1
   

BCE, CE, and ACE or BC and AD

 
 
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2003 09:02 pm
Which system do you prefer to use when identifying past eras?


Kenneth G. Wilson (1923-). The Columbia Guide to Standard American English. 1993.

A.D., B.C., (A.)C.E., B.C.E.

A.D. (or AD) is an abbreviation for anno Domini, "[in] the year of our Lord," for dates after the year conventionally numbered 1, and B.C. (or BC) stands for "before Christ," for dates before that year. A.D. appears either before or after the number of the year (A.D. 1066 or 1066 A.D.), although conservative use has long preferred before only; B.C. always follows the number of the year (55 B.C.). The use of the periods is a matter of style.

Recently B.C.E., meaning either "before the Christian era" or more frequently "before the common era," has had some champions, but Edited English seems only rarely to have adopted it thus far. (A.)C.E., "(after the) common (or Christian) era," seems to have prospered even less, perhaps because some regard it as slighting Christianity (which is ironic, given that both alternatives were proposed to avoid the possible disrespect implied by the more popular terms). Common era (C.E.) itself needs a good deal of further justification, in view of its clearly Christian numbering. Most conservatives still prefer A.D. and B.C. Best advice: don't use B.C.E., C.E., or A.C.E. to replace B.C. and A.D. without translating the new terms for the very large number of readers who will not understand them. Note too that if we do end by casting aside the A.D./B.C. convention, almost certainly some will argue that we ought to cast aside as well the conventional numbering system itself, given its Christian basis. At present the familiar Latin/English convention has the considerable advantage of being the one most of the world's written languages use in communicating with cultures other than their own. SeeDates
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 28,318 • Replies: 36
No top replies

 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2003 09:15 pm
I like BCE, I'd prefer it's use over AD
0 Replies
 
LarryBS
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2003 09:32 pm
I just ran across one style guide that mentions B.P., or "Before Present," same as B.C. and B.C.E. - never heard of it before.
0 Replies
 
husker
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2003 09:43 pm
hmmm
6 of one - half dozen of another
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2003 09:44 pm
BP - is it an ever-changing demarkation? Is demarkation a word?
0 Replies
 
LarryBS
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2003 10:27 pm
http://relations.ansme.com/

demarcation

1. a conceptual separation or demarcation
"there is a narrow line between sanity and insanity"
Synonyms: line, dividing line, contrast

2. the boundary of a specific area
Synonyms: limit , demarcation line
0 Replies
 
satt fs
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2003 10:44 pm
Symmetry: 4 C.E. <-> 5 B.C.E.
Asymmetry: A.D. 4 <-> 5 B.C.
0 Replies
 
timberlandko
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2003 10:47 pm
It is but the semantic antics of the pedantic, and no gives cause to become frantic.



timber
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2003 10:50 pm
LarryBS wrote:
http://relations.ansme.com/

demarcation

1. a conceptual separation or demarcation
"there is a narrow line between sanity and insanity"
Synonyms: line, dividing line, contrast

2. the boundary of a specific area
Synonyms: limit , demarcation line


Thanks.... and for the highlight too Rolling Eyes
0 Replies
 
LarryBS
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2003 11:29 pm
I thought the 'k' might be the British Way, but it isn't.

Some days those red words ring true!
0 Replies
 
JoanneDorel
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2003 11:32 pm
Pedantic, hmmm - goes well with hubris
0 Replies
 
satt fs
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2003 11:49 pm
This question can be one of practical (e.g., for programmers).
0 Replies
 
Asherman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2003 11:55 pm
I almost always use BCE and CE. It really makes little difference so long as we all know what periods are being discussed.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Feb, 2003 01:56 am
In German (exactly: in Germany) AD and (the equivalent of) BC are more commonly, since (the equivalent of = translated term would be : 'turn of the era') BCE and CE are related to the communist terminology in the GDR.
0 Replies
 
JoanneDorel
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Feb, 2003 09:04 am
Really Walter why?
0 Replies
 
JoanneDorel
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Feb, 2003 09:05 am
Walter I am curious as to why these terms would be related to communist terminology in the GDR?
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Feb, 2003 09:51 am
B.C & A.D. Only because I'm used to them.
0 Replies
 
New Haven
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Feb, 2003 02:17 pm
BCE is "Before the common era.

AD: is still used. I've never seen ADE used anywhere.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Feb, 2003 02:33 pm
Well, just because "turn of the ers" has been in use in the GDR since the beginning of that state, during a time, when no-one else in Europe used others than AD and BC.
(Actually, this has been changing. However, for us older, well, we stick conservatively to the old, ever used terms.)
0 Replies
 
JoanneDorel
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Feb, 2003 02:42 pm
New Haven the only time I have heard or read the terms ACE, CE, and ACE used are in lectures about art history and archeological finds have been discussed.

Thank you Walter, yes we old folks are more comfortable with the terms we have used most of our lives. BC and AD where the only terms I used other than geological eras until I heard ACE, CE, and BCE used in the early 90s.

Link to Common Era Calendar
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Facs on the Famous - Discussion by gollum
URGENT!!! (BEER STATISTICS) - Question by Sarah17
WHAT TIME IS IT NOW? - Question by farmerman
Are Print Encyclopedias Obsolete? - Discussion by Phoenix32890
what d'you call a prince? - Discussion by Endymion
Collecting - Numismatics - Discussion by gollum
What a Trip - Discussion by gollum
New York State Economy - Discussion by gollum
Finding Old Articles - Discussion by gollum
 
  1. Forums
  2. » BCE, CE, and ACE or BC and AD
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 09/20/2021 at 03:30:59