0
   

Does "they came out of the matter with little credit" mean "there is little credit for the matter"?

 
 
Reply Mon 28 Sep, 2020 06:19 am
Does "they came out of the matter with little credit" mean "they said there is little credit for the matter"?


The matter was not mended by the interposition of Mr. E. J. Dingwall of the London S.P.R., who proclaimed the truth of the mediumship in enthusiastic private letters, but denied his conviction at public meetings. These so-called "experts" cache out of the matter with little credit, but more than two hundred common-sense sitters had wit enough and honesty enough to testify truly as to that which occurred before their eyes. The author may add that he has himself sat with Mrs. Crandon and has satisfied himself, so far as one sitting could do so, as to the truth and range of her powers.
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Question • Score: 0 • Views: 136 • Replies: 2
No top replies

 
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Sep, 2020 06:53 am
@solesoul,
I read "credit" here as meaning they did not earn their reputation as "experts" which is why that is in quotes. The implication is that their performance was very sub standard for someone who claims expertise and "credit" is similar to "trust" here. They did not earn the trust of their listeners.
solesoul
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Sep, 2020 07:07 am
@engineer,
THANKS.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
  1. Forums
  2. » Does "they came out of the matter with little credit" mean "there is little credit for the matter"?
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 10/20/2021 at 08:36:21