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Justice Scalia says war justifies rights' recess

 
 
Reply Wed 19 Mar, 2003 12:16 am
UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS, Ohio (March 18, 2003 11:06 p.m. EST) - The government has room to scale back individual rights during wartime without violating the Constitution, Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia said Tuesday.

"The Constitution just sets minimums," Scalia said after a speech at John Carroll University in suburban Cleveland. "Most of the rights that you enjoy go way beyond what the Constitution requires."

Scalia, one of the court's most conservative judges, was responding to a question about the Justice Department's pursuit of terrorism suspects and whether their rights are being violated.

Scalia did not discuss what rights he believed are constitutionally protected, but said that in wartime, one can expect "the protections will be ratcheted right down to the constitutional minimum. I won't let it go beyond the constitutional minimum."

Scalia was interrupted once briefly by a protester who shouted an anti-war statement. The protester was removed from the room by security officers but was not arrested.

Scalia stopped speaking during the scuffle, then joked that the protest probably was more interesting than his topic, which was the constitutional protection of religions.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 2,066 • Replies: 9
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au1929
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Mar, 2003 08:01 am
Think about it if Bush has his way Scalia will be the next chief justice. In addition he is Bush's idea of an ideal supreme court justice. Imagine the results if Bush is able to stack the supreme court using Scalia as a model.
0 Replies
 
maxsdadeo
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Mar, 2003 08:03 am
Yeah, goldie.

The Constitution would be interpreted as saying what the framers meant.

No more social engineering.

Wouldn't it be grand.
0 Replies
 
au1929
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Mar, 2003 09:11 am
Max
Quote:
The Constitution would be interpreted as saying what the framers meant.


As interpreted by the radical right.
0 Replies
 
au1929
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Mar, 2003 11:35 am
[code]Scalia bans broadcast media from free speech eventCLEVELAND [/code](AP) — Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia banned broadcast media from an appearance Wednesday where he will receive an award for supporting free speech.
The City Club usually tapes speakers for later broadcast on public television, but Scalia insisted on banning television and radio coverage, the club said. Scalia is being given the organization's Citadel of Free Speech Award.
"I might wish it were otherwise, but that was one of the criteria that he had for acceptance," said James Foster, the club's executive director.
The ban on broadcast media "begs disbelief and seems to be in conflict with the award itself," C-SPAN executive Terry Murphy wrote in a letter last week to the City Club. "How free is speech if there are limits to its distribution?"
The club previously gave its award to former U.S. Sen. John Glenn after his retirement in 1998 in recognition of his opposition to a consitutional amendment to flag-burning.
The City Club selected Scalia because he has "consistently, across the board, had opinions or led the charge in support of free speech," Foster said. The proclamation applauds Scalia for protecting free speech in several Supreme Court cases, including voting to strike down a Texas flag-burning ban.
Cameras and recording devices are banned from the Supreme Court chamber, and Scalia prefers not to have camera coverage in other settings, said Kathleen Arberg, spokeswoman for the court.
Scalia made the same demand on John Carroll University, where he spoke Tuesday night. He talked mostly about the constitutional protection of religions, but also said that government has room to scale back individual rights during wartime without violating the Constitution.
"The Constitution just sets minimums," Scalia said. "Most of the rights that you enjoy go way beyond what the Constitution requires."
0 Replies
 
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Mar, 2003 01:58 pm
Scalia requests ban on broadcast media at talk
Scalia requests ban on broadcast media at talk
03/19/03
Stephen Koff and James F. McCarty
Plain Dealer Reporters

C-SPAN, the cable television network popular with political junkies and insomniacs, is outraged that the City Club of Cleveland has banned broadcast media from covering today's speech by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.

Especially galling, says C-SPAN, is that Scalia is coming to the club to collect its Citadel of Free Speech Award.

The ban on broadcast media, demanded by Scalia, "begs disbelief and seems to be in conflict with the award itself," C-SPAN Vice President and Executive Producer Terry Murphy wrote in a letter last week to the City Club. "How free is speech if there are limits to its distribution?"

Scalia made the same demand on John Carroll University, where he spoke last night, a university spokeswoman said.

Reporters and newspaper photographers attended the speech in the school's gymnasium. But the only video camera on hand belonged to the college's television station.

Shortly after Scalia began speaking, a young man in a T-shirt emblazoned with a peace sign stood in the balcony and read loudly from a prepared statement. Security guards escorted him away.

Scalia, who began his law career in Cleveland in 1961, spoke mainly about religious clauses in the Constitution. Afterward, he entertained questions from the audience.

With war looming in the Middle East, he did not mention Iraq or Saddam Hussein, and only alluded to President Bush - in whose election Scalia played a key role in ratifying.

In response to a student's question, Scalia said it was "a wonderful feeling" to have led the Supreme Court's rejection of a recount of the Florida vote, thus handing the election to Bush.

The City Club, which is hosting Scalia's speech at noon today at the Marriott at Key Center downtown, regularly hosts appearances by public figures. The club tapes its Friday Forum speakers for later broadcast on public television station WVIZ. But Scalia insisted on banning television and radio coverage as a condition of his appearance.

"I might wish it were otherwise, but that was one of the criteria that he had for acceptance," said James Foster, the club's executive director. Cameras and recording devices are banned from the Supreme Court chamber, and Scalia "usually prefers not to have camera coverage" in other settings, said Kathleen Arberg, spokeswoman for the court.

The City Club selected Scalia for its Citadel of Free Speech Award because he has "consistently, across the board, had opinions or led the charge in support of free speech," Foster said.
0 Replies
 
nelsonn
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Mar, 2003 11:42 pm
Why is anyone surprised at what this dinosaur says?
0 Replies
 
maxsdadeo
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Mar, 2003 01:03 am
Hey!

BumbleBeeBoogie has as much right to post as anyone.

And I don't know if I would call him a dinosaur, but you are perfectly free to do so.
0 Replies
 
JoanneDorel
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Mar, 2003 01:34 am
It is tradtional for Supreme Court Justices to not speak out publicly at televised events. The Supreme court has many traditions and I feel that is the probable reason. Not anything else.
0 Replies
 
Hazlitt
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Mar, 2003 10:39 pm
Social Engineering
maxsdadeo wrote:
No more social engineering. Wouldn't it be grand.


Hi Max, I think that both parties do social engineering. One party does so to benefit the rich and sometimes the middle class. The other party does so to benefit the middle class and the poor. Both parties claim to live by the Constitution.

"Social Engineering" is simply a pejorative phrase used by one party in an attempt to discredit the other.
0 Replies
 
 

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