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Roof Death Penalty

 
 
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 04:20 pm
I am anti death penalty. Anyway, he ought to be forced to live without hope of release in tight security the next 70 or 80 years.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 10 • Views: 1,838 • Replies: 73

 
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edgarblythe
 
  11  
Reply Tue 10 Jan, 2017 04:28 pm
@layman,
Screw off.
0 Replies
 
Sturgis
 
  3  
Reply Wed 11 Jan, 2017 12:04 am
@edgarblythe,
I was hoping he'd be receiving life with no chance of parole.

That said, a death sentence can torment on its own, what with all the appeals that must be given. Each appeal, whether Roof wishes to live or be executed causes mental anguish as he stresses over what the outcome will be. He doesn't seem to have any remorse, so, it'll be up to those on the inside to learn him and learn him good!
edgarblythe
 
  3  
Reply Wed 11 Jan, 2017 05:41 am
@Sturgis,
Roof is one of the lowest forms of humanity of all. My position against the death penalty has nothing to do with shielding vermin such as he, as has been charged by some against me in the past. Keeping him away from society is my main goal.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 Jan, 2017 09:13 am
@edgarblythe,
You're quite right. The death penalty is barbaric, end of.
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Wed 11 Jan, 2017 10:21 am
@izzythepush,
Too, there have been too many falsely convicted to trust the system to get it right.
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  2  
Reply Wed 11 Jan, 2017 10:49 am
@izzythepush,
Incarceration in a US prison is also barbaric, for that matter.

The comparability of the degree of barbarism is debatable, however.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  4  
Reply Wed 11 Jan, 2017 04:13 pm
Roof deserves to die, however I don't want our government to have the power to kill any of its citizens. That power has been and will again be abused.

Locking him away for the rest of his life would not have been a "light" penalty, and if it doesn't exactly match his crime, then so be it. The greater issue is liberty from tyranny.
0 Replies
 
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 Jan, 2017 05:09 pm
@edgarblythe,
I agree.

On the other hand, we have instituted many who did relatively little wrong. That has begun to change, but who knows now.
edgarblythe
 
  5  
Reply Wed 11 Jan, 2017 06:46 pm
@ossobucotemp,
In the so called freedom of America we have some of the dumbest reasons to incarcerate plus give very long sentences. I just read about a man who got 26 years for taking a remote control. In their defense, officials pointed at the man's long rap sheet.
georgeob1
 
  2  
Reply Wed 11 Jan, 2017 08:47 pm
Mr Roof committed a bloody, premeditated crime, killing multiple totally innocent people, who had done him no harm, and presented no threat to him or anyone else. He showed not a bit of remorse or regret for his awful deed. The death penalty was entirely appropriate and should be carried out without delay.
layman
 
  -3  
Reply Wed 11 Jan, 2017 09:10 pm
@georgeob1,
georgeob1 wrote:

Mr Roof committed a bloody, premeditated crime, killing multiple totally innocent people, who had done him no harm, and presented no threat to him or anyone else. He showed not a bit of remorse or regret for his awful deed. The death penalty was entirely appropriate and should be carried out without delay.


Exactly, George. There is no question of guilt here. Why any cheese-eater wants to support him at the cost of about $100,000 a year for the next 50 years or so is incomprehensible to me.

Do they actually think they have proved that they are superior people who hold the "moral high ground," is that it?
McGentrix
 
  2  
Reply Wed 11 Jan, 2017 09:18 pm
Roof has no possible contribution to society or the human kind. I don't think I'd like to have the chance that in 20 years a sympathetic judge decides that Roof is a changed man and he deserves a second chance in society. If anyone deserves the death penalty, he is a very qualified candidate.
layman
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 11 Jan, 2017 09:31 pm
@layman,
layman wrote:


Why any cheese-eater wants to support him at the cost of about $100,000 a year for the next 50 years or so is incomprehensible to me.

Do they actually think they have proved that they are superior people who hold the "moral high ground," is that it?


I mean, like, what kinda "moral code" would say that if you kill my brother, then you have imposed a duty on me to take care of you for the rest of your life? The Michael Dukakis code of cheese-eaters, maybe?

I can't believe that red-blooded Americans have gone so soft, not to mention suicidal and stupid.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  4  
Reply Wed 11 Jan, 2017 10:26 pm
@McGentrix,
No one sentenced to life without parole has ever been released on parole, in California or in any other state. Prisoners sentenced to LWOP actually remain in prison for the rest of their lives and die in prison.

All sentences, including the death penalty, are equally subject to clemency from the governor. However, no Democratic or Republican governor has ever granted clemency to a prisoner serving an LWOP sentence in California, and no such prisoner has ever been released on parole.

The last time a governor used his power of executive clemency in a murder case was more than 30 years ago, when Ronald Reagan commuted the death sentence of a mentally ill inmate to a life sentence.
https://www.aclunc.org/article/truth-about-life-without-parole-condemned-die-prison
0 Replies
 
Kolyo
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 Jan, 2017 10:38 pm
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

I just read about a man who got 26 years for taking a remote control.


He made the mistake of calling his girlfriend as a character witness, and she begrudgingly admitted he had a long history of stealing remotes.
0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  0  
Reply Wed 11 Jan, 2017 11:03 pm
The underlying point here is that punishment for awful crimes such as this is done for reform or retribution, but for the example it creates. That is what justice is for.
layman
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 11 Jan, 2017 11:21 pm
@georgeob1,
georgeob1 wrote:

The underlying point here is that punishment for awful crimes such as this is [not] done for reform or retribution, but for the example it creates. That is what justice is for.


I assume you intended to insert the word "not" where I did, eh, George?
0 Replies
 
layman
 
  0  
Reply Thu 12 Jan, 2017 12:50 am
@georgeob1,
There was a time when executions (whether by hanging, guillotine, or whatever method) were highly public events, often held in the "town square" at a time when most people could attend.

Parents often made it a point to bring their children to witness such events. Sure, it was an extremely unpleasant sight for children, and one they would probably never forget.

That was the whole point. See it. Don't forget it. This is what will happen to you if you grow up to commit heinous crimes.

These days, nobody can be allowed to "see" an execution. And some brutal child-raping and murdering psychopath cannot be allowed to endure the slightest amount of discomfort. He must be painlessly "put to sleep."

It's possible that if there were more stark, more public ways of dealing with these horrendous monsters, fewer children would grow up thinking it was acceptable to be just like them.

As George noted, this Roof perv was not the least bit remorseful. He probably is, in his mind, a noteworthy person who is "famous" and who has probably gained heroic status with the KKK-type crowds. He probably never expected to be executed, but instead living a long, secure life in prison where he could enjoy his "celebrity" status.
 

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