3
   

What Black Lives Matter Is Really All About

 
 
Mon 8 Aug, 2016 07:42 pm

What Black Lives Matter Is Really All About

It’s time to dispel some myths about the movement.
07/22/2016 01:25 pm ET
5.7k

Rahel Gebreyes Editor, HuffPost Video

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/black-lives-matter_us_578ffe17e4b0bdddc4d312c1?section=&section=us_black-voices

Since the conversation about police brutality was reignited by the police killings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, people nationwide have once again come together to protest and reaffirm the importance of black lives. But as the Black Lives Matter movement has grown, it has at times become mischaracterized and some people have lost sight of the true meaning behind the phrase “black lives matter.”

The Huffington Post spoke with activists, journalists and organizers to set the record straight about the movement.

“Black Lives Matter is first and foremost an affirmation. It is a love note to ourselves from us to us,” Nakisha Lewis, an organizer with New York City’s Black Lives Matter chapter, says in the video above.

The movement was founded by Alicia Garza, Opal Tometi and Patrisse Cullors in hopes of speaking out against the “unjust killings of black men and women,” The Huffington Post’s Lilly Workneh adds. The women, who designed the hashtag to be inclusive, coined the phrase “black lives matter” after George Zimmerman was acquitted in the killing of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin.

“We are focusing on the issues of black incarcerated folks, formerly incarcerated folks, black folks who are documented and undocumented, who are working class who are poor, who are unemployed, who are cis-gender and trans gender and gender non-conforming,” Monica Dennis, another organizer with Black Lives Matter, says.

Ultimately the movement promotes solidarity and racial justice in the face of state violence.

“Black Lives Matter is about peace. It’s about bringing people together. It’s about fighting for justice. It’s about solidarity and it’s about unity,” Workneh states.

Hear more about the Black Lives Matter in the movement above.

This video was produced by Jacques Morel, edited by Kohar Minassian and shot by Steve Gatti and Sam Wilkes.
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 3 • Views: 1,590 • Replies: 61
Topic Closed

 
tony5732
 
  -2  
Sun 14 Aug, 2016 01:01 pm
It's about that shooting white police officers, and rioting, and burning your neighbors house to the ground. It's about tipping cars, it's about pissing on the flag, or wiping your butt with it. It's about not apologizing for being a racist prick, because black people can't be racist.
tony5732
 
  -2  
Sun 14 Aug, 2016 01:05 pm
@tony5732,
The "myths" are absolutely true, and 100% proven. Again, and again, and again, and watch the news tomorrow, because it's about to go down again. Watch for BLM, than watch for white corpses.
tony5732
 
  -2  
Mon 15 Aug, 2016 10:41 am
@tony5732,
Thumbs down all you want, it happened. Future predicted.
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  3  
Fri 19 Aug, 2016 05:08 am
Black people wait twice as long to vote as white people, a new study finds
http://fusion.net/story/335786/long-lines-minority-voter-suppression/

The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies used data from the Cooperative Congressional Election Study to tabulate which races experience the average longest polling place wait-times. Unsurprisingly, black voters have double the average wait time of white ones.


https://i1.wp.com/fusion.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/screen-shot-2016-08-11-at-1-11-41-pm.png

The Center attributes these differences to two phenomena. The first is a lack of resources at polling places in minority neighborhoods. A Brennan Center study on the November 2012 election found that in three of the states with the longest wait times—Florida, South Carolina and Maryland—voters of color disproportionately had to go to polling places with fewer machines and/or fewer poll workers. There are also outdated voting machines that crash also lengthen lines. Errors in voting rolls — one in eight registration records is invalid or has serious errors — further compound these problems.

The second major factor is cuts to early voting programs, which people of color tend to take advantage of at greater rates than whites. In 2011, several states cut the number of early voting days, the Center report says. Florida, for example, reduced the number of early in-person voting days from 14 to 8. At the 2012 election, several Florida polling places with large populations of color experienced wait times of up to 7 hours.

Whatever their origin, the effects of longer poll lines are huge. The Center estimates that long lines deterred at least 730,000 Americans from voting in November 2012. That works out to about 14,000 voters deterred per state. Voting lines also cost Americans $544 million in lost productivity and wages, creating a kind of feedback loop for voters of color, who are often less able to sacrifice their wages therefore stay away from polling places.
giujohn
 
  -1  
Fri 19 Aug, 2016 05:19 am
@bobsal u1553115,
They should consider themselves lucky that they don't have to take a 5th grade social studies test in order to vote.
0 Replies
 
giujohn
 
  -2  
Fri 19 Aug, 2016 10:25 am
You bet your ass they are uneducated... And you can thank the Democratic party policies over the last 50 years... and your buddy Obama.
cicerone imposter
 
  4  
Fri 19 Aug, 2016 11:49 am
giujohn believes he's so smart, he can belittle others. He doesn't have a clue how ignorant he is. Everybody else sees him for who he is.
0 Replies
 
tony5732
 
  0  
Fri 19 Aug, 2016 11:14 pm
@giujohn,
Ugh. See now that's as bad as the BLM idiots without the criminal ****. No not all black people are uneducated. That actually made me cringe. That really is a straight racist assumption. That's the same as saying white cops murder black people, or white people are privileged. It's bullshit.
giujohn
 
  -2  
Sat 20 Aug, 2016 07:46 am
@tony5732,
I never said all... Bob did. And according to the statistics those who are educated are undereducated.

Sorry if it makes you cringe but facts are facts. And just because its stated by a white person doesn't make it any less true. Nobody wants to admit the failed policies of the democratic party when it comes to the urban black. And if blacks fail to understand that the Democratic Party has a vested interest in keeping them suppressed and not being able to realize this they keep voting them into office then yeah they're definitely uneducated. If they can't understand the simple premise that after 8 years of a black Democratic president they are worse off than they were before then yeah they're on educated.

"I am a Republican, a black, dyed in the wool Republican, and I never intend to belong to any other party than the party of freedom and progress."

Frederick Douglass

http://mobile.edweek.org/c.jsp?cid=25920011&item=http%3a%2f%2fapi.edweek.org%2fv1%2fblogs%2f69%2f&intc=mob-content

NEWS / District Dossier Blog
Graduation Rates Rise; Gap Between Black and White Males Grows, Report Says
By Denisa R. Superville Feb. 11, 2015
While the nation's graduation rate, including that of black and Latino males, has continued to grow, the gap between black males and their white peers has widened, according to a new report released Wednesday by the Schott Foundation for Public Education.
The report, "Black Lives Matter: The Schott 50 State Report on Public Education and Black Males," is the fifth such study the foundation has released on the state of black males in public education.
Since the last report in 2012, the gap between the four-year graduation rate for black males and white males widened from 19 points in the 2009-10 school year to 21 points in the 2012-13 year. For Latinos, the gap shrunk to 15 points from 20 during that same period, according to the report.
The national graduation rate for black males was 59 percent, 65 percent for Latinos, and 80 percent for white males for the 2012-13 school year, according to the report. Particularly striking was Detroit where only 20 percent of black males graduated on time in the 2011-12.
John H. Jackson, the foundation's president and CEO, said that the data indicate that federal, state, and district policies need to be examined to address the disparities in ways that will make a difference in the lives of black and Latino males.
"This report is about making a declarative statement that [Black lives] matter not only after they die, but they matter also when they are living," said Jackson in a conference call. "And since they matter, there are some things that the federal government, states and districts must...put in place— policies and practices—so that we can clearly make sure they have an opportunity to learn and an opportunity to succeed. And while we say black lives matter, we believe that all lives matter. The two statements are not mutually exclusive. But it is important to highlight particularly the black male population in this instance because, as our data indicate, in 35 of the 48 states as it relates to four-year graduation rates, black males are at the bottom."
The report takes a state-level view of the graduation rates and the gaps for all three groups, and a district-level view of the graduation rate for blacks and whites in the top 50 school districts where the black male enrollment exceeded 10,000.
The highest four-year graduation rates for Latino males were found in Alaska, Maine, West Virginia, New Jersey and Missouri. The states with the lowest Latino graduation rates included Colorado, Michigan, New Mexico, Washington state, the District of Columbia, Georgia, Utah, Connecticut, and Nevada.
Huge gaps of more than 25 percent between the graduation rates for Latino and white males were in Connecticut, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Utah and Wisconsin.
The states with the highest black male graduation rates were Maine, Idaho, Arizona, South Dakota and New Jersey, all with rates of more than 70 percent. In Maine it was 90 percent.
But with the exception of New Jersey, those states had very low enrollment of black males. New Jersey and Tennessee were the only two states with large black student populations where the graduation rates for black males were more than 70 percent. In New Jersey, the black male graduation rate in the 2012-13 school year was 76 percent, Latino 77 percent and white 92 percent. So while the graduation rate was high for blacks and Latino males in New Jersey, the gap between them and their white peers was 16 and 15 percentage points respectively. In Tennessee, the rates were 70 percent for black males, 74 percent for Latinos and 81 for white males.
The states with the lowest graduation rates for African-American males were Nevada, Nebraska, Mississippi, Indiana, and South Carolina, where rates for black males were 51 percent or less. Jackson said the low graduation rates in southern states were a cause of concern because the majority of black students were enrolled in southern schools.
Connecticut, New York, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Nebraska all had gaps of more than 25 percentage points between black and white male students.
Among the districts with black male student enrollment of at least 10,000, Detroit ranked the lowest, at number 50, in graduating its black male students. Twenty percent of its black males graduated in the 2011-12 school year. That number was even lower, 7 percent, for white male students.
In addition to Detroit, the bottom six included, New York City, whose rate was 28 percent; Chatham County, Ga., whose rate was 27 percent; Richmond County, Ga., at 27 percent; Philadelphia, at 24 percent; and Clark County, Nev., at 22 percent.
Johnson said that New York City's numbers were particularly notable since the city educates the largest number of black students in the country.
Devora Kaye, a spokeswoman for the city's department of education, provided alternative numbers, which showed an upward trajectory in the graduation rates for black and Latino students. In 2014, the city's schools had a 53 percent four-year graduation rate for its black males, up from 49 percent in 2012. Similarly, the white male graduation rate rose from 70.3 percent in 2013 to 73 percent in 2014. For Latino males, those numbers were 48.6 in 2012 and 52.2 in 2014.
The city for years has had major initiatives targeted at black and Latino students, among them the Expanded Success Initiative, which includes a focus on 40 schools with high black and Latino student populations. The mayor and chancellor also recently announced an expansion of the city's Young Men's Initiative—which started under Mayor Bloomberg and predates President Obama's "My Brother's Keeper" program—to hire more teachers of color and increase mentoring supports for young males of color.
(Jackson noted that the graduation rates for the Schott Foundation and some states and districts differed because some jurisdictions gave out multiple certificates, including a local diploma by the school district. In those cases, the foundation only factored in students who earned certificates that would allow them to enroll in the state's own university system. In New York State, for example, that would be the Regents Diploma.)
The report also lamented the difficulty in finding graduation data in some states. Jackson said that in some states it was easier to find incarceration data than graduation data.
It also looked at school climate issues that may affect graduation rates, including out-of-school suspensions rates, which have come under intense scrutiny in the last few years.
Fifteen percent of black male students received out-of-school suspensions, while the same was true for 7 percent of their Latino peers and 5 percent of white counterparts. The highest out-of-school suspension rates for black and white males were in Florida. The highest for Latino students was in Rhode Island. The lowest for Latino males was in New York state, with 3 percent.
Pedro A. Noguera, a professor of education and the executive director of the Metropolitan Center at New York University, said the data suggest the need for a deeper look beyond graduation rates and to other "opportunity to learn" factors, including out-of-school suspensions and special education placements.
"These increasingly become very important for understanding whether or not all children have the opportunity to learn and whether or not our schools are capable of meeting the needs of all kinds of students," he said. "This report, I think, serves as a barometer for where our country is at the current moment, and whether or not we are in fact making progress."
The report also hits on notes highlighted in other recent studies, such as the percentage of black and Latino males who are completing college. Their completion rates—16 and 12 percent, respectively—lag that of their white counterparts, 32 percent of whom hold a bachelor's degree or higher.
It also looked at the 8th grade proficiency levels in math and reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress, or NAEP. The gap in proficiency levels underscored the need for better quality for all students— blacks, Latinos and whites, according to the report.
A standout district appeared to be Montgomery County, in Maryland, just outside Washington. Among the districts covered in the report, Montgomery County had the highest black graduation rate, which was 74 percent for the 2011-12 cohort. (It was followed by Cumberland County, N.C.; Baltimore County, Md., and Guilford County, N.C). Montgomery County also had the highest percentage of black males enrolled in at least one AP course, 6 percent,—though that percentage still lagged that of white males, 16 percent of whom enrolled in at least one AP course.
Noguera said that it was important to go beyond the data to see what was working and what was not.
"It's particularly important that we not simply look at the data," Noguera said, "but then ask the next question, why is it that certain places like Montgomery County have made such progress and other places are lagging so far behind?"
The report also made some suggestions for reducing the disparities, including:
Meeting student-centered learning needs: Focusing on the individual needs of each student, instead of using a one-size-fits-all approach. The Schott Foundation uses the example of creating "personal opportunity plans" that would include academic, social and health supports for every student who is lagging one grade level or more.
Improving data reporting and collection: The foundation is asking for better data from districts and states that are disaggregated by race and gender. It also wants consistent and comparable data across states.
Improving school climate, including, for example, instituting a moratorium on out-of-school suspensions and utilizing restorative justice practices.
Philanthropic and community investments: The organization supports harnessing the resources of philanthropic groups and the private sector as well as the power of community to expand high-quality education. It suggests the expansion of efforts like those by JP Morgan Chase & Company, which provides mentors and learning opportunities to low-income high school graduates through the Fellowship Initiative; the National Opportunity to Learn Campaign, which promotes high-quality early education, highly-prepared effective teachers, and meaningful engagement with parents; and the Campaign for Black Achievement. (J.P. Morgan Chase is one of the funders for the report.)
Jackson said he hopes the report will prompt action.
"I hope number one, that the districts and states will begin to annually report the data, because I think that's the start of it—you measure what matters," Jackson said. "Annually, parents, students, policymakers and others should know how different groups of students are performing in the public education system. Secondly, once we are aware of what's happening or what's not happening, they would identify the supports that are necessary for each child to have an opportunity to learn. What are those academic, social-emotional, health supports...that create the type of healthy living and learning ecosystems where all students can learn? And then we need to be serious about aligning the resources to deliver those supports.
tony5732
 
  1  
Sat 20 Aug, 2016 10:50 am
@giujohn,
I saw what bobsal said, and I read you say damn straight. I just can't look at it like that. If we keep coupling statistics with race we can go back and forth all day about how blacks kill blacks and white cops kill more blacks and blah blah blah blah blah. The only way I can see actually looking at the situation fairly is to look at what each individual is actually doing. Did a cop shoot a suspect? Was the suspect armed? Was the suspect resisting arrest? The statistical philosophy is the problem in my opinion, because it groups everyone by color rather than what they actually do. You saying blacks are uneducated forgets people that ARE black and VERY educated. It's as ignorant assuming white cops are hunting black people.
bobsal u1553115
 
  3  
Sat 20 Aug, 2016 10:53 am
@giujohn,
Quote:
And you can thank the Democratic party policies over the last 50 years


Even though the GOP ran the White House, the Congress and the SCOTUS for the biggest part of that 50 years?????

You're as uneducated as anybody can be.
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  4  
Sat 20 Aug, 2016 11:00 am
@tony5732,
Quote:
people that ARE black and VERY educated.


The most educated segment of USpopulation right now are black women. They hold more collage degrees per capita than any other group.


http://shine.forharriet.com/2014/03/black-women-are-most-educated-group-in.html#axzz4HtOr9hV4

Black Women are the Most Educated Group in the United States
• March 01, 2014 • higher education
http://i789.photobucket.com/albums/yy172/thehlmn/Shine/blackcollege.jpg
For the first time in the history of data collection by the National Center of Education Statistics as reported by the US Census, Black women have surpassed every other group in this country based upon race and gender. What does that mean? For the first time in our history, African-American women have surpassed all groups in college entrance based upon race and gender. That's right. African American women enroll in college more than Asian men, white women - you name the group, either race or gender, African American women are number one.




While we couldn't be prouder of our sisters, we do hope that as we're climbing the ladder of educational attainment that we are doing so with an understanding of the trappings of student loan debt.

If you have any experience with debt, be sure to counsel a young woman you know about the costs and benefits. Take a look at this infographic from Mother Jones.

[imghttp://i789.photobucket.com/albums/yy172/thehlmn/Shine/blog_student_loan_debt.jpg][/img]

Read more: http://shine.forharriet.com/2014/03/black-women-are-most-educated-group-in.html#ixzz4HtPTQcYk
Follow us: @ForHarriet on Twitter | forharriet on Facebook


Read more: http://shine.forharriet.com/2014/03/black-women-are-most-educated-group-in.html#ixzz4HtOvcIDJ
Follow us: @ForHarriet on Twitter | forharriet on Facebook
0 Replies
 
giujohn
 
  -2  
Sat 20 Aug, 2016 11:38 am
@tony5732,
Uneducated doesn't always refer to the formal learning experience such as in the classroom.

I'm referring to the voting Bloc of black people who by an overwhelming percentage vote the Democratic Party into positions at the state and local government who are responsible for policies that directly affect the poor Urban black who lives in the ghetto.
In doing so over the last 50 years this strategy has done nothing to raise the poor black urbanite out of the Quagmire that is the ghetto now I call that a problem with ignorance... A problem I usually associate with the uneducated. But if you're uncomfortable with that word how about we just call it insane. You know the definition that says that you're insane if you keep doing the same thing over and over again expecting a different outcome each time?
glitterbag
 
  3  
Sat 20 Aug, 2016 01:30 pm
@giujohn,
That's an interesting view, in fact I see low income whites who are looking for a reason to feel better about themselves vote republican because they assume the Republican Party actually wants all those unwashed rubes to achieve success. Because if those lazy, low achievers become successful they might move into the nice republican waspish neighborhoods and no self respecting well off republican can abide that.
Giujohn might be the only one who can't detect low intelligence or 'uneducated' tip-offs whilst commiserating on the unfortunate state of white American males, what with those brassy feminists, minorities, and gay people all strutting around like they are equal to white males. But that's because he swims in the same dim-witted soup that they do.
bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Sat 20 Aug, 2016 03:24 pm
@glitterbag,
Quote:
But that's because he swims in the same dim-witted soup that they do.


What an apt turn of phrase!
0 Replies
 
tony5732
 
  -2  
Sat 20 Aug, 2016 04:04 pm
@giujohn,
But not all blacks are even liberals....
giujohn
 
  -3  
Sat 20 Aug, 2016 05:32 pm
@glitterbag,
The Republican party has always been about raising people out of poverty regardless of their color... Giving them a hand up not a hand out celebrating those hard-working individuals who are striving for the American dream and not those people who feel they are entitled to something sucking on the public teet of welfare generation after generation contributing nothing to their Community or to society.

Republican Party is about individual responsibility about lower taxes for everyone yes and that includes the rich too. The Republican party is not about redistributing wealth it's about realizing the American dream... The reason still to this day why immigrants from all over the world seek to come here.

Unfortunately we are starting to see a paradigm shift where the immigrants are not coming to achieve the American dream but to find that public teet offered by the Hillary's and other leftists and latch on to it... a quid pro quo for their vote.

Go ahead and embrace your leftist ideology and the Democratic Party in order for you to believe that you're doing something for the downtrodden because you're so compassionate... When you can show me what their policies have actually done to raise people out of poverty out of the ghettos then you may be able to speak with some Authority on this subject...

Until then you're just blowing hot air and the Democratic party's blowing Sunshine up the skirt of the black community and those who fall for it are short-sighted idiots.


cicerone imposter
 
  3  
Sat 20 Aug, 2016 07:31 pm
@tony5732,
Quote:
But not all blacks are even liberals....


What has that got to do with anything?
CLUE: Not all are Asians liberals. Even within our family, we have liberals and conservatives.
bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Sat 20 Aug, 2016 08:45 pm
@giujohn,
Quote:
Re: glitterbag (Post 6250932)
The Republican party has always been about raising people out of poverty regardless of their color blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah


Bullshit. Describe how they do that. Tell me about some of those Republican bootstrap programs. Name one. Just one.
 

Related Topics

Why Race? - Discussion by snood
Im white . - Discussion by shewolfnm
what are you? - Discussion by dyslexia
Be Black - Question by Victor Murphy
Fear of a Black President - Discussion by snood
Ten questions about race - Discussion by nimh
 
  1. Forums
  2. » What Black Lives Matter Is Really All About
Copyright © 2018 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 07/21/2018 at 09:24:47