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The sacraments

 
 
Reply Wed 18 May, 2005 09:32 am
Since there seemed to be some lack of knowledge about the sacraments in Christian churches (obviously even strong followers don't know exactly what it is in their own church), I'd like to give here some general information and specific links.

Quote:
The sacraments
source: Encyclopædia Britannica. 2005. Encyclopædia Britannica Premium Service, 18 May 2005, <http://www.britannica.com/eb/article?tocId=67512>.


Quote:
SacramentThe notion of sacrament is particularly important to the Orthodox Church and the Catholic Church, the latter which sees itself as a "sacramental agent." This means that sacraments are administered under its authority and care. Sacraments often mirror important life passages and should be seen as the spiritual and sacred reflection of their social/human counterparts. The Catholic and Orthodox Churches fix the number of sacraments at seven: Baptism, the rite of conversion into the church, sometimes in infancy; Confirmation, the renewal of one's belief as an adult along with the reaffirmation of a person's membership in the church; marriage or Holy Matrimony; Holy Orders or Ordination, when someone enters a permanent office of the church (e.g., as a deacon, priest, or bishop); the Sacrament of the Sick, or extreme unction, when one nears the end of life; Confession, or Reconciliation, where a person confesses their sins; and Mass--also known as Holy Communion, Holy Eucharist or the Lord's Supper--which symbolizes the formal forgiveness of confessed sins. Protestant Churches have different positions on the sacraments, from adoption of all or some of them to the denial of the idea of sacrament altogether (even when they practice some of the rites themselves).
source: Official Christianity Glossary for Introduction to Religion [University of Wyoming]


Catholic Church: The Seven Catholic Sacraments
(Same for the 22 Eastern churches in the Catholic communion.)

Anglican Church (Province of America): Our Lord instituted two sacraments as "generally necessary unto salvation": Baptism and the Eucharist

Anglican Church (The Church of England): Two sacraments ordained by Christ himself - Baptism and the Supper of the Lord

The understaning of sacraments may vary in various (Anglican) churches not in the Holy Communion

Protestant churches: the number and importance of sacraments variies in the many Protestant churches (e.g. Lutheran, Episcopalian, Baptist, Presbyterian Churches, the Seventh Day Adventists etc).

The Evangelical Church in Germany is the ecclesial communion of Lutheran, Reformed, and United Churches (Landeskirchen) and names the two sacraments.

Orthodox Church(es): Contemporary Orthodox catechisms and textbooks all affirm that the church recognizes seven mysteria, or "sacraments"

Sacraments: A Confirmation Scene

Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274): sacraments

Finally, from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: Sacraments, which gives some more references (and sources).
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 872 • Replies: 11
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Walter Hinteler
 
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Reply Wed 18 May, 2005 09:33 am
What's your experience with sacraments? How many do (does your church) celebrate? And what about the sacramentals, holy acts?
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neologist
 
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Reply Wed 18 May, 2005 10:06 am
I acknowledge the symbolic nature of baptism and the necessity of remembering the 'last passover'. Beyond that, the performance of rituals and sacraments is unscriptural.
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Walter Hinteler
 
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Reply Wed 18 May, 2005 10:15 am
neologist wrote:
Beyond that, the performance of rituals and sacraments is unscriptural.


Well, exactly that describes the differences: the various interpretations of what is scriptural, what not, why that is a(n addtional) sacrament or not ...
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Steve 41oo
 
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Reply Wed 18 May, 2005 10:36 am
Not thinking of taking holy orders are you Walter?
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Marquis de Carabas
 
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Reply Wed 18 May, 2005 11:00 am
Walter Hinteler wrote:
What's your experience with sacraments?


I've seen the prayer of the Eucharist being performed. I also once convinced a mormon priest to bless a glass of water for me out of curiosity. That's it. Oh yeah and I went to a fairly traditional pagan samhain sacrament once (and participated to be polite). That's really it.

Quote:
How many do you (does your church) celebrate?


I don't have a church, thus none. My family is episcopalian (well, that's their roots anyway) but I know nothing of their sacrements.

Quote:
And what about the sacramentals, holy acts?


No experience.
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LionTamerX
 
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Reply Fri 27 May, 2005 08:51 pm
I'm wondering about this very thing tonight. I am not a religious person, but my dad who was, passed away this morning. I'm wondering if Extreme Unction is necessary in the Catholic rulebook.
I just don't have it in me to do the research tonight.

I guess I should have paid attention to my catechism as a lad.
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Walter Hinteler
 
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Reply Fri 27 May, 2005 10:46 pm
My condolences, LionTamerX.
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LionTamerX
 
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Reply Sat 28 May, 2005 01:32 pm
Walter Hinteler wrote:
My condolences, LionTamerX.


Thank you sir.
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Intrepid
 
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Reply Sat 28 May, 2005 02:02 pm
I just noticed this thread. I do not have the answer, but I just wanted to add my profound condolences, Lion TamerX. May you find strength and comfort in your time of sorrow.
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Merry Andrew
 
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Reply Sat 28 May, 2005 02:25 pm
Please allow me to add my condolences, LionTamerX. As for your question, I believe -- but I only believe -- that the sacrament of Extreme Unction is required only if an ordained priest is readily available. Absent such availability, there should be no bar to the assumption that your dad passed on shriven of his sins. I believe the general consensus is that the disposition of the departed's soul depends on his/her state of mind at the time of demise, a condition which only God can know.
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LionTamerX
 
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Reply Sat 28 May, 2005 02:34 pm
Intrepid and MA,
thank you for your kind words. I went to the Catholic encyclopedia and it says basically what MA stated.

I trust that dad's sinning days were long since past, and he moves on with a clean slate.
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