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How does the name "Angel" sound for a baby girl?

 
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 May, 2016 07:23 pm
@izzythepush,
Ah.
I looked up the name Jeremy Kyle on youtube, and went from there.

So Angel would have the kidna, ahem, trashy connotation there too.


As long as we're all here, how does everyone feel about the names Wendy, and Holly?

I personally really like those names, but I have been amazed at what some people say they think when they hear them.

roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 May, 2016 08:40 pm
@chai2,
Wendy for sure. Just be aware that by middle school she will be permanently nicknamed "Hot and Juicy".

Okay, so I've got a nasty mind.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 May, 2016 09:15 pm
@roger,
Trying to figure that one out.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 May, 2016 11:36 pm
@chai2,
It used to be the tag line for Wendy's Restaurants.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 May, 2016 11:38 pm
@roger,
http://www.defunkd.com/public/upload/images/product_images/big/dopedoll_14081396808459.jpg
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 May, 2016 11:45 pm
@chai2,
They're fine over here, we don't have Wendy's hamburgers. (I heard rumour there was one in London, but I've never seen it.)
0 Replies
 
FOUND SOUL
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 May, 2016 11:46 pm
@Angelgz2,
Why not spell it different, ie " Anjel" but pronounce it "Angel".

When I was a wee, little baby my mumma used to, no seriously. I had a lot of shirt from school, my name is Kelly, Kel for short.

"Smelly Kelly with the big fat belly, eating jelly". Kids are kids.

At some point if you call her Angel, she is going to introduce herself as "Ang" instead and people will always assume her name is therefore Angela.

Anj even just looking at it, has something unique about it as well.

Angel is cute to call any bubs, but think about it, as she gets older pretend it was your Mother's choice of name for you. Would you add an a? Change the name by depol, spell it differently, shorten it.

I think that you have a right to call your baby what ever you wish, I also think we as Adults have a responsibility to consider if there may be some after affect for that child as well.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 May, 2016 09:52 am
@FOUND SOUL,
Sorry FS, but I disagree on 2 counts.

Giving a name, especially an iffy name like Angel a yoonique spelling just compounds the problem.

Funny Clip

http://indavideo.hu/video/LA_Story_Meeting_SanDeE

While I agree the adult has a responsibility to consider the long term effect of a childs name, they don't have the right to give it whatever name they choose. That's been legally determined.


Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 May, 2016 10:06 am
@chai2,
It's the same in the UK.

I used to work above a Registrars Office and had many a chat with them about this topic over the ten years I was there.

They can refuse to register a name, and the parent then has the right of appeal to HM Government, but very rarely win.

I think the worst one was during the height of the IRA bombing campaign
in English cities, when a family with the surname of Kelly wished to give their newborn son the middle name of dynamite. True.

I feel great pity for all the kids named Jahondra, Kasheeka or other such crass sounding made up names, for even if they would want to be taken seriously when they get older, they will forever be fighting an uphill battle.

There, that's my rant for the day,

Your sincerely
The Right Honorable Peasmold Wildebeest Aswas the third.
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 May, 2016 01:53 pm
@chai2,
Quote:
when Olivier said his dtr was named Angele, I went to an quick online translator and typed in "angel" and got the translation of "L'ange" I thinking perhaps Angele is more like the English version of Angela

Yes, in French the boy's name would be Ange (used almost only in Corsica), and the corresponding girl's name is Angèle (in general use and equivalent to Angela). The variations Angeline and Angelique also exist.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 May, 2016 03:42 pm
@Lordyaswas,
Lordyaswas wrote:


I feel great pity for all the kids named Jahondra, Kasheeka or other such crass sounding made up names, for even if they would want to be taken seriously when they get older, they will forever be fighting an uphill battle.



I'm of 2 minds on this, depending on the name.

There are just some names, regardless of ethnicity, that just seem to say "don't take me seriously. I knew a white woman whose brith certificate read "Bunny" as her first name. I had a sister in law who from 2 minutes old was called Chickie. Bunny was an RN, Chickie a lawyer. I think because they were white, their uphill battle was not so steep. Unfortunate, but true.

I think today a baby girl could be named Condoleezza in America, and no one would blink an eye, if that baby was black. It's earned respect.

Some names like Keisha and LaRhonda are common enough now, although I don't understand the appeal. That's me. I'll tell you something though, I'd take those names over Ashleigh or Madyson any day of the week. Or their counterparts Ashley and Madison.

I just question whether the parents giving these childrens names on the premise it's a baby name, it shows how unique their child is, it's bucking the system, sound lovely to their ears. But if it's a name that is entirely made up, and no one else in the state even has that name, are you looking out for the childs potential future? It feels to me like naming the child is some sort of game.
Even looking on the internet, when you search for name meanings, you come up mostly with "baby" name sites. Isn't it funny how these babies someday turn into adults?

When I worked at a nursing home in the late 80's or early 90's, I realized that 70 years prior to that, tons of pretty little girls were given the lovely names of Gertrude, Bertha, Mrytle and Dorcas. Those were pretty names for pretty babies. So I know fashions change. We all know that. I also believe choosing a name for a person that is so unusual that people will have a hard time remembering it even after a few re-introductions isn't fair to that person.
0 Replies
 
FOUND SOUL
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 May, 2016 03:53 pm
@chai2,
What did Sarah Jessica Parker name her kids?

Angel will change her name as she gets older I'm betting on that.
roger
 
  2  
Reply Sun 8 May, 2016 03:59 pm
@FOUND SOUL,
I always thought Ichabod would be a good name - but only for a boy.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 May, 2016 04:10 pm
@FOUND SOUL,
FOUND SOUL wrote:

What did Sarah Jessica Parker name her kids?

Angel will change her name as she gets older I'm betting on that.


She named them Marion (girl), James Wilkie and Tabitha.

Re changing names, I just don't know. You grow up with a name, you don't like it, but it's your name.
Do you know a lot of people who have actually changed their first name?

Seems like the parents could be considerate and give the child a name they won't have to consider changing, because they decided to not take up prostitution or a cashier at a 7-11 as a profession.
chai2
 
  3  
Reply Sun 8 May, 2016 04:16 pm
@roger,
roger wrote:

I always thought Ichabod would be a good name - but only for a boy.


My last name is Crane.

I had the exterminator come by last week, and asked me if my husbands name was Ichabod.

I have a number of imaginary children, and 3 of them are named Ichabod, Frasier and Niles.

Oh. Also that lady from the shower scene in Pycho. Her name was Marion Crane in the movie.

I told Wally that should be his name, as I'm wife #5.
Sturgis
 
  3  
Reply Sun 8 May, 2016 05:50 pm
Give the child a name which means something to you and which you believe will be a good fit for the duration of their life, regardless of what like of work they go towards.

No matter what name they get, there are children who will find a way to taunt them, and as adults there'll be those who decide the name isn't fitting for an adult or is something which conveys a less than hob-knobby imagery.

My mother changed her name and people would ask why. She said the name was ugly and that she didn't like it. Her parents had named her Rose. The name she selected was a lesser known name and I don't know how well it served her.

To the name of Angel, the first one I knew of was born in the 1960s to an unwed mother and grew up into a strong wonderful woman.
0 Replies
 
Olivier5
 
  2  
Reply Mon 9 May, 2016 12:33 am
@chai2,
Quote:
Do you know a lot of people who have actually changed their first name?

Many do. My brother did - one day he told everybody that he would go with a new name. We can still call him his old name -- he's not against it -- but nobody does among us siblings, other than once in a while by mistake. Our parents never switched, though.

Many people don't like their name, even seemingly beautiful names.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 May, 2016 03:32 am
@chai2,
What about Crazy Legs?

http://www.tvshowsondvd.com/graphics/news3/CrazyLegsCrane_BLU.jpg
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 May, 2016 05:21 am
I would ask advice at a naming agency: only 28,000 Swiss Francs (25.360 € / £ 19.988 / $ 28.874) for the perfect personal baby name!
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 May, 2016 08:11 am
@Olivier5,
A friend/co-worker of mine detested her first name -- so much that she used her middle name rather than be called by her first name. It was very extreme to the point that no one knew her first name. On her business correspondence it would show her first initial and then her middle name written out.

She was French Canadian and she finally fessed up that her first name was too ethnic - not for a French person or a Canadian person, but for a Hispanic person. So she went for her more ordinary middle name.
 

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