72
   

Global Warming...New Report...and it ain't happy news

 
 
oralloy
 
  -2  
Reply Fri 16 Jul, 2021 05:15 pm
@hightor,
hightor wrote:
I'm more concerned that you take global warming and climate change seriously.

Not as long as the left is against nuclear power.
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  -2  
Reply Fri 16 Jul, 2021 05:17 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:
Something wrong with your ears? Alliance 90/The Greens is an opposition party, 67 out of 709 seats in the federal parliament.

I don't think it's my ears. I think it's that no one has bothered to mention it.

So if the Greens are out of power now, then what is the current status of Germany's nuclear power industry?
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 16 Jul, 2021 09:55 pm
@oralloy,
Quote:
When the [conservative] CDU/CSU won the elections in 2009 and formed a coalition with the [liberal party] Free Democrats (FDP), they extended the operating time by eight years for seven nuclear plants and 14 years for the remaining ten. This became known as the “phase-out of the (nuclear) phase-out” (Ausstieg aus dem Ausstieg). However, in the wake of the nuclear catastrophe in Fukushima, Japan, the Merkel government decided in June 2011 to shut down eight nuclear plants and limit the operation of the remaining nine to 2022. Over 80 percent of parliamentarians voted for the bill in the Bundestag (federal parliament). Die Linke (Left Party) only objected because it wanted a faster exit and the measure’s inclusion in the constitution. Polls in the following years always showed a majority of the population to be in favour of phasing out nuclear power in the country.
(Source)
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 16 Jul, 2021 10:29 pm
Prospectors for new oil and gas reserves in Greenland can forget it: The arctic island government plans to stop issuing new licenses, saying it takes the "climate crisis seriously."

Greenland suspends oil exploration because of climate change
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 16 Jul, 2021 10:32 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Thanks for the update. What fossil fuels are Germany going to use in place of nuclear power?
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 16 Jul, 2021 10:37 pm
@oralloy,
oralloy wrote:
What fossil fuels are Germany going to use in place of nuclear power?
None.
oralloy
 
  -2  
Reply Fri 16 Jul, 2021 10:40 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
How are you going to fill in the shortfalls when renewables can't produce enough power to meet your demand?

Are going to have socialist-style rolling blackouts?
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 16 Jul, 2021 10:45 pm
@oralloy,
At least in the moment, we mainly rely on the Synchronous grid of Continental Europe.

Even my local power provider get's the electricity daily from different sources via the European Power Exchange
oralloy
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 16 Jul, 2021 11:35 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
So you're just going to let France build all the nuclear reactors and then buy from them.

I suppose that makes sense. They are good at nuclear power.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 16 Jul, 2021 11:50 pm
@oralloy,
Germany's electricity exchange balance in 2020 was around -21 terawatt hours. This means that Germany exported around 21 terawatt hours more than it imported in 2020. The last time Germany imported more than it exported was in 2002.
Cross-border trade is especially strong with France.


https://i.imgur.com/NUDwNQN.jpg
oralloy
 
  -2  
Reply Sat 17 Jul, 2021 06:56 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Do you think the situation will remain the same once Germany gives up nuclear power without replacing it with fossil fuel?

What do you think the situation will be during periods when the wind isn't blowing and the sun isn't shining?
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Sat 17 Jul, 2021 08:02 am
@oralloy,
We got 12.5% of our power from nuclear power stations.
I think we'll get even more energy from biomass as already today.
Besides that, already today energy is transported from onshore and offshore (German) windparks from one part of the country to the other if needed.

Nearly real time data >here<

By the way, additional nuclear power from France will probably not flow to Germany: simulations and experience show that at times when Germany would have to import electricity (especially in winter), France also has to import from its neighbouring countries, because the country's electricity demand is extremely high in winter due to the widespread use of electric heating.
oralloy
 
  -2  
Reply Sat 17 Jul, 2021 11:39 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:
By the way, additional nuclear power from France will probably not flow to Germany: simulations and experience show that at times when Germany would have to import electricity (especially in winter), France also has to import from its neighbouring countries, because the country's electricity demand is extremely high in winter due to the widespread use of electric heating.

That sounds like a disaster in the making. How are those other countries going to produce power for you guys?
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sat 17 Jul, 2021 12:00 pm
@oralloy,
oralloy wrote:
That sounds like a disaster in the making. How are those other countries going to produce power for you guys?
Might be so from your point of view and from the status of power supply you've got where you live.

The last blackout I remember was more than 60 years ago, lasted long two hours then.
But these days, unfortunately hundreds of thousands in my state are still without electricity due to the floodings.

Electric power in Europe is exchanged every day between countries. The "how" is explained in the links I gave above or linked on those websides.
oralloy
 
  -2  
Reply Sat 17 Jul, 2021 12:09 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Electricity has to be produced before it can be exchanged.

Who are you hoping will have enough surplus electricity to see France and Germany through future winters?
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sat 17 Jul, 2021 12:13 pm
@oralloy,
oralloy wrote:
Who are you hoping will have enough surplus electricity to see France and Germany through future winters?
Since both Germany and France are still are big exporters of electricity, Europe will be dark in future winters. (See table above.)
oralloy
 
  -2  
Reply Sat 17 Jul, 2021 01:50 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
That sounds ominous.
glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Mon 19 Jul, 2021 10:40 pm
@oralloy,
Really?? I think their future is brighter than Texas right now.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Wed 21 Jul, 2021 11:30 pm
Diana Six, an entomologist studying beetles near Glacier national park in Montana, says the crisis has fundamentally changed her profession.

Top US scientist on melting glaciers: ‘I’ve gone from being an ecologist to a coroner’
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Thu 22 Jul, 2021 11:14 pm
“Weather, climate and water-related hazards are increasing in frequency and intensity as a result of climate change,” said WMO Secretary-General Petteri Taalas.

“The human and economic toll was highlighted with tragic effect by the torrential rainfall and devastating flooding and loss of life in central Europe and China in the past week,” he added.

Also noting that the recent record-breaking heatwaves in North America are “clearly linked” to global warming, Taalas cited a recent rapid attribution analysis that climate change, caused by greenhouse gas emissions, made the heatwave at least 150 times more likely to happen.

The German national meteorological service said up to two months’ worth of rainfall fell in 2 days, on 14 and 15 July, affecting parts of Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, Switzerland and Austria.

According to news reports, more than 170 people have died in Germany alone, and more than 150 remain missing.

Water-related hazards dominate list of 10 most destructive disasters
 

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