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Ireland

 
 
Peti MC
 
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2005 08:27 am
I see alot of people claiming to be part-Irish. Anyone wanna learn the real truth about Ireland if so post a message up here.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 6,421 • Replies: 89
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ConstitutionalGirl
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2005 02:10 pm
If your so Irish, "than why are you so in to rap!" From you language, you seem all fake.
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Bi-Polar Bear
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2005 02:12 pm
Ireland has beaches.
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Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2005 02:23 pm
CG,

rap is popular in the UK these days...
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Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2005 02:24 pm
Yes I would love to know the truth about Ireland Peti

And who is going to tell me?
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2005 05:41 pm
You don't need a Paddy to know which way the wind is blowin' . . . if it's blowin' from the shabeen, you'll smell it before you get there.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2005 05:48 pm
News flash for CG: "rap" is popular in Ireland, for whatever idiotic stereotype you may cherish.

News flash for RP: Ireland is not a part of the UK.
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Peti MC
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2005 11:56 pm
Cheers for that Senta. I'll tell you's the truth. Ireland is the most divided, sectararian, racist country there is at the moment. Statitstics show that i will be probably dead in a year. I'll be back with more info later but will leave you's with a question. Do you's know who the IRA are?
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2005 11:58 pm
We know all too well . . . the earliest form of the IRA arose in America from the Fenian Brotherhood, and invaded Canada in 1866 and 1871. Since their rise in Ireland, they've gotten a good deal of support from the Irish in America, and Irish Americans, chiefly through an organization known as Northern Aid.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2005 11:59 pm
Does that mean you live in Norn Iron?
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Peti MC
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2005 01:04 am
Setanta now you're just writing before your thinking. The IRA did not arise in America, General Michael Collins started the IRA and they did not get any backings from the Americians in their war in 1917.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2005 01:07 am
Peti MC wrote:
Setanta now you're just writing before your thinking. The IRA did not arise in America, General Michael Collins started the IRA and they did not get any backings from the Americians in their war in 1917.


He certainly did, and your response shows that

a) you didn't read what Set wrote,

b) your knowledge about history isn't the very best.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2005 06:24 am
From Houghton-Mifflin's "Readers Companion to American History":

Quote:
The Fenian Brotherhood, founded in New York City by John O'Mahony in 1858, was a sister organization to the Irish Revolutionary Brotherhood organized in Dublin by James Stephens in the same year. Its aim was to rid Ireland of English rule by providing American money and manpower to encourage insurrection. By 1865 it had attracted 250,000 followers, many of them Civil War veterans, and an Irish Republican government on the American model had been set up at Philadelphia.

Fenianism, however, also spawned dissident factions hoping to benefit from Anglo-American conflict by attacking Canada. On April 12, 1866, an attempt to seize the Canadian island of Campobello in the Bay of Fundy was thwarted at Eastport, Maine. The British and American navies cooperated in intercepting a shipment of arms, and U.S. troops under Maj. Gen. George Meade forced the Fenians gathered at Eastport to disperse. On June 1, Col. John O'Neill defeated a Canadian militia company before retreating to Buffalo. O'Neill's second foray into Canada, on May 25, 1870, was easily repelled. Stephens, fleeing from the threat of arrest in Ireland, arrived in New York on May 10, 1866. Denouncing the attacks on Canada, he ousted O'Mahony from the leadership of the movement and reasserted the goal of insurrection on Irish soil alone. Betrayed by police informants, this goal ended in small sporadic rural uprisings on March 5-6, 1867. Fenianism collapsed in both countries, but Irish nationalism had taken on an irrevocable American dimension.


Additionally:

Answers-dot-com wrote:
There are a few references to the Fenian troops who crossed the Niagara River near Buffalo calling themselves the "Irish Republican Army" including a painting of the battle in the National Archives of Canada showing a green flag with the letters IRA over a gold harp. This is considered to be the first ever use of the term.


Perhaps you should research before you write.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2005 06:33 am
Although the image is of poor quality, and the artist's conception of the appearance of the battle of Ridgeway is fanciful, the image below, from the Canadian War Museum, shows the painting referred to in my post above:

http://www.warmuseum.ca/cwm/chrono/images/fenian_raids.jpg
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Peti MC
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2005 07:27 am
Ok i got it wrong but that is just the history how good is your view of Ireland now Set?
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2005 07:32 am
What do you mean by "how good is your view?"

If you mean how current, apart from frequently visiting P45Rant.com, i've not visited Ireland since 1978. I understand that the country has profoundly changed since then.

You need to make clearer your question before i can answer it.
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Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2005 09:47 am
Set wrote:
News flash for RP: Ireland is not a part of the UK.

apparently northern ireland is.

from Dictionary.com:

United Kingdom or United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (Commonly called Great Britain or Britain.) (Abbr. UK)
    A country of western Europe comprising England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. Beginning with the kingdom of England, it was created by three acts of union: with Wales (1536), Scotland (1707), and Ireland (1800). At the height of its power in the 19th century it ruled an empire that spanned the globe. London is the capital and the largest city. Population: 59,600,000.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2005 09:50 am
Actually, six counties of Ulster's nine are still occupied by the foreign invader, yes.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2005 11:44 am
I'd thought, Cavan, Donegal, and Monaghan are part of Northern Ireland (or Ulster Province, if you prefer that terminology).
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Peti MC
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2005 12:51 pm
Nope at least i can answer this one correctly Cavan, Donegal, and Monaghan are only classified as being in Ulster in the GAA league otherwise they are in the republic.
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