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Indigenous leaders back Kerri-Anne Kennerley in racism row

 
 
vikorr
 
Reply Tue 29 Jan, 2019 09:52 pm
https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/jan/28/yumi-stynes-calls-kerri-anne-kennerley-racist-in-on-air-clash-over-australia-day

Video embedded in above link.

Quote:
The Studio 10 co-host Kerri-Anne Kennerley has been accused of racism by fellow panellist Yumi Stynes after the veteran presenter talked about sexual violence in Indigenous communities during a discussion about Invasion Day protests.

Kennerley attacked the motives of the protesters who want the date of Australia Day changed by implying they were ignoring the alleged rape of children and women in the “outback”.


https://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/indigenous/indigenous-leaders-back-kerrianne-kennerley-in-racism-row/news-story/286d9342510b680a5f0dbc75d13e5bc7

Quote:
Indigenous leaders back Kerri-Anne Kennerley in racism row

Indigenous leaders have weighed in to support TV veteran Kerri-Anne Kennerley after she was ­accused of being a “racist” during an on-air spat over an “Invasion Day” debate.

“We have reached a point of political correctness in this country where people cannot talk about difficult issues for fear of being ­accused of racism,” Health Minister Ken Wyatt told The Australian last night.

A panellist on the Ten Network’s Studio 10 morning show, Yumi Stynes, labelled Kennerley “racist” after she asked why ­Australia Day protesters weren’t doing more for indigenous communities in the outback.

“Babies and five-year-olds are being raped … their mothers are being raped, their sisters are being raped.

“What have you done? Zippo,” Kennerley said on Monday...

Mr Wyatt last night defended Kennerley’s comments, saying that while her delivery may have been “clunky”, she was right in saying that not enough was being done for ­Aboriginal women and children in remote communities....

Warren Mundine praised Kennerley for opening up a much-needed discussion about social problems in remote Aboriginal communities, saying it was “stupid” to label her a racist for doing so.

“I know exactly where Kennerley was coming from and many indigenous people are in the same boat,” Mr Mundine told The Daily Telegraph.

“We are sick and tired of all this whingeing when we want to confront the real issues that are being dealt with in communities.”...

Alice Springs indigenous councillor Jacinta Price applauded Kennerley for “telling the truth”.

“The really dangerous racism is turning a blind eye to the facts of the matter, so that Aboriginal women, children, yes and even men, continue to suffer horrific lives,” Ms Price says....


Warren Mundine is one of the most common sense people I know, when it comes to difficult discussions surrounding aboriginal issues. I think 'clunky' was a really good way to describe what Kerri-Ann Kennerley was trying to say - but clunky would be understated. Also, I actually don't agree that it's pointless protesting one day per year, but I don't see her comments as coming from a racist viewpoint at all - a view that is essentially 'if you truly care about the plight of aboriginal peoples, you should be doing more than being a protestor for just one day a year' is hardly racist.

Posted because it has been my contention for a while that the difficult discussions get shut down by inappropriate shouts of racism, resulting in true discussion not being had.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 924 • Replies: 12
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ascribbler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Jan, 2019 11:55 pm
@vikorr,
Join the dots for indigene artifice, righto.


Kerrianne Kennel:

Quote:
“Has any single one of those 5,000 people waving the flags saying how inappropriate the day is, has any one of them been out to the outback where children, where babies and five-year-olds are being raped, their mothers are being raped, their sisters are being raped. They get no education,” Kennerley said on the Ten morning show.
vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2019 07:16 am
@ascribbler,
Quote:
Join the dots for indigene artifice, righto
I can't even make sense of this.
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2019 11:06 am
This is actually a much more interesting, and difficult problem.

It is a fact that White people came to wipe out long standing cultural practices of indigenous Australians. It is a fact that child marriage was one of these cultural practices. Before White people came, the indigenous Australians had child marriage. Whatever we think of the practice now, back then it was a normal part of existing cultures.

The narrative of white people protecting indigenous women from their own culture (and from indigenous men) makes me uncomfortable.
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2019 11:24 am
@vikorr,
I think the headline to this thread is misleading. And, it is interesting that this discussion seems to be mostly White people arguing with each other over how to fix indigenous culture. At the core of this issue... the problem is Colonialism.

The "Indigenous" leader (and only one was quoted as far as I can see) didn't say he agreed with Ms. Kennereley. To say that he is "backing" her is an exaggeration.

He only said that she had a right to her opinion without being called a racist and that his community had much more important things to worry about.
vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2019 04:05 pm
@maxdancona,
Unfortunately, my local paper likes to sensationalise things. It has a long history of putting emotive slants on things, as well as leaving important facts out in order to put that emotive slant on things. That said, as far as I can tell, it's never actually reported something that was blatantly untrue. All that is to say - your note regarding the use of the word 'backing' is accurate.

The Alice Springs counsellor was aboriginal also. Not sure about the third person.

Quote:
The narrative of white people protecting indigenous women from their own culture (and from indigenous men) makes me uncomfortable.
I think one has to be very careful to differentiate culture from crime. I don't see anyone making reference to protection from their culture - every word used related to a crime.

https://aifs.gov.au/publications/family-violence-and-sexual-assault-indigenous-communities/incidence-and-responses-violence-indigenous-communities
Quote:
Incidence and responses to violence in Indigenous communities
"The Women's Task Force report paints a frightening picture of violence that is increasing not only in numbers but also in severity (2000: xxiii). The Task Force was formed when the degree of suffering in many Indigenous communities had reached a crisis point." (2000: ix)

Any discussion of sexual assault in this context must start by examining the wider issue of violence that occurs in Aboriginal communities. The statistics are nothing short of staggering. Blagg (2000) reports that Indigenous people are 4.6 times more likely to be the victims of violent crime than non-Indigenous people. Indigenous women are particularly at risk of violence, being 12 times more likely to be the victims of assault than non-Indigenous women.
That would be covering both city/town aboriginals and reservation dwelling aborginals. The remote reservations tend to have the more severe problems by far (people want them to be called communities, but the in this discussion, the word community is too strongly associated with communities in cities and towns - leading to it's use misleading an uninformed persons understanding of the situation)

I'm not sure where you are going with the 'white interference' line of thought. Do you think all white government services to such places stop? That they should just give money to an aboriginal council and let them sort it out? This last has been tried by the way. That they give reservations more self determination? Also been tried.

maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2019 04:13 pm
@vikorr,
Australia's realtionship to its indigenous population is seriously fucked up (and I am definitely not implying that ours isn't). The blame belongs with colonialism, and the colonial attitudes persist. The damage is being done. There are no easy answers.

Putting the blame on indigenous men and women rather than acknowledging the continuing destructive effects of colonialism is ugly.

vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2019 04:18 pm
@maxdancona,
Who exactly is 'putting the blame on indigenous men and women?'

Is talking about a crime problem, a problem? Should it not be talked about? If it can't be talked about, how can a conversation start about how to reduce the crime victimisation rate (because that it was the original conversation started with)?
vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2019 04:33 pm
Seems to be creating some debate in the press:

Quote:
An open letter to ‘racist’ Kerri-Anne Kennerley

Dear Kerri-Anne Kennerley,

I must say, I have always enjoyed seeing your warm face on TV but your Studio 10 segment yesterday confirmed something I was unaware of — Yumi Stynes called it — you sound like a racist.

So just in case you ever read this, let’s start by debunking your word vomit.

SEXUAL ASSAULT AND VIOLENCE

Weighing in on the weekend’s “Invasion Day” protests, you asked whether any of the protesters had “been out to the Outback, where children, babies, five-year-olds are being raped? Their mothers are being raped, their sisters are being raped. What have you done?” — and were shocked when it was pointed our what you were saying sounded “quite racist”.

I in no way am de-legitimising sexual assault and violence in Aboriginal communities. Of course it occurs in indigenous communities as it does in the wider community.

However, when it comes to indigenous people, I can’t get past the fact that people like you perceive violence as something ingrained in Aboriginal culture.

Violence is a part of Australian culture. To prescribe it as a characteristic of one race is narrow-minded and rooted in the racist ideology that labelled Aboriginal people “savages”.

After all in Australia, one woman a week and one man a month are murdered by current or former partners...

“In 2014–15, indigenous women were 32 times as likely to be hospitalised due to family violence as non-indigenous women, while indigenous men were 23 times as likely to be hospitalised as non-indigenous men,” the report said.

“In 2015–16, indigenous children were seven times as likely to be the subject of substantiated child abuse or neglect as non-indigenous children.”

I agree, these statistics are grim, however society holds this assumption that all violence upon indigenous people is perpetrated by other indigenous people.

The fact is, 74 per cent of married indigenous people are married to a non-indigenous person. Don’t you think holding the assumption that indigenous women only have indigenous partners is more than a little ludicrous and probably racist?...


In relation to the last part - Kerri-Anne specifically mentioned outback aborigines, and most likely actually meant remote reservation aboriginals (which is what makes the news the most), where aboriginal - aboriginal marriage rates are likely to be close to 100%.

An inaccurate observation doesn't delegitimise her concerns (I disagree that they are racist, but that is what it is, a disagreement), but rather than look at the essence of what was trying to be achieved, she's essentially poured all her energy into sidetracking those issues, to focus on the phrasing. It would have been more helpful to go 'I can use your comments to steer the press coverage in a positive way, to help and better my peoples lives'
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2019 04:38 pm
@vikorr,
You can't separate crime from the bigger questions of culture and the effects of colonization. The way that crime is defined and addressed is entwined with culture.

Before Australia was colonized, child marriage was not only legal... it was part of the culture. After Australia was colonized it was made illegal. This is a drastic change to the culture, it impacts familial relationships and ideas of gender and identity. This is just one example of how Colonization forced European cultural ideas on aboriginal cultures.

Colonization is now a reality, now we are dealing with the aftereffects. There are no easy answer... European culture has prevailed along with its views of crime and social norms around marriage.

I am not suggesting an answer... other than it should be acknowledge that this is an ugly mess that is not the fault of these aboriginal communities. I do think that these communities are owed a lot more in terms of respect and the right to determine their own way forward.

The solution implied by these news reports is to continue forcing White Australian views of crime and law enforcement on these communities is deeply troubling.

I strongly doubt that this violence was prevalent before Australia was colonized.
vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2019 04:53 pm
@maxdancona,
Quote:
You can't separate crime from the bigger questions of culture and the effects of colonization
Who has made this claim? Crime must be able to be spoken of when it is out of proportion to the community. And so does the contributing factors. Is the recognition of the bigger problems not implicit in what I previously wrote?

Quote:
The way that crime is defined...is entwined with culture.
To some degree. The more serious ones, which were the only ones spoken of, cross cultural boundaries. Addressing serious crime is much more closely entwined with culture.

Quote:
This is just one example of how Colonization forced European cultural ideas on aboriginal cultures.
Recognition of this is necessary. It is also impossible to reverse the state of being an advanced nation, or to change the past. The only possible way then, is the way forward. The question that needs to be answered, is 'how do we move forward in a way that has positive affects?'

Quote:
I am not suggesting an answer

I had a previous conversation with a poster who didn't like any suggestion I had to improve lives, and only offered criticism without any suggestions of his own. That doesn't sit well with me. I think this needs open discussion at all levels of government...but they are too frightened to have public discussion for fear of being called racist. This to my way of thinking, can only prolong the existing level of problems.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2019 05:10 pm
@vikorr,
Quote:
Quote:
This is just one example of how Colonization forced European cultural ideas on aboriginal cultures.

Recognition of this is necessary. It is also impossible to reverse. The only possible way then, is the way forward. The question that needs to be answered, is 'how do we move forward in a way that has positive affects?'


I don't think there is any way forward that has "positive" effects. This is a process of replacing aboriginal cultures with European cultural beliefs. The aboriginal cultures have already been disrupted, so now the process must be completed I guess.

I wouldn't call this "positive" in any sense of the word.

I do find it troubling that all of the news accounts of this are White people telling us what "an aboriginal leader" says. I don't see the voices of actual aboriginal people being represented.

The best way forward would be to let aboriginal communities speak for themselves even when they are defying White cultural values.
vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jan, 2019 05:29 pm
@maxdancona,
Quote:
I don't think there is any way forward that has "positive" effects
Um. Seriously?

Quote:
This is a process of replacing aboriginal cultures with European cultural beliefs. The aboriginal cultures have already been disrupted, so now the process must be completed I guess.
That to me, is part right, and part wrong.

Plenty of ethnic communities within Australia maintain their own cultures, so I don't see your 'complete the cultural destruction' as a legitimate statement.

To rise above the poverty line (as opposed to obtaining self esteem, a sense of purpose etc) - the only way within this country, is through the education / work / entrepreneurial process. Opportunity for this is in very short supply within remote reservations. So rising above the poverty line essentially means leaving the reservations, which is difficult to do.

Government, and private schools offer scholarships to indigenous students, and the private schools try to keep their cultures alive for them (my nephew went to one)

Quote:
I do find it troubling that all of the news accounts of this are White people telling us what "an aboriginal leader" says. I don't see the voices of actual aboriginal people being represented.
Umm...as all the news outlets are run by white people, the reporting of an aboriginal elders views through that medium should not be troubling - it is the only way it can happen. Elders are respected members of their community (and I mean respected by the aboriginal community). Rather than cut & paste, I think it would be helpful for you to look the term up. It has specific meanings.

Quote:
The best way forward would be to let aboriginal communities speak for themselves even when they are defying White cultural values
Did I not previously mention that this has been tried? The federal government used to fund an ATSIC board. The reservations are run by aboriginal councils, who have the ability to create by-laws, and have their own community police. City dwelling aboriginals have elders who deal with the institutions within the city.
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