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What Kind Of Citizen Do You Consider Yourself?

 
 
Reply Thu 4 Nov, 2004 12:02 pm
A citizen of your country or a citizen of the world?

And how does this view effect your politics and core beliefs?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 1,049 • Replies: 19
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val
 
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Reply Fri 5 Nov, 2004 07:04 am
Re: What Kind Of Citizen Do You Consider Yourself?
To be a citizen of the world we must be a citizen of our own country. My beliefs, convictions, have much to do with a culture and a civilization. In my case, not only those of a country but of a continent, Europe.
But we must be able to subject those values to a critic exam and confront them with other values from other countries or continents.
Criticism is the only way to be a citizen of the world, specially in this time of global information.
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Frank Apisa
 
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Reply Fri 5 Nov, 2004 09:50 am
Interesting question, Bear.

I consider mysself a human being first...and an American human being second.

I'm not sure that qualifies as favoring being a citizen of the world over being a citizen of my country...but I suspect it comes close enough to be considered an answer to your question.
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blueveinedthrobber
 
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Reply Fri 5 Nov, 2004 10:06 am
I kinda thought it was an interesting question myself Frank, and as usual the ones I think are going to be thought provoking are always the ones that end up ignored......if I want to chat I guess I better start a titties and analingus thread.... Laughing
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Grand Duke
 
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Reply Fri 5 Nov, 2004 10:29 am
This interests me BPB, but I'm off out to the pub soon so my (carefully considered) answer will have to wait till tomorrow.
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Frank Apisa
 
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Reply Fri 5 Nov, 2004 10:31 am
I think the current mood of the country deters people from acknowledging that they feel an affinity with fellow humans worldwide...that transcends the "I am patriotic...my country right or wrong" feelings that seem to be demanded these days.

Frankly, I love my country and am proud of much of what we do (until some of the shyt happening right now)...but I have lots of trouble trusting people who are too anxious to proclaim their patriotism. Love of country is fine...but there is a greater good that must be considered.
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Grand Duke
 
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Reply Fri 5 Nov, 2004 10:38 am
Frank Apisa wrote:
Love of country is fine...but there is a greater good that must be considered.


Frank - would you say that an example of this is the Kyoto agreement, and the way that Bush is refusing to sign (I believe) as it will 'harm' the US's economy or similar? That sometimes it is necessary to put the world before your own country?

(I won't be back till later, but I couldn't resist a little post before I went out.)
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Frank Apisa
 
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Reply Fri 5 Nov, 2004 11:07 am
Grand Duke wrote:
Frank Apisa wrote:
Love of country is fine...but there is a greater good that must be considered.


Frank - would you say that an example of this is the Kyoto agreement, and the way that Bush is refusing to sign (I believe) as it will 'harm' the US's economy or similar? That sometimes it is necessary to put the world before your own country?

(I won't be back till later, but I couldn't resist a little post before I went out.)


Well...you are getting the flavor of my comment...but this might not be a "best case" example.

One could easily argue that signing onto the Kyoto agreement is truly not putting the world before your county...but rather, putting short term benefit before long term disaster. One might also argue that is an example of a "penny wise; pound foolish" mentality.

In any case, by dissing the Kyoto agreement, our present government has done a disservice not only to the rest of the world, but to ourselves as well.
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Montana
 
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Reply Fri 5 Nov, 2004 11:28 am
I never thought to ask myself that question, but as much respect as I have for the rest of the world, I consider myself to be a Canadian citizen.
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FreeDuck
 
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Reply Fri 5 Nov, 2004 11:39 am
I think of myself as a citizen of the human race. I'm trying really hard to earn my keep as such. I find that I've been alternately proud and ashamed to be an American at varying times and, like Frank I am suspicious of those who proclaim their patriotism too loudly.
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Grand Duke
 
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Reply Fri 5 Nov, 2004 11:44 am
My limited knowledge of the Kyoto agreement is that it will restrict emissions of certain pollutants, which I thought would be for the benefit of the whole world, and the participant countries would make economic sacrifices to make it work, thereby putting the world before their own interests.

For illustrative purposes, can you think of a better example?

Back to BPB's original question. I try and think of the "bigger picture" on some matters - the environment, war etc - but then on other matters, it can be hard to watch your tax money being spent on housing bogus immigrants.
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Grand Duke
 
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Reply Fri 5 Nov, 2004 11:50 am
I find the concept of patriotism a strange one. Since all countries have changed size, shape, come into and out of existence over the centuries and millenia, how can anyone be so attached to one? Countries are a fleeting notion. I feel a kinship wth those who live near me, but that is not the same thing as patriotism.

And before anyone quotes my Location as an arguement against what I've just said, it is irony.
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Noddy24
 
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Reply Fri 5 Nov, 2004 01:38 pm
I feel blessed/cursed by multiple citizenships--but my core beliefs transcend all of them.
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thethinkfactory
 
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Reply Thu 11 Nov, 2004 11:03 am
I think the question is not only two faceted.

I think of myself as a Citizen (or member) of my family, then state, then country, then world. And I struggle to keep those in balance.

When we attacked Iraq - the rest of my 'citizenship' was personally offended and took precedence. When my mother was ill - the rest of my citizenship needed to take a back seat.

Great Question bi-polar.

I think I need to think more.

TTF

p.s. Good to see you Frank!
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thethinkfactory
 
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Reply Fri 12 Nov, 2004 09:08 am
Okay - after some thought - I wish to differentiate between two types of citizenry.

1) Legal Citizen: Where you have earned citizenship (either by being born or taking a test and submitting yourself to a social contract of that country).

2) Social Citizen: Where you are granted citizenship by those around you.

I live in Texas - and many legal citizens are not treated as social citizens - particularly if you are Mexican. Many of my aquiantences are treated like illegal immigrants - even though they are legal citizens.

I think the legal status you can earn - and the social status you cannot.

I also think there is a matter of choice - If I am born in America - and I do not like the social contract of this country I can choose (if I have the means) to leave this country and fulfill the legal requirements of becomeing a legal citizen in another.

However, I cannot earn the citizenry (legal or societal) of a place I do not live. I can claim human, earth, and American citizen - but I can not claim French citizenry unless I am materially there.

Just the thoughts I had about this greatg question.

TTF
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BoGoWo
 
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Reply Fri 12 Nov, 2004 09:16 am
while i despise 'nationalism' almost as much for its historically ill effects upon humanity as 'religion', i must admit, that i do consider myself "Canadian" in a sort of self defence; just in case i could be mistakenly be taken as being anything else!

[the informed Canadian citizen is, in my experience, truly concerned about the welfare of the entire planet.]
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boomerang
 
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Reply Fri 12 Nov, 2004 11:25 am
Honestly, I consider myself a citizen of my community. The fact that that community happens to be in America makes little difference in the way I conduct my life.

Realistically, my sphere of influence is very small. The only way I can make any change in the world is by trying to improve my little corner of it.

I suppose my only real core beliefs are to live simply and help where I can. I think that as a community citizen that I act on these beliefs daily.
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Thomas
 
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Reply Fri 12 Nov, 2004 11:27 am
World.
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Frank Apisa
 
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Reply Fri 12 Nov, 2004 11:30 am
Thomas wrote:
World.


Hey Thomas

I had dinner last night with Blatham. He mentioned that you were in town earlier.

Hey man...next time you are in the Big Apple...lemme know. I'd really like the chance to meet you.

Joe Nation, Blatham, Lola and I get together often for a drink...and some good conversations.
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Thomas
 
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Reply Fri 12 Nov, 2004 11:34 am
Frank Apisa wrote:
Hey man...next time you are in the Big Apple...lemme know. I'd really like the chance to meet you.

Joe Nation, Blatham, Lola and I get together often for a drink...and some good conversations.

Sounds great! I'll be happy to drop in on one of them when I'm around the next time.
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