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Do abbreviated words (like can't, won't, etc.) count as 1 or 2 words?

 
 
Reply Wed 4 Oct, 2017 12:30 pm
Hey guys!

I have to continue a story. And it will be marked. We should count the words in the end. But do words like can't and don't count as 1 or 2 words?

Thanks
 
Region Philbis
 
  3  
Reply Wed 4 Oct, 2017 12:37 pm
@CrazyMausi2000,

per Cambridge English: Proficiency (CPE) --

Quote:
Contracted words count as the number of words they would be if they were not contracted.

For example, isn't, didn't, I'm, I'll are counted as two words (replacing is not, did not, I am, I will).

Where the contraction replaces one word (e.g. can't for cannot), it is counted as one word.
centrox
 
  3  
Reply Wed 4 Oct, 2017 12:47 pm
As Region says, it is common to count a contraction according to what it replaces. Under that scheme can't is one word because it replaces cannot, while won't, don't, wouldn't, would count as two words because they replace will not, do not, would not, respectively. Word processor word-count software is not usually clever enough to embody this, I think*. If you would be penalised for too many (or too few) words, it might be as well to find out from your teacher what word count value is given to contractions.

* My Microsoft Word 2003 thinks that "I won't sing because I can't." is six words.
cameronleon
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 5 Oct, 2017 07:40 pm
@centrox,
Quote:
* My Microsoft Word 2003 thinks that "I won't sing because I can't." is six words.


Because "won't" replaces "wonnot"... I think...
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  3  
Reply Thu 5 Oct, 2017 07:44 pm
Jeeze . . . there is no word "wonnot" in English. When I was in university, we used a simple rule of thumb, which was that five spaces--characters, apostrophes, spaces between words--made a "word" for purposes of counting the number of words. That's not a hard and fast rule, it's just a useful way of determining how many words are in one's essay.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Oct, 2017 08:10 pm
@Setanta,
Not sure, but I think that applies for writers who get paid by the word.
Setanta
 
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Reply Thu 5 Oct, 2017 08:23 pm
@roger,
Could be--it would certainly have been easy in the old days when typesetters could count up the words pretty quickly.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Oct, 2017 06:17 am
@Region Philbis,
Region Philbis wrote:


per Cambridge English: Proficiency (CPE) --

Quote:
Contracted words count as the number of words they would be if they were not contracted.

For example, isn't, didn't, I'm, I'll are counted as two words (replacing is not, did not, I am, I will).

Where the contraction replaces one word (e.g. can't for cannot), it is counted as one word.


Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad
When it comes to a2k word games? Contracted words will ALWAYS BE COUNTED AS ONE WORD! I will defend that to my last dying breath!
Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Fri 6 Oct, 2017 06:20 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

Jeeze . . . there is no word "wonnot" in English.

But there is such a word, cannot. Just saying to muddle the whole scene.
0 Replies
 
CrazyMausi2000
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Oct, 2017 09:29 pm
@Region Philbis,
Thanks :-)
Yea. Contracted words and not abbreviated words. πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚
I've never heard of this term before. πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚
0 Replies
 
CrazyMausi2000
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Oct, 2017 09:37 pm
@centrox,
I usually don't write essays via computer. Tbh, I haven't got a printer.
It would be marvellous if computer could count words in handwritten essays.😁😁; Thanks!
centrox
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Oct, 2017 12:57 am
@CrazyMausi2000,
CrazyMausi2000 wrote:

It would be marvellous if computer could count words in handwritten essays.

When I was at school in the 1960s, when we had to write a prΓ©cis, where word count was important, we were taught to use a pencil and straight edge to make vertical lines on ruled paper thus creating a grid, and then write one word in each rectangle. This made counting easier, and also it made you think about each word.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Oct, 2017 02:30 am
@Setanta,
Maybe he means wingnut, he must have heard that a lot.

If nothing else is demonstrates the very poor educational attainments of Holocaust denying, neo Nazi religious fruitcakes.
0 Replies
 
 

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