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Definition of compounding

 
 
Nat093
 
Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2016 12:24 pm
Could you please tell me if the defintion for the compounding process I provided below is written correctly in terms of grammar?

Compounding (also called composition) may be defined as a process whereby two or more lexical items (nouns, verbs, adjectives, or prepositions) are combined to form a new complex word. The product, traditionally called a compound, functions grammatically and semantically as a single unit.
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Type: Question • Score: 1 • Views: 646 • Replies: 19
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dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2016 12:34 pm
@Nat093,
Nat to me it sounds really well-writ. However, I've never heard it called "composition"
dupre
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2016 12:59 pm
@Nat093,
I like the definition, but I also have never heard that called composition. I looked composition up in Merriam Webster's online dictionary. Although, some of the definitions might seem to apply, I've never heard that term used in this sense. I have read at least 12 books on editing and many more on writing. I also studied four foreign languages and have a four-year degree in English from a university. I hope that helps lend some credence to my statement.
dalehileman
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2016 01:23 pm
@dupre,
Thanks Dup. By sheerest coincidence I've also worn out a couple of Webster's's; have never heard the term so used; had, well, one language (German, HS); got BS in Journ

Your credence exceeds mine by far
dupre
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2016 01:37 pm
@dalehileman,
You are very kind to say that.
dalehileman
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2016 01:43 pm
@dupre,
But, Pre, it's true
Except to the (nearly half) who seem terribly angry at all times about nearly everything. However I doubt if you've ever been their vict

Forgive pun
Best of everything forever

http://able2know.org/topic/359224-1
dupre
 
  0  
Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2016 02:13 pm
@dalehileman,
I've been following that thread and find it most distasteful. I also believe that there still is a place for forums such as this. One can hardly reach out to one's friends and family on Facebook to discuss a wide variety of subjects in any detail.
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2016 05:10 pm
@dupre,
Quote:
and find it most distasteful
Bur Pre which part and in what way

Quote:
still is a place for forums such as this
Of course there is; don't remember saying there isn't

Quote:
One can hardly reach out...on Facebook... in any detail.
But why so
0 Replies
 
dupre
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2016 05:53 pm
@dalehileman,
I sympathize with you, but don't care to get involved not knowing all the details and not wanting to spend time reviewing them all.

Sorry.

I can only imagine your discomfort. I know I would be very unhappy.

I cannot offer anything more than that at this point.

I don't even have any advice, but did review your thread asking for some.

Thank you for reaching out to me to engage; however, this time, I must pass.
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2016 06:18 pm
@dupre,
Quote:
don't care to get involved ..I must pass
Quite okay Dup
dupre
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2016 06:49 pm
@dalehileman,
You really are quite kind!
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 12:21 pm
@dupre,
Not at all, Dup; but now let's hear from those apparently angry at all times about nearly everything

You presently #22
dupre
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 01:05 pm
@dalehileman,
I'm sorry. What does that mean? #22?
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 02:06 pm
@dupre,
Quote:
#22?
http://able2know.org/topic/358635-3#post-6328106
0 Replies
 
Nat093
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 05:05 pm
Thank you very much Smile
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 05:06 pm
@Nat093,
Why, not at all Nat
0 Replies
 
Nat093
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Dec, 2016 07:13 am
As for the term 'composition', some morphologists do provide this term as an alternative to 'compounding', but I agree that it is much rarely used. I thought that it should mention about that as well.
Nat093
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Dec, 2016 04:36 am
@Nat093,
And I want to say that

"Compounding (sometimes also called composition) may be defined as a process whereby two or more lexical items (including nouns, adjectives, verbs, and prepositions) are combined to form a new complex word. The/A product of this process is traditionally referred to as a compound. "

should I say "A product of this process", or "The product of this process"?
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Dec, 2016 05:01 am
@Nat093,
Nat093 wrote:
should I say "A product of this process", or "The product of this process"?

You started a new thread with this question, which has been answered.
0 Replies
 
Nat093
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Dec, 2016 05:44 am
@dalehileman,
Dalehileman, I have doubts as to the use of the article 'the' before 'product' in my definition. By 'product' I mean a word produced through the process of compounding. Shouldn't I use "A product"? As in:

"Compounding (also called composition) may be defined as a process whereby two or more lexical items (nouns, verbs, adjectives, or prepositions) are combined to form a new complex word. A product, traditionally called a compound, functions grammatically and semantically as a single unit."


URL: http://able2know.org/topic/359223-1
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