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Seeking recommendation of poems and/or poets that focuses on nature

 
 
Reply Thu 9 Feb, 2017 09:51 pm
I am interested in poets and/or poems that the subject matter focuses on nature. Trees, flowers, the wind, the rain, waterfalls, caverns, mountains, rivers, lakes, leaves, the sun, the moon, the stars, hills, beaches, the ocean, or anything else involving nature.

Are there any poets and authors anyone can recommend? Are there any poems anyone can recommend? Does anyone have poems of their own they can share?
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 9 Feb, 2017 09:54 pm
Do you want established favorites, such as Robert Frost, or something a bit obscure?
Real Music
 
  2  
Reply Thu 9 Feb, 2017 09:59 pm
@edgarblythe,
Quote:
Do you want established favorites, such as Robert Frost, or something a bit obscure?
Any poem, any poet, any source. Include the established. Also include the new.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Thu 9 Feb, 2017 10:08 pm
Introduction to Evangeline: A Tale of Acadie
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, 1807 - 1882

This is the forest primeval. The murmuring pines and the hemlocks,
Bearded with moss, and in garments green, indistinct in the twilight,
Stand like Druids of old, with voices sad and prophetic,
Stand like harpers hoar, with beards that rest on their bosoms.
Loud from its rocky caverns, the deep-voiced neighboring ocean
Speaks, and in accents disconsolate answers the wail of the forest.

This is the forest primeval; but where are the hearts that beneath it
Leaped like the roe, when he hears in the woodland the voice of the huntsman?
Where is the thatch-roofed village, the home of Acadian farmers,--
Men whose lives glided on like rivers that water the woodlands,
Darkened by shadows of earth, but reflecting an image of heaven?
Waste are those pleasant farms, and the farmers forever departed!
Scattered like dust and leaves, when the mighty blasts of October
Seize them, and whirl them aloft, and sprinkle them far o’er the ocean.
Naught but tradition remains of the beautiful village of Grand-Pré.

Ye who believe in affection that hopes, and endures, and is patient,
Ye who believe in the beauty and strength of woman’s devotion,
List to the mournful tradition still sung by the pines of the forest;
List to a Tale of Love in Acadie, home of the happy.
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  3  
Reply Thu 9 Feb, 2017 10:48 pm
@Real Music,
The poets of the Romantic movement (Wordsworth, Byron, Keats, Shelley) will provide you with many poems that focus on nature.

For example, Wordsworth wrote, "My heart leaps up when I behold a rainbow in the sky." (That's the first line and title. I'm sure you can find it online.)
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  3  
Reply Fri 10 Feb, 2017 01:42 am
Quote:
John Clare was an English poet, the son of a farm labourer, who came to be known for his celebratory representations of the English countryside and his lamentation of its disruption. His poetry underwent a major re-evaluation in the late 20th century and he is often now considered to be among the most important 19th-century poets. His biographer Jonathan Bate states that Clare was "the greatest labouring-class poet that England has ever produced. No one has ever written more powerfully of nature, of a rural childhood, and of the alienated and unstable self".



https://www.poemhunter.com/john-clare/<br />

All nature has a feeling: woods, fields, brooks
Are life eternal: and in silence they
Speak happiness beyond the reach of books;
There's nothing mortal in them; their decay
Is the green life of change; to pass away
And come again in blooms revivified.
Its birth was heaven, eternal it its stay,
And with the sun and moon shall still abide
Beneath their day and night and heaven wide.
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Fri 10 Feb, 2017 03:18 am




The Darkling Thrush

I leant upon a coppice gate,
When Frost was spectre-gray,
And Winter's dregs made desolate
The weakening eye of day.
The tangled bine-stems scored the sky
Like strings of broken lyres,
And all mankind that haunted nigh
Had sought their household fires.

The land's sharp features seemed to me
The Century's corpse outleant,
Its crypt the cloudy canopy,
The wind its death-lament.
The ancient pulse of germ and birth
Was shrunken hard and dry,
And every spirit upon earth
Seemed fervorless as I.

At once a voice arose among
The bleak twigs overhead,
In a full-hearted evensong
Of joy illimited.
An aged thrush, frail, gaunt and small,
With blast-beruffled plume,
Had chosen thus to fling his soul
Upon the growing gloom.

So little cause for carolings
Of such ecstatic sound
Was written on terrestrial things
Afar or nigh around,
That I could think there trembled through
His happy good-night air
Some blessed Hope, whereof he knew,
And I was unaware.

Thomas Hardy
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Feb, 2017 03:43 am
@hightor,
I had to learn that word for word when I did my O levels.
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Fri 10 Feb, 2017 05:49 am
@izzythepush,
I wonder if memorizing verse is still widely practiced in schools? My guess, at least in the USA, would be no.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Feb, 2017 06:07 am
@hightor,
Not over here either, I did my O levels a long time ago.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Feb, 2017 07:08 am
@Real Music,
My favorite book of poetry:
Haiku: This Other World – by Richard Wright
0 Replies
 
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Feb, 2017 09:59 am
@hightor,
The nuns made us memorize, or try to, but that was in the 1950's US.
I wonder if teachers still do, perhaps in some english major university classes, but that seems unlikely.
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Feb, 2017 10:04 am
@ossobucotemp,
Another thought: are there poetry readings available in new handy devices for people taking long walks?
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Fri 10 Feb, 2017 10:56 am
@ossobucotemp,
I think Gilbert Gottfried has released a tape.
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Fri 10 Feb, 2017 11:58 am
@ossobucotemp,
Quote:
...but that was in the 1950's US.

Ah yes. I remember being assigned to memorize poems as punishment back then.

When you consider that for most of human history we had an oral culture where memorization was the only method we had of handing down knowledge and stories over the course of many generations...mind boggling. I believe there are pious Muslims who routinely memorize the Koran, and probably the same with other contemporary religions, but we're talking about prodigious memories, people able to recite the names of their ancestors going back scores of generations, people able to recite the long epic poems which recounted their history. So, when that skill is abandoned in favor of written records, what's been lost? And when written records are abandoned in favor of electronic storage and retrieval, what's been lost? In my case, penmanship has taken a real beating.
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Feb, 2017 02:55 pm
@Real Music,
Try Loren Eiseley

https://able2know.org/topic/16748-1
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Feb, 2017 03:05 pm
@hightor,
hightor wrote:

I wonder if memorizing verse is still widely practiced in schools? My guess, at least in the USA, would be no.


I live in the US and yes, we had to memorize certain poems - we had a choice. My daughter who is in high school now also had to choose a poem and recite it in class. Those that did the best actually participated in a competition.

So yes it is widely practiced in US schools.

Also - Robert Frost has many poems with nature within it - Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening (one I didn't have to memorize but since others in the class did - by hearing it so much I have memorized pretty much remember most of it to this day).
0 Replies
 
 

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