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Putting together an Anglophile’s three week vacation

 
 
Lash
 
Reply Sat 26 May, 2018 06:47 pm
http://www.classic-england.com/england-tours/british-authors-tour

Just beginning to research a ideas to hone into a smart, efficient, heart-squeezing jaunt through the UK.

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Type: Question • Score: 5 • Views: 5,028 • Replies: 100

 
oralloy
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 27 May, 2018 04:35 am
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castles_and_Town_Walls_of_King_Edward_in_Gwynedd

Personally, Caernarfon Castle seems more a palace than a fortress to me, but I think that Harlech Castle, Conwy Castle, and Beaumaris Castle are outstanding examples of pre-gunpowder fortifications.
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 May, 2018 06:16 am
@oralloy,
Thanks. I’m pretty sure the primary points will be Kent, Edinburgh, Dublin, and London. I don’t want to be racing about, but I have deeply-held desires to spend time at several places.

A branch of my family was in possession of a castle in Surrey, so hoping at least part of it is still there. A Manor House was also owned by that branch in Kent, and I really want to stay in that area for a while. Walk where they walked.

I think I have to add a Wales destination, homage to a Lawrence novel, Richard Burton, and Dylan Thomas.

Looks like an extended visit.

Have you vacationed in Great Britain?



0 Replies
 
Agent1741
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 May, 2018 07:43 am
Lived there for many years so if you have questions please feel free. I would do a tour around London on a tourbus that way you do not have to worry about driving/parking. Unless its a place you really want to see forget Stonehenge its a fair way out of London & its just a pile of old rocks. Oxford is real nice, Brighton on the south coast (has a pier with amusements & have fish & chips there), it also has a Palace. You could catch the train through to Paris for the day whilst in London. The "tube" (underground) is a relatively quick, cheap way to get around but can be crowded. Gas is expensive there & I would not recommend driving in London traffic & lots of one way streets not to mention parking is not the best!
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 May, 2018 08:45 am
@Agent1741,
I may forego London to lay in the middle of the ‘henge for a while. Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

I think I’m going to compile a pipe dream list and research and whittle down to what’s possible.

I’ll entertain all ideas shared here.

I’ve never ever been a tour guide girl, but I hear your info about parking difficulties. San Francisco is similar—and parking issues do make CalTrain and hopping cable cars the best way to see the city.

Starting a planner and your opinion goes in.

Thanks.

Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sun 27 May, 2018 09:47 am
@Lash,
You should make - as you already did - priorities.
Then, look how to combine them, not only regarding how to get from one point to the other, but what you want to look at and/or discover how long and how intensively. [I've been with the missus for four weeks in South/Southwest ... and we couldn't see all the places I wanted to show her.]

What I really do suggest is that you perhaps choose b&b's as accommodation: it's more individual, cheaper and you get contact = tips from the locals.

Since you mentioned Hardy elsewhere: what about a trip to Hardy county? Include Corfe Castle, Salisbury, Stonehenge, Glastonbury, Exeter, the Jurassic coast ...?
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 May, 2018 10:03 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Brilliant idea.

I’ve heard that a lot of people in Britain let rooms for this purpose, and this method of getting into the culture is definitely my preference. I have two incredible real estate shows on Netflix, focusing on the culture and history of English counties that I’ll start reviewing. I’m sure to find so many more resources.

This will be a long process for me. A teacher’s salary, saving for a pretty expensive holiday, will likely put me on a plane next summer, but truthfully, the research and planning will be a notably agreeable part of the experience.

I welcome any and all ideas or experiences from you.

Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sun 27 May, 2018 10:26 am
@Lash,
Regarding the b&b's: TripAdvisor (or any other website) may give some hints. But not more. (I've stayed in some places, which just got a medium review, but were excellent in my opinion.)

Perhaps you stay somewhere in the countryside or at the seaside for a couple of days and start tours (either with public transport or a rented car) from there?

Another question is: do you want to go to the US-tourist-must-have-seen-this places or really want to focus on the culture and history of English counties?
East Anglia with Norwich, theConstable Country, the Broads and the North Norfolk coast are nice, too ... and include Bury St Edmunds, Cambridge and (my personal favourite) Ely.

And since you want to go Ireland (Dublin) as well: stay before or afterwards in Manchester/Liverpool.
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 May, 2018 10:33 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Laughing that I tried to peck you two thumbs up for that. Many thanks. I was considering landing in Heathrow and making a long circular journey around to my points of interest, definitely pausing at a few seaside/ family interest locations.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sun 27 May, 2018 10:56 am
@Lash,
Edinburgh, certainly a must ... go to Linlithgow, too, just a short drive away. And Dunfermline.


Parking difficulties: in many cities (and towns) you'll find "park and ride" options: you pay (example Cambridge) £1 to park for up to 18 hours and then purchase a £3 bus ticket that is valid to and from the city, but you can
use this ticket to get on and off any park&ride bus all day.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  3  
Reply Sun 27 May, 2018 04:35 pm
@Lash,
Lash wrote:

I may forego London to lay in the middle of the ‘henge for a while.


You can forget about that. People haven't been allowed to climb on the stones for a long time. Now you drive to a car park and pay to get on a shuttle to show you around the stones. You can see them from the road, but if you want to get close it costs.

When my son's Brazilian girlfriend came to stay we did Henge followed by Cheddar Gorge/Caves and Glastonbury on her first day, did a round trip, went via Salisbury came back via the New Forest.

Lot to fit in though, after seeing the caves there wasn't much time for Glastonbury.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 May, 2018 04:52 pm
@Lash,
Travelodge are fairly cheap, there's a few discount chains but that's the only one I can think of right now.

As a rule of thumb the North is cheaper than the South.
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 May, 2018 04:52 pm
@izzythepush,
What is the penalty for an impromptu late night henge visit? I wouldn’t crawl on but would really love to step inside the circle and stay for a while.

International incident or mild fine?

Heartbreaking that it’s not allowed.
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 May, 2018 04:54 pm
@izzythepush,
I’m thinking b&b, staying with folks in their homes. My daughter’s game, and I’ve thought this is the best way to experience where I am.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 May, 2018 04:58 pm
@Lash,
I'd check out the reviews because they can vary a lot. Also prices during season are more expensive. Our school holidays run from the last week or so in July through to the end of August, so that's peak time. May, June, early July or September would be cheaper.
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 May, 2018 05:06 pm
@izzythepush,
Yes. Invaluable advice. I did want to avoid the bone-chilling cold, but I have to find a slice of time to avoid the $$ season, too.

I’m already having to tamp down giddy exhilaration.
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Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 May, 2018 05:15 pm
I may be able to stay on the right side of the law.

https://www.londontoolkit.com/whattodo/stonehenge_special_access.htm


Stonehenge Special Access Tour inside the stones
When you visit Stonehenge during public hours you have to keep behind a small rope fence about two foot off the ground. For most people this is perfectly adequate and has the advantage that no people get into your photographs.

For those who are really, really interested in Stonehenge it is possible to go beyond the rope fence and walk among the stones.

Edit: I envision more dinero...
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Sun 27 May, 2018 05:26 pm
@Lash,
They tend to be at specific times of year, during the solstices the druids get in there and do their thing OK.

I don't know about anyone else touching them though, it's that which has caused most of the damage. They were virtually ignored until the beginning of the 20th century, the surrounding area is all agricultural. They weren't like they are now, lots had fallen and they were raised and set in concrete, there's some debate over whether or not that was a good thing.
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 May, 2018 05:28 pm
@izzythepush,
Perhaps Kate and I can appeal to the druids... Sad that the stones have been changed.
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izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 May, 2018 05:29 pm
@Lash,
Cheddar Gorge, (where the cheese comes from.) It's not at all far from Henge.

https://secure.i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01373/Cheddar-Gorge_1373977c.jpg
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