5
   

why does straight A's have an apostrophe?

 
 
Reply Wed 5 Apr, 2017 08:16 pm
I don't understand why.

Thanks!
 
roger
 
  3  
Reply Wed 5 Apr, 2017 08:29 pm
@perennialloner,
I think it's only used so that it doesn't look like the word 'as'.
layman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Apr, 2017 09:02 pm
@roger,
roger wrote:

I think it's only used so that it doesn't look like the word 'as'.
I agree that would be a good reason, but I'm not sure it's the reason, Rog. Seems like that's usually done when you want to pluralize a single letter, e.g., B's, C's, D's, etc.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Apr, 2017 09:07 pm
@layman,
Well yeah, but that almost sounds like we do it because we do it.
layman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Apr, 2017 09:09 pm
@roger,
Exactly! That's the way it is with words, eh? Actually, it's probably useful to avoid confusing constructions like fs or rs. The convention seems to be to capitialize the single letter, insert the apostrophe, then end with the s.
maxdancona
 
  2  
Reply Wed 5 Apr, 2017 09:09 pm
@roger,
roger wrote:

Well yeah, but that almost sounds like we do it because we do it.


Isn't this the explanation for every grammar rule in English?
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Apr, 2017 09:10 pm
@layman,
Smile
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Apr, 2017 09:11 pm
@maxdancona,
Except that the 's usually indicates a contraction or a possessive. I think the OP was hoping for a little more.
0 Replies
 
perennialloner
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Apr, 2017 09:18 pm
just to be clear, only letter grades follow this rule?
layman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Apr, 2017 09:22 pm
@perennialloner,
perennialloner wrote:

just to be clear, only letter grades follow this rule?


No, I don't think it's limited to that. I might say, for example, "remove all the J's from that word."
perennialloner
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Apr, 2017 09:32 pm
@layman,
letters, then?
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Apr, 2017 09:40 pm
@perennialloner,
People differ on the do's and don'ts of using an apostrophe for plural nouns.
layman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Apr, 2017 09:48 pm
@perennialloner,
perennialloner wrote:

letters, then?


Yeah, I think so. See my second post (I added to it, earlier).
0 Replies
 
perennialloner
 
  2  
Reply Wed 5 Apr, 2017 09:54 pm
@maxdancona,
greengrocer's apostrophe: An apostrophe used incorrectly to form the plural of a noun through ignorance of the use of the apostrophe.

I was under the impression the people who differ are just uninformed of the correct grammar.

EDIT: i think people tend to put apostrophes after plural nouns ending in vowel letters to make it easier to read/look better? i'm not entirely sure.

do's and don'ts

otherwise it makes no sense for you to put an apostrophe for do's and not don'ts to make it don't's
ekename
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Apr, 2017 10:11 pm
This is as straight as straight As get:

If ifs and ands were pots and pans there'd be no work for tinkers' hands.

0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Apr, 2017 06:30 am
@perennialloner,
Quote:
greengrocer's apostrophe: An apostrophe used incorrectly to form the plural of a noun through ignorance of the use of the apostrophe.

I was under the impression the people who differ are just uninformed of the correct grammar.


Ignorance? Bullshit!

English has not been spoken with the correct "grammar" in the past 500 years. People keep speaking English in the way that makes sense to them, and eventually the "grammarians" catch up.

The grammarians used to say it was incorrect for you to boldly go forth, to have an agenda, to note what the data says, to find a free seat, or to have a fun time. This sentence would be frowned upon by grammarians of the past. But, once something makes enough sense to enough people to become common usage, it becomes correct.

English belongs to the "greengrocers".




jespah
 
  2  
Reply Thu 6 Apr, 2017 07:14 am
@perennialloner,
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/apostrophe-catastrophe-part-two?page=1
0 Replies
 
PUNKEY
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Apr, 2017 09:38 am
from Better Punctuation

The Exceptional Apostrophe
Single letters, numbers, symbols, and words used as terms look awkward when written as plurals without any punctuation, so we generally add an apostrophe s to them.

There are two a's in the word "separate."

His grades are all in the high 90's.

Can you change this 10 for two 5's?

He lived in the 1960's. I live in the 2000's.

(This answered my question about New Year's Eve.)

Lash
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Apr, 2017 10:40 am
In one of my English classes at UGA, my professor followed my example using As and 1980s, and asked the class to lose those apostrophes.

πŸ’•It was love.
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Apr, 2017 10:45 am
@maxdancona,
maxdancona wrote:

People differ on the do's and don'ts of using an apostrophe for plural nouns.


Good example. Even the most violent apostrophe haters have to write "do's." And the choice of "don'ts" is confounding too.
0 Replies
 
 

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