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WA2K Radio is now on the air

 
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2004 08:42 am
Letty- I found them perfect theme song for our radio station:
http://www.geocities.com/Broadway/Stage/6886/
0 Replies
 
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2004 08:42 am
Hey, Panz. Where's your Elvis song? "Money Honey" would be soooooooo appropriate at this point. <smile>

Speaking of cars, I wish I could get Walter to post a picture here for me. One of these days, I'm gonna learn how to do it myself.

Yum, B.D. Cav and I have to watch our glucose, however. Crying or Very sad
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Wy
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2004 08:46 am
I'm just calling in to say I love this station! It's already replaced my old one on all the radios in my house!

And to answer a question from a couple pages ago, all U.S. stations don't begin with W... West of the Mississippi, it's K -- KOMO, KING, KSTW, etc. And Canadian stations begin with C -- I used to listen to CKLW when I lived in Cleveland, Ohio.

I don't know when the practice began, but it's within my lifetime. I remember when the Cleveland TV station KYW changed its call letters to WKYW.
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2004 08:53 am
Wy- Funny that you should mention call letters. Just happened to find a great history of radio call letters.

http://www.oldradio.com/archives/general/kwtrivia.htm

Now folks, let's give Wy a big hand for asking that teriffic question!
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panzade
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2004 08:57 am
Beginning in 1913, the United States government has generally separated the assignment of K and W call letters. For land stations, the original policy was that stations in the west normally got K-- calls, while W-- calls were issued to stations along the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic seaboard. The original K/W boundary ran north from the Texas-New Mexico border. However, in late January, 1923, the K/W boundary was shifted east to the Mississippi River. With this change, K's were assigned to all new grants west of the Mississippi. However, existing W stations that were located west of the Mississippi were allowed to keep their now non-standard calls.


NOTES: The source of the Mississippi River is in upper Minnesota, so using it as the K/W boundary leaves a gap in the northern part of the state. In 1987 the FCC noted that the current staff practice was to define the remainder of the boundary as "a line from the headwaters of the [Mississippi] to a point [at the Canadian border] just east of International Falls". For more information on U.S. call letter practices, check out Mystique of the Three-Letter Call Signs. There was also an anomaly that occurred for eleven months, from June 1920 through April 1921. For some reason, during this period almost all new land stations, east and west, got KU-- or KD-- four-letter calls. Finally, this review lists stations by their city-of-licence, and does not include stations which only had transmitters on the other side of the divide. (Call letters are assigned according to the station's city of licence--the location of its transmitter, even if it is on the other side of the divide, does not matter).

Reasons For The Exceptions
In reviewing the stations on the AM band, many people have noticed that some of them have the "wrong" first letter for the side of the Mississippi River on which they are located. In reviewing the last seventy-five years of call letter assignments for AM stations, I came up with six categories of non-conforming stations:

Stations located east of the Mississippi which were assigned calls from the KD-- ship block, instead of W--, during the June 1920 to April 1921 anomaly. (Two stations: KDKA and KDPM)


Stations west of the Mississippi River that were licenced before the late January 1923 boundary shift, and were located in the slice of W territory that existed west of the Mississippi prior to the shift. (Originally about 170 stations, not including Minnesota and Louisiana. However, due to very high deletion rates plus later call changes, only twelve of these original calls survive: WEW, WHB, WKY, WOC, WOI, WBAP, WDAF, WDAY, WJAG, WNAX, WOAI, and WTAW).


Portable stations (prior to 1928), which got W call letters because their original owners were located east of the Mississippi, but settled in a permanent home west of the Mississippi. (Four stations: WBBZ, WIBW, WLBN, and WMBH. There are no examples of a portable crossing in the other direction, i.e. no K portables "anchoring" in W territory).


Regular stations that changed their city of licence to the other side of the K/W divide. (Four stations: KFKX, KSGM, KWEM and WKBB. NOTE: This omits Louisiana and Minnesota.)


Owner requests--examples: WACO in Waco, Texas; WDBQ in Dubuque, Iowa; WMT (Waterloo [Iowa] Morning Tribune).


Assigned by the Government. (Three stations. KTGG in Spring Arbor, Michigan reportedly got the wrong initial letter because someone at the FCC thought it was located on the other side of the Mississippi River, specifically in Missouri. Also, this is somewhat speculative on my part, but two additional call assignments appear to have been selected by government regulators: KYWA Chicago, a booster station for KYW, and KOP, licenced to the Detroit Police Department.)

Finally, there are about a dozen stations for which I can not come up with any apparent reason--perhaps someone momentarily forgot about the policy, or where the boundary line was, or maybe I just need to do more research. The most prominent of these "undocumented" stations are KQV Pittsburgh, KSD Saint Louis (assigned before the boundary shift--now KTRS), and KYW Chicago (later Philadelphia and Cleveland).
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2004 08:58 am
oops Phoenix...I should have just linked
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2004 09:00 am
Phoenix, Fantastic! Noddy will appreciate the Dearie theme. Laughin' in remembrance of the ghosts of Christmas past.

The season wouldn't have a reason t'were it not for Ray Charles' and his up beat stuff: sooooooo, for you Charles' fans out there in radio land:

ยป Baby What'd I Say

Hey
mama
don't you treat me wrong
come and love your daddy all night long
alright now
hey hey
alright
See that girl with a diamond ring
she knows how to shake that thing
alright now
hey hey
hey hey
Tell your mama
tell your papa
I'm gonna sing you back to Arkansas
oh yes
mam
you don't do right
don't you're right
oh play it
boy
When you see me in misery
Come on baby
see my feet right
yeah
hey hey
alright
See the girl with the red dress on
She can do the birdland all night long
oh yeah
yeah
what'd I say
alright
Well
Tell me what'd I say
Tell me what'd I say
right now
Tell me what'd I say
Tell me what'd I say
right now
Tell me what'd I say
And
I wanna know
tell me I wanna know right now
Tell me I wanna know
Tell me I wanna know
right now
Tell me I wanna know...
HEY (HEY) OH (OH) ...
One more time
tell me one more time...

Hmmmm. Don't believe those lyrics were the same as I sang.

Well, Big Dice has reminded me that it's eatin' time.

Later, folks

Hey, Wy. Thanks for that bit of info. I knew the call letters would be different in other countries, but I had no idea they varied in other parts of the U.S.
0 Replies
 
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2004 09:26 am
Wow! panz. I read every bit of it. The local radio and TV station for which we worked was declared a monopoly some time back, and various media had to be sold. The family owned corporation was even written up in Time magazine, who referred to them as "benevolent despots".
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panzade
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2004 09:33 am
LOL
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2004 09:34 am
and here's a news flash for our resident Prince:
Health - AFP


India's "suicide tree" is also a tool for murder

Thu Nov 25, 1:37 PM ET Health - AFP



PARIS (AFP) - An Indian tree with poisonous fruit is used by more people to commit suicide than any other plant in the world and has a barely-investigated role in murder, French and Indian scientists say.









In one Indian state alone, deaths from the Cerbera odollam tree are running at an average of almost one a week, they say.


According to their investigations in the southwestern state of Kerala, 537 deaths can be attributed to odollam poisonings in the 11 years between 1989 and 1999, with the annual toll running from 11 to as high as 103.


"The odollam tree is responsible for about 50 percent of the plant poisoning cases and 10 percent of the total poisoning cases in Kerala," say the team, led by Yvan Gaillard of France's Laboratory of Analytical Toxicology.


"To the best of our knowledge, no plant in the world is responsible for as many deaths by suicide as the odollam tree."


Between 70 and 75 percent of suicide victims are women, raising questions about marital strife and in-law problems in India, and the fruit "is also occasionally used for homicide," according to their probe.


The odollam tree grows to a height of 15 metres (48 feet), with dark green lives and a milky white latex sap.


It has large white flowers with a delicate, jasmine-like perfume and a fruit that, when still green, looks like a small mango and is sometimes eaten by children, with tragic consequences.


Those who commit suicide mash up the white kernel with sugar and eat it, while for murder, "a few kernels are mixed with food containing plenty of chillies to cover the bitter taste of the poison. Death is likely to occur three-to-six hours after ingestion."


Odollam's weapon is a toxin called cerberin, which works by stopping the heart, which is why many poisonings -- unless samples are tested by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry -- are likely to to be written off as fatal heart attacks, Gaillard's team say.


The risk of using odollam for suicide or worse may also apply in countries where it does not grow naturally, because the fruit may be brought in by the Asian diaspora, Gaillard's team says.


Odollam is "an extremely toxic plant that is relatively unknown to western doctors, chemists, analysts and even coroners and forensic scientists."


Their study is published in the October issue of a US publication, the Journal of Ethnopharmacology. The British weekly New Scientist reports on the findings in next Saturday's issue.


C. odollam grows in coastal salt swamps and creeks in south India and along riverbanks in southern and central Vietnam, Cambodia, Sri Lanka and Myanmar. In Kerala, the tree is known as othalanga maram, while in the adjacent state of Tamil Nadu it is known as kattu arali.


In Southeast Asia, where the oily seeds are used as insect repellent or are burned for light, the common names for it are pong-pong, buta-buta or nyan.


One of its relatives, Cerbera venenifera, grows widely in Madagascar, and was used as an "ordeal poison" in previous centuries to determine guilt or innocence among suspected witches or groups accused of plotting against the king.


In Madagascar's central province, as many as 6,000 people are thought to have died in a single ordeal, according to a 1991 study.

Shocked
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panzade
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2004 09:39 am
Perfect theme song Phoenix
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Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2004 09:46 am
Hey, Letty! I don't see anything about weather or astrology. Can I be your correspondent who combines the two? Here's what I'm thinking...

On this day in the Astrological Plain:
Capricorns will find that their weather's gray and stormy.
Aquarius - you'll be looking at blue skies, dahling.
Pisces should look for rain.

It's going to be hot, hot, hot for Aries, today.
Taurus -- You'll be caught in the fog.
Gemini -- I'm of two minds on this, let's call it partly cloudy.

Cancer -- It doesn't matter, you'll be staying home.
Leo -- Of course, it's always sunny for you.
Virgo -- Stormy... but you can take it.

Libra -- A balance of wind & rain.
Scorpio -- Climb out of that cloud & check out the snow.
Sagittarius -- Good hunting weather, cold & crisp.
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2004 09:51 am
Absolutely, Piffka, You the astrologer; Misti the climatologist.

Climb out of that cloud and check out the snow? I don't think so, although it's really cool here this morning.
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Eva
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2004 09:55 am
Well, well, well...

Good morning, staff. As your new station manager, I'm calling an impromptu staff meeting. Everyone meet in the conference room in 1/2 hour. You'll find coffee, donuts and bagels on the credenza, just help yourself and find a seat. Legal pads and pens are provided at each seat, because you'll want to take notes. We have a few business matters that need to be settled.
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2004 10:05 am
Thank Goodness. Eva is wearing her power suit and is ready for business. I will leave the station in her well-manicured hands and get some stuff done. Cool
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Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2004 10:10 am
I'm tendering my resignation as political commentator and recommend that you put Realjohnboy in my chair as station grump.

I want to be the Hometown and Neigborhood Reporter with late breaking stories like :

Fourth Grade Class at Abraham Lincoln School raises $94.00 with Muffins.
or
Mrs. H.W. Phelps of Monina, Ill notes frost on her husband's pumpkins.
or
Missing Garbage Can Lids Are Still Missing.

And how come we weren't sent a memo about this meeting and why do we have to write stuff down? Can't we put it on our Palm Pilots? And who got these donuts? All the chocolate ones are already gone. Oh wait. I'm not the station whiner anymore...... never mind.

Joe
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Eva
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2004 10:19 am
Please have a seat, Letty and Joe. Don't worry, Joe, staff positions are on the agenda. <appropriating last chocolate donut>

We'll get started in a few minutes, just as soon as everyone gets here.
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Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2004 10:57 am
<uhmm> Good coffee. I like the little espresso cups.
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Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2004 11:12 am
I am free spirit, not really good with meetings and such. Just have someone summarize the notes and pass it under the door, I'll read it by candle light. Geez, I hope that's not against the fire code?
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Seed
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Dec, 2004 11:14 am
hey i can be the jantior that spreads gossip about...
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WA2K Radio is now on the air, Part 3 - Discussion by edgarblythe
 
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