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Britain and Indian immigration

 
 
Kolyo
 
Reply Wed 23 Nov, 2016 11:43 pm
My father's family in England was barely middle class, and Dad benefited greatly from a free education at a top UK university. Then, because he liked America better, he left the UK. All that expense to educate him, and he left! It was Britain's loss and America's gain, part of a larger "brain drain" that went on at the time. Allowing highly educated immigrants a path to citizenship is a good thing for the country they are immigrating to.

So if a talented young Indian engineer grows up in an environment of heavy tutoring and rigorous academic standards at his school, and if he moves to Britain, then surely it's the UK's gain, and India's loss? And not the other way around? (Based on my sister's and my experiences in university with classmates from India, they really are very well-educated when they get to the West, having met an academic standard at the secondary level that far surpasses our own.)

That makes this section of The Economist a little difficult to follow:

Quote:

Theresa May, Britain's prime minister, went to India on her first stop for sounding out post-Brexit trade deals. Although Mrs. May talked of shared connections and values her counterpart, Narendra Modi, seemed more concerned about visas and restrictions on Indian immigration to Britain. Despite Mrs. May's attempt to present her visit as a success it underlined the difficulties for post-Brexit Britain.


Will she welcome engineers at least?
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blatham
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Nov, 2016 04:19 am
@Kolyo,
If an A2K member from Britain can't help you out here, Kolyo, I think you'll have to dig in a bit to find out what "restrictions" are in place.

Also, it's really helpful to toss in a link to your source material so others can refer to it and help you dig out the information you are curious about.
Kolyo
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Nov, 2016 08:39 am
@blatham,
It was the print edition. And there was no further context. It was just a summary of the news of the week. I'll do some digging myself. Perhaps I'll find an online story about the same thing.
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ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Nov, 2016 10:16 am
@Kolyo,
Kolyo wrote:
It was Britain's loss and America's gain, part of a larger "brain drain" that went on at the time. Allowing highly educated immigrants a path to citizenship is a good thing for the country they are immigrating to.

So if a talented young Indian engineer grows up in an environment of heavy tutoring and rigorous academic standards at his school, and if he moves to Britain, then surely it's the UK's gain, and India's loss? And not the other way around?



from what I've been reading about what's happening in the world right now, the difference is that the first example is white to white and the second example isn't

disturbing
Kolyo
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Nov, 2016 11:07 am
@ehBeth,
There is also the "immigrants are taking our jobs" argument.

I wish people would see how misguided that is. It makes the assumption that the number of jobs won't go up if new people come to the country. But the newcomers create new jobs even as they fill old ones.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Nov, 2016 11:17 am
@Kolyo,
It's not simply about immigrants taking jobs. 'It's about immigrants of different colours taking jobs. We see it in Canada , even if it's a tiny bit more hidden than in some other countries.
blatham
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Nov, 2016 01:12 pm
@ehBeth,
Quote:
of different colours

On another thread here, I've had cause to link Dan Gardner's incredible long series on the history of the drug wars that ran in the Ottawa Citizen years ago. One of the bits of history I learned there was the connection between our early anti-drug laws and Chinese immigration.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Nov, 2016 02:03 pm
@blatham,
Here's a good article on immigrants and jobs.
http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2015/05/actually-immigration-can-create-jobs/391997/

Silicon Valley is a good example of immigration creating jobs. Our area attracts the best and brightest from around the world to work in the high tech industry. It creates higher demand on housing, and we see new developments under construction in our area. The biggest problem is the rising cost of housing in our area.

I just don't understand how the supply can keep up with the demand when Apple is building a new office complex that will house over 12,000 workers.

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