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what mean this two sentence?

 
 
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2016 01:38 am
I want to know what is mean this two sentence and what is different between to those sentence?
The place where it all started.This is where it all began.
 
View best answer, chosen by mayaphenomenal
roger
 
  3  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2016 01:52 am
@mayaphenomenal,
Same meaning said in different ways. Maybe it's supposed to sound poetic.
mayaphenomenal
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2016 01:53 am
@roger,
thank you very much.
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
  Selected Answer
 
  2  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2016 11:12 am
@mayaphenomenal,
What is meant by the following two sentences, and what is the difference?

Quote:
The place where it all started.
The point at which we find a beginning


Quote:
This is where it all began.
This is that point

First is the name of a location, probably unknown the reader. Second points at a specific spot
mayaphenomenal
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2016 11:30 am
@dalehileman,
thanks
dalehileman
 
  2  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2016 12:40 pm
@mayaphenomenal,
Ur welcome May
0 Replies
 
Blickers
 
  2  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2016 01:15 pm
@mayaphenomenal,
I think you are referring to the transcript of a video in this post:
http://able2know.org/topic/332843-1#post-6225318

In this case, the speaker is talking about Detroit and the early auto industry as the place where modern industrial life began, replacing the largely agricultural life that came before. That's why she said "The place where it all began...... " . And since these androids were created in Detroit, and the androids were bringing in a new era, that's why Detroit is the place were the old industrial type life ended.
selectmytutor
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jul, 2016 03:04 am
@mayaphenomenal,
Same meaning of both sentences, just said in different ways.
Sage of Main Street
 
  3  
Reply Sat 16 Jul, 2016 07:21 am
@mayaphenomenal,
The title of your post should be, "What do these two sentences mean?" <i>These </i> is the plural of <i> this </i>. Beware of copying the stupid professional speakers, who will often say, "These kind of polls" instead of "this kind of poll." Also, "two sentence" is plural, so it should be "two sentences."

When asking a question, we have to use "do mean" or "does mean" instead of "What mean?" or "What means?"
mayaphenomenal
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2016 02:02 am
@roger,
thanks roger
0 Replies
 
mayaphenomenal
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2016 02:12 am
@dalehileman,
thank you so much
mayaphenomenal
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2016 02:16 am
@Blickers,
thanks
0 Replies
 
mayaphenomenal
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2016 02:29 am
@Sage of Main Street,
thanks.
0 Replies
 
mayaphenomenal
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2016 02:32 am
@selectmytutor,
Thakns.
0 Replies
 
mayaphenomenal
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2016 03:26 am
@Sage of Main Street,
and thanks for Correction my title.
mayaphenomenal
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2016 03:29 am
@Blickers,
thanks for your attention.
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2016 10:48 am
@mayaphenomenal,
Quote:
so much
May you're so welcome
0 Replies
 
Sage of Main Street
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Jul, 2016 03:34 pm
@mayaphenomenal,
"Thanks for correcting my title" or "Thanks for your correction of my title." A correcting and a correction mean the same thing but are used differently.
0 Replies
 
 

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