0
   

Pope refuses hospital - is this not suicide?

 
 
Eorl
 
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2005 03:04 am
Pope refuses hospital - is this not suicide?
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 891 • Replies: 15
No top replies

 
Mr Stillwater
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2005 03:12 am
He's got a feeding tube and stuff.

Besides, he's the POPE - who else is going to say what constitutes moral/immoral behaviour for members of his faith?
0 Replies
 
material girl
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2005 05:06 am
Regardless of religion I think its dam right rude if someone says that another person cant take their own life.
Its their life, if they want to go , let them.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2005 11:30 am
I think you're right, Material Girl.

It's his choice how to spend what could be the final hours and days of his life.
0 Replies
 
Bella Dea
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2005 11:35 am
Kind of ironic now isn't it?
0 Replies
 
Bi-Polar Bear
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2005 11:38 am
Let's impeach him and the papal court.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2005 11:39 am
Edited-Moronic Content
0 Replies
 
Intrepid
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2005 11:47 am
Re: Pope refuses hospital - is this not suicide?
Eorl wrote:
Pope refuses hospital - is this not suicide?


Stretching a fine line I would say. Suicide would be to take a healthy body and purposely destroy it. If the Pope is refusing the hospital he is refusing treatment that would only extend the inevitable. Of course, it is inevitable that we will all die some day, but there IS a difference between natural causes and suicide.

I am not Catholic, but since the Pope is the supreme human authority within their Church, he is responsible for their moral, ethical and spiritual following.
0 Replies
 
goodfielder
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Apr, 2005 11:42 pm
Suicide is a secular concept anyway - many jurisdictions have criminal prohibitions on assisting people to commit suicide. Some used to make it an offence for someone to commit suicide (not many convictions though) and to attempt suicide (some convictions). Its origins lie not so much in canon law but in secular law.

The issue of sustaining or not sustaining life within the teachings of the Catholic Church would be far more complex than secular issues of suicide, or so I would imagine, having no knowledge at all of it.
0 Replies
 
JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Apr, 2005 07:38 pm
Suicide has to do with intention, does it not? If the pope believes that no hospital treatment can put off or prevent his death then it is not suicide. This pope has been a reactionary force, not good for the rights of women, gays, the population crisis, etc., but I admire his fortitude and his absolute committment to his role. He has never sought to avoid severe discomfort by putting off his obligations. He was a martyr to his office.
0 Replies
 
Eva
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Apr, 2005 09:55 pm
I don't think he hastened his own death by refusing hospitalization. They could bring all the same medical personnel and equipment to him in his quarters...and did. I think that he somehow knew he wasn't going to make it this time (many have similar insight near the end...it's uncanny...I've seen it many times), and he made a decision about where he wanted to die. Like many others, he preferred to die at home. I find nothing questionable about it.
0 Replies
 
Eorl
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Apr, 2005 08:52 pm
The point is, shouldn't every possible thing have been done to ensure he lives as long as possible, whether he is ready or not? This is what the church expects of everybody else, this was made plain in their position on Terri Schiavo.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Apr, 2005 09:04 pm
sHIAVO CASE WAS two distinct and opposing medical opinions with 2 opposing outcomes. The champion of each side was not the principal party. The pope recognized that his chances by either spiritual means, or a combination of spiritual/ medical interventions was ultimately his choice alone.Each had a basis in belief.

By your definition an early medical intervention would include no smoking or driving as conscious activities because there are chances that suspension of each activity will prolong your life and you would therefore not be guilty of taking your life in an act of "suicide"

The CHURCH didnt take a side on the Shiavo case, individual clergy did. They only spoke for themselves.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Apr, 2005 09:08 pm
Material girl said it just right.
0 Replies
 
Eorl
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Apr, 2005 09:53 pm
Thanks Farmerman, straight to the heart of the matter as always. Although I did think the church had an official position on Terri...I'm pleased to be wrong about that.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Apr, 2005 10:05 pm
Papal infallibility must be announced up front, and its based solely onfaith and morals. Ive not heard the "I" word used in the Shiavo case. However I did hear dueling neurologists, left v right wing pundits, and several clergy glomming face time on tv. I dont think that the Shiavo case showed a "finest moment" for anyone. It did , however, reinforce the facts that a living will is just a piece of paper that some attorney can twist and destroy if you dont have an agent guarding your wishes.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

700 Inconsistencies in the Bible - Discussion by onevoice
Why do we deliberately fool ourselves? - Discussion by coincidence
Spirituality - Question by Miller
Oneness vs. Trinity - Discussion by Arella Mae
give you chills - Discussion by Bartikus
Evidence for Evolution! - Discussion by Bartikus
Evidence of God! - Discussion by Bartikus
One World Order?! - Discussion by Bartikus
God loves us all....!? - Discussion by Bartikus
The Preambles to Our States - Discussion by Charli
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Pope refuses hospital - is this not suicide?
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.04 seconds on 03/06/2021 at 09:14:23