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Who is Attracted by Bright Shiny Objects-Men or Women?/mater

 
 
Chai
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 10:10 am
spendius wrote:
But CT there is no comparison between the glow that bronze gives to that which gold produces.


I guess then I really don't care.
Gold doesn't attract me,
Actually I don't wear any jewelry, except for my wedding band.
Not even a watch.

I do like shiny fingernail though.
I try to keep myself manicured and love OPI nail colors

Winter is Symphony in Bronze, and I'm Not Really a Waitress Red

Warmer weather is Ti'tan' Your Toga, Greece Just Blue Me Away, or a deep violet or saltwater taffy green.
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Sanctuary
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 10:37 am
sozobe wrote:
You may be sensing a theme with me, but:

There is no universal. Some women are more materialistic than some men, some men are more materialistic than some women. I think the advertising industry is figuring out they can get men all het up about things they've historically gotten women het up about, and so, seeing dollar signs, are doing what they can to get 'em het up. Successfully.


Agreed.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 11:01 am
I agree that shiny object liking, and what exact shiny object, depends on the particular person and not the gender.

I'm a woman who tends to like clothes with good lines in greyed-non-dayglo colors, and simple jewelry - except another part of the time, I am crazed for dangly earrings that sparkle plenty, and even wear a rather gross palm tree pin made of painted rubber with fat glass jewels encrusted on it, which I purchased at a store on Venice Beach called "Reckless Woman".

I tend to like objects in general as a kind of visual art; not only for themselves, but how they look in the composition of my visual field, what they are next to, how the picture balances, or lists, as the case may be. (I hear murmurs of "she's nuts!") This sort of thing entertains me all the time. Oh, look at the bmw convertible next to that lumber company truck.... they're both red!
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spendius
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 11:51 am
Ossie

I wouldn't tell your therapist about how the "Reckless Woman" idea got your attention out of all those thousands of other shops.He might pin you to the wall.
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nimh
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 01:27 pm
"bright shiny glittering objects"... all I'll say is: if you're on mushrooms, do not, by any account, go into one of those gadget shops with meaningless glittery trinkets.
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ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 01:43 pm
boys and their toys

shiny cars
shiny hubcabs
shiny audio stuff
shiny chunky gold bracelets
shiny chunky white metal watches
shiny women with the bits they've bought for them


boys
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spendius
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 01:45 pm
That constitutes unwarranted over indulgence Beth!
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extra medium
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 04:45 pm
Her eyes did shine and sparkle in the moonlit night. Stardust glittered in her hair, it seemed. Even her lips and teeth had a dark glow. Was this heaven, or was this yet another beautiful demon?

____
I used to paint my shiny stuff flat black. For example I had a nice shiny mountain bike. And I'd paint it flat black.

Paint it black, as it were.

Painting a shiny woman or shiny man flat black? Some do that, to see if they are only gold plated, or solid gold.

Shiny things are nice. Its all an illusion anyway, is it not?

So I suppose shiny things are no more a shallow illusion than a lump of coal is an illusion.
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spendius
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 04:57 pm
That's a bit hasty EM.
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extra medium
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 05:00 pm
spendius wrote:
e.M.

During my long and often fruitless quest to relieve myself of the burdens of ennui without recourse to the palliatives offered by various organised institutionalised interests which are,as you might have guessed,as useless as they are expensive,I happened upon a nice little book,a gem in fact,which purported to tell the true story of Captain Bligh and his trials in your neck of the woods when he was entrusted by the British Government with the task of providing a supply of banana plants which it was hoped would satisfy the demand for a cheap foodstuff with which to feed the slaves in the region now known as the West Indies.

A section of the book dealt with the provisioning of The Bounty in England to ready it for its journey which,as you will know if you have seen the movie,
did not turn out quite as planned.

The author had studied the Admiralty records and extracted from them a detailed list of the items which were deemed to be essential for the trip in view of the fact that space and weight were at a premium.Naturally, gifts with which our valiant Captain hoped to ingratiate himself with any aboriginals he might meet in order to ensure their co-operation were included.and in quite large quantities.This particular item on the lading manifesto is quite pertinent to your enquiry.There were large quantities of spades,pick-axes and similar items a fuller list of which can be found in Roget under Agriculture sub section 'farm tool' for the men and barrel after barrel of those objects which can be elucidated from the Thesaurus under headings such as 'baubles','bangles' and 'beads' all of which owe their magnetism to the shine that has been imparted to them in the workshops in which they are manufactured.These were for the women which is hardly surprising in view of the fact that it is difficult to ingratiate one self with women with those items which come under 'farm tools' and the Admirality were officially cognisant of this from their observation of women within its own purview
and obviously projected this knowledge into those realms where it was necessary to guess.

In other words EM the riddle you pose has been clarified these 200 years or more and even a casual look around a modern shopping centre is sufficient to prove scientifically that no revision of the principles applied by the Admiralty are in any way useful.

I don't know what modern psychologists make of these matters but for my own part when I see a man sporting shiny objects on his person,or any other decorative strategies,I make sure I am within a stride or two of a good solid wall to which I can press my back in the event he makes any sudden or surprising movements.It is not the same with ladies of course.Shiny objects surrounding the person of a Lady signify,and I have found no exceptions to this rule,a propensity to look with favour on gentlemen with land or share certificates and such like and,as one descends the class hierarchy,as one is often forced to do,the simple sound of currency notes being riffled as one does with a pack of cards.

I'm sorry to have gone on at such length but I think your study is an important one and will be of great benefit to any young men reading your thread who are starting out in life with only their Mums notions of what is right and proper to go on.


This is good to know. Yes, I obviously must study classical knowledge in this area some more. Interesting lessons can be learned from the past sometimes. Just a matter of putting it into proper context today.
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extra medium
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 05:04 pm
Chai Tea wrote:


Anyway, moving on....
EM - when you say shiny objects, are you speaking of objects of quality or just in general?

You've got trailer trash shiny and Harry Winston shiny, as well as a million levels in between.

Or, are you just talking about material things in general?


Oh yes, the highest possible quality of everything. Do you love it?
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extra medium
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 05:08 pm
ossobuco wrote:

I'm a woman who tends to like clothes with good lines in greyed-non-dayglo colors, and simple jewelry - except another part of the time, I am crazed for dangly earrings that sparkle plenty, and even wear a rather gross palm tree pin made of painted rubber with fat glass jewels encrusted on it, which I purchased at a store on Venice Beach called "Reckless Woman".


Duly recorded and noted. Our researchers are trying to decide whether this should be classified as a norm of a certain group of the female faction, or could this be an outlier. Continuing...
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Sanctuary
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 05:19 pm
My dad had a spoon collection.

I, too, like spoons.

Perhaps attraction to shiny things is not gender-based, but in fact hereditary? Surprised :wink:
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spendius
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 05:25 pm
Mentally or physically.One can easily inherit a load of foolish ideas.
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ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 05:26 pm
Or stamps.
Some people inherit stamps.
They're not usually shiny.
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extra medium
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 05:52 pm
I appreciate things that were put together well.

You know, things that someone had to think about long and hard to design, then when they put it together, they had to do it meticulously and with utmost care. Sometimes re-doing it several times, back to the drawing board perfectionists.

I like a really sick ultra nice car. I mean among the best in the world. Among human illusions, they are pretty good. Just looking at the countless hours that went into designing, building, dreaming, fussing, re-doing it, making it all work and come out so wickedly efficient and mean.

I don't even need to own it. I think I appreciate the work (mental and physical), discipline, thought that it took to produce it.

Like what? A violin?
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Jun, 2005 07:18 pm
Oh, yes. Violins. I've talked about them on a2k before - I got to go through the Stradivarius museum in Cremona, and heard them check the tone (I think) of the individually gorgeous antique violins by playing a short muscial sequence on each. I was the only visitor and very happy, even though it was only 9 a.m. and I was half asleep climbing the stairs to the violin exhibition room.

However, I am a complete dullard about music, possessor of totally lousy pitch, and ignorant besides - and I can only imagine the pleasure that would be for a real musician. My experience was the aesthetic Space in Time of the the episode.
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