pm
I was the one who was around to record what happened back then to initiate the start of the Jewish calendar. I would tell you what that was, but by memory isn't what it used to be.
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ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Oct, 2008 01:33 pm
@gollum,
Quote:
The Jewish calendar's reference point is traditionally held to be about one year before the Creation of the world.


Quote:
Epoch

The Jewish calendar uses a calendar era anno mundi ("in the year of the world"), abbreviated AM. Interestingly, the beginning of "year 1" is not Creation, but about one year before Creation. This caused the new moon of its first month (Tishrei) to be called molad tohu (the mean new moon of chaos or nothing).

The Jewish calendar's epoch (reference date), 1 Tishrei 1 AM, is equivalent to Monday, October 7 3761 BCE in the proleptic Julian calendar, the equivalent tabular date (same daylight period) and is about one year before the traditional Jewish date of Creation on 25 Elul AM 1, based upon the Seder Olam Rabbah of Rabbi Yossi ben Halafta, a second century CE sage. Thus, adding 3760 before Rosh Hashana or 3761 after to a Julian or Gregorian year number after 1 CE will yield the Hebrew year. For earlier years there may be a discrepancy (see: "Missing Years" in the Hebrew Calendar).

The Jewish year starting on Rosh Hashanah, 1 Tishrei, 5769 AM is equivalent to 29 September 2008.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hebrew_calendar
0 Replies
 
squinney
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Oct, 2008 01:53 pm
So, the Jewish faith believes the world is only 5769 years old?
Phoenix32890
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Oct, 2008 01:57 pm
@squinney,

Quote:
The year number on the Jewish calendar represents the number of years since creation, calculated by adding up the ages of people in the Bible back to the time of creation. However, this does not necessarily mean that the universe has existed for only 5700 years as we understand years. Many Orthodox Jews will readily acknowledge that the first six "days" of creation are not necessarily 24-hour days (indeed, a 24-hour day would be meaningless until the creation of the sun on the fourth "day"). For a fascinating (albeit somewhat defensive) article by a nuclear physicist showing how Einstein's Theory of Relativity sheds light on the correspondence between the Torah's age of the universe and the age ascertained by science, see The Age of the Universe.


http://www.jewfaq.org/calendar.htm

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jespah
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Oct, 2008 04:19 pm
@squinney,
Yeah, but the first 6 days were super-long. You could argue that they took a good 5 billion years or so. Very fluid interpretations, at least that's what I've always heard.
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Sat 19 Sep, 2009 04:15 am
@jespah,
L'shanah tovah
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Sep, 2009 02:14 pm
@ehBeth,
Muchos gracias! Smile
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  2  
Reply Sun 20 Sep, 2009 06:33 pm
Good Yontif, y'all, each and every one.
0 Replies
 
 

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