19
   

Gone With The Wind is, well, it's GONE!

 
 
ehBeth
 
  4  
Reply Mon 28 Aug, 2017 02:55 pm
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:
It's a 78 year old, 4 hour long passe film with an ever shrinking audience


people loved it

some people still love it

https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/gone_with_the_wind/

Quote:
All Critics | Top Critics
TOMATOMETER

94%
Average Rating: 8.6/10
Reviews Counted: 82
Fresh: 77
Rotten: 5


Critics Consensus: Filmed and presented on a scale not seen in modern productions, Gone with the Wind is, if not the definitive Hollywood film, then certainly near the top of the list.

AUDIENCE SCORE

93%
liked it
Average Rating: 3.9/5
User Ratings: 292,794


people like to go out to see it on the big screen

I know film people who make up parties to go out to see it at revue cinemas.

It's not going anywhere soon, at least where there are educated film communites.

It seems to be particularly loved in a certain hipster community. Odd to me, but there it is. The ironically-cuffed-skinny-pants crowd likes it.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  4  
Reply Mon 28 Aug, 2017 03:01 pm
@jespah,
jespah wrote:
Maybe people would learn something and also understand the climate the film was made in.


on a parents' movie site


https://www.commonsensemedia.org/movie-reviews/gone-with-the-wind#


Quote:
TALK TO YOUR KIDS ABOUT ...
Families can talk about how the Civil War is portrayed in Gone with the Wind via the character of Scarlett O'Hara. How does the war affect her way of life? Does living through war change her personality, or does she remain the same throughout?

Scarlett is married several times for different reasons. Was marriage her only option at the time? What is different about her marriages to Charles, Frank, and then Rhett? Which of her marriages means the most to her and why?

Melanie is Scarlett's opposite in most ways. How do their personalities, values, and behavior differ? Why does Melanie forgive Scarlett over and over again?

How are African-Americans depicted in the movie? Would the portrayal of Civil War-era slavery be different if this 1939 movie were remade today?

How do the characters in Gone with the Wind demonstrate perseverance? Why is this an important character strength?


0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  3  
Reply Mon 28 Aug, 2017 03:08 pm
the 1939 Variety review

still holds true for the most part

http://variety.com/1939/film/reviews/gone-with-the-wind-2-1200412649/

snippity snippity

Quote:
From spectacle to intimate bedroom drama, Fleming kept a firm grip on the direction of the story. Task of holding audience attention for nearly three and three-quarter hours is a challenge to ingenuity and resourcefulness. That Fleming succeeds so well may be attributed to the manner in which he has highlighted his principals in every scene, regardless of the spectacular elements. Thus he has transferred into a moving and heart-rending stanza the panorama or wounded soldiers lying under the blazing sun in the Atlanta trainyards. There never is a static moment in the telling of the story. Fleming keeps characters and backgrounds on the move. Film started with George Cukor in the directorial spot. Fleming succeeded him and Sam Wood took over for a short period when Fleming was ill.

Every technical aspect of ‘Gone With the Wind’ bears the stamp of advanced craftsmanship. Despite the wide range of scenes depicted and characters shown there is unity of design and pattern. William Cameron Menzies supervised the general investiture and Lyle Wheeler was the art director. The authenticity of the furnishings, properties and apparel excites special interest. The job behind the screen was hefty in research and fabrication.

Same goes for all other off-screen contributions from other departments. Steiner restrained himself in his scoring from dipping into conventional melodic bathos. The ear catches strains from Stephen Foster, and occasional refrains from the large library of Civil War martial airs. Perhaps the highest praise which can be given to the Steiner work is that the score never pushes for favor above the dramatic action. Sound mixings were as smoothly achieved as the several visual montages.


still a great lesson plan in film-making
jespah
 
  5  
Reply Mon 28 Aug, 2017 04:44 pm
@ehBeth,
One point of discussion could be the chain from McDaniel accepting her Oscar in 1940 (and the contents of her speech) to Jackie Robinson and what he endured in 1947 to Brown v. Board of Ed. (1954) to Loving v. Virginia (1967).
0 Replies
 
Olivier5
 
  3  
Reply Tue 29 Aug, 2017 06:21 am
It's only gone from ONE theater... What's the big deal. It's not forbidden.

That's my wife's favorite movie BTW. She has seen it like 6 times...
Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Aug, 2017 01:49 pm
@Olivier5,
"It's only ONE.."


Similar thinking was also the start of Nazism and many other happenings in the world. Remember when the word went out that only "a handful of people" were going to take Donald Trump seriously or elevate him to the presidency? These things always start with just one. It just takes one to get the idea and then they get a second and then a third and those three each add three of their own. Before you know it, there's an epidemic.
Sturgis
 
  4  
Reply Tue 29 Aug, 2017 01:53 pm
@emmett grogan,
Gandhi was a lengthy movie too. If your criteria for tossing away movies is based on viewing time, then you'll need to ban that one too and several others.
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Aug, 2017 04:37 pm
@ossobucotemp,
A little late to post this now, but that uncle used to be a studio treasurer, or treasurers. I long ago lost track, and not sure re gwtw.
0 Replies
 
emmett grogan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Aug, 2017 04:49 pm
@Sturgis,
Not at all. I thoroughly enjoyed the over-sanitized version of Ghandi's life. It was well written, acted and filmed. The sets and location were beautiful and some totally breathtaking.

A lot of American troops were afraid that after the Japanese were beaten they'd be called in to support the British using strong force to put down expression of civil discontent over colonial rule in India.

Ghandi is a great film in my mind. I've sat through the double Godfather re-edit into one film and I loved it and I sat through a showing of the complete LOR trilogy in one continuous sitting. And I'd do it again, especially if its at the Alamo Drafthouse.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  3  
Reply Wed 30 Aug, 2017 10:50 am
@InfraBlue,
InfraBlue wrote:

Judging by the consensus on the removal of these kinds of things, I think that the publicity would be negative.

We live in a social media world. Any publicity (esp nationally) inevitably is good publicity.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Wed 30 Aug, 2017 10:52 am
@emmett grogan,
emmett grogan wrote:

Quote:
I very much doubt it would get an Oscar today.


Is there an Oscar© category for over-rated crapola? GWTW would be a shoe-in.

Crash (2004) My disdain for this PC-fetish film/dogsh!te awful Oscar stealer is well known throughout the internet. This could compete against GWTW for the overrated crapola award.
Foofie
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 30 Aug, 2017 02:34 pm
Are all of these posts from males? I say that since a female audience might have a constituency that consideres the movie "oh so romantic." And, that is what is seen, not the Civil War, or Butterfly McQueen (the actess that was the personal maid) saying her famous line, "Ah know nothin' about birthin' babies."
0 Replies
 
emmett grogan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Aug, 2017 03:25 pm
@tsarstepan,
Quote:
Crash


I've sat through it completely once. I've tried again and there's no way. But a lot of people seem to love it. I thought I was the only cringed at the methodicalness of it and no real plot. Its a premise that just shouldn't have been fleshed out.
0 Replies
 
Olivier5
 
  0  
Reply Thu 31 Aug, 2017 12:32 am
@Sturgis,
Serious Godwin case there.
roger
 
  4  
Reply Thu 31 Aug, 2017 12:54 am
@Olivier5,
Sounds good. It doesn't apply at all, but Godwin's Law always sounds all cool, and everything
Olivier5
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 31 Aug, 2017 01:22 am
@roger,
It does apply. Don't be a dolt.
0 Replies
 
Olivier5
 
  2  
Reply Thu 31 Aug, 2017 01:39 am
@Olivier5,
Officials at the Orpheum Theatre in Memphis have announced the film will not be shown during their summer movie series in 2018.... This is the 34th straight year it has screened at the theatre.
(from the Guardian)

The theatre patrons should apologize to every one on a2k for pulling off a movie they've been showing for 34 years... <sigh>

0 Replies
 
MethSaferThanTHC
 
  2  
Reply Sun 3 Sep, 2017 07:11 am
@Sturgis,
Dr MLK,JR died at that age (39)Political correctness is killing comedy. Right you are Steve Harvey
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Sep, 2017 04:24 am
@MethSaferThanTHC,
Absolute nonsense, the alternative comedy movement of the 1980s was a breath of fresh air. Far better than the tired old racist/sexist jokes that were never that funny to begin with. If you need to attack those worse off than you to have a laugh, you've not got much of a sense of humour in the first place.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  4  
Reply Sat 16 Sep, 2017 07:02 am
The first time I went to see the movie in a theater, the projector broke. I liked it well enough to go back the next night. Since then I have seen it three or four times and own a DVD of it. The film's limitations and failings are a product of the times. The author seemed to actually like her black creations. Rhett Butler says at one point that Mammy is the one person whose respect he really wants. He cultivates a friendship with her. Also at a key point in the story we rely on her to detail events, instead of seeing it happen.
 

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