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Was God creating Satan a good idea?

 
 
Fil Albuquerque
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Apr, 2016 05:49 pm
@Greatest I am,
Ask him and do wait for a proper answer no5 a sign.
0 Replies
 
mesquite
 
  2  
Reply Wed 13 Apr, 2016 03:58 pm
@ErikaJW,
ErikaJW wrote:
Please read Genesis 3:6. Here we learn that Eve CHOSE to disobey God and eat fruit from the tree that God had instructed them NOT to eat from, just like a young child, for example, may choose to disobey their parents and watch a very scary movie. The parents did their job and taught their child why they shouldn't watch the scary movie, but the child still CHOSE to do it anyway. It was the same with Adam and Eve, and the angel that later became Satan the Devil.

Please read Genesis 3:7, "And the eyes of them both were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together, and made themselves aprons." and Genesis 3:22, "And the LORD God said, Behold, the man is become as one of us, to know good and evil:
and now, lest he put forth his hand, and take also of the tree of life, and eat, and live for ever:"
. Here it becomes clear that the serpent was the truth teller
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Apr, 2016 06:26 am
@ErikaJW,
Isaiah 45-7.
Read it.
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Apr, 2016 06:28 am
@Kathy2,
God 'ALLOWED' it - Therefore is accountable for the consequences thereof.
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Apr, 2016 12:03 pm
@Greatest I am,
Greatest I am wrote:

Was God creating Satan a good idea?

Seems that you're implying that God has bad ideas.

Everyone's a critic.
0 Replies
 
neologist
 
  2  
Reply Sun 17 Apr, 2016 05:18 pm
@Greatest I am,
Greatest I am wrote:
Was God creating Satan a good idea?
rosborne979 wrote:
Do you personally actually believe in God and Satan?
Greatest I am wrote:
No. Hell no.

I just see a lot of problems with the myth.
But the 'myth' assumes free will. So God did not create Satan as evil. He (or it, if you prefer) chose to become evil.
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Apr, 2016 05:26 pm
@mesquite,
Half truths do not necessarily lead to truth.
TomTomBinks
 
  2  
Reply Sun 17 Apr, 2016 06:31 pm
@Setanta,
It's amazing to see how much time and energy is devoted to debating these kinds of questions.
Was trading his mother's cow for a handful of magic beans the smartest thing that Jack had ever done?
How wise was it for Red Riding Hood to go walking alone through a dark forest?
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Apr, 2016 08:22 pm
You know what would be bad? If Winnie the Pooh or Cookie Monster turned evil.
Glennn
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Apr, 2016 08:47 pm
@edgarblythe,
If they did turn evil, it would be more of a commentary on the destructive influence of honey and cookies than on the characters of Winnie and the Cookie Monster.
0 Replies
 
Leadfoot
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Apr, 2016 05:27 am
@TomTomBinks,
Quote:
It's amazing to see how much time and energy is devoted to debating these kinds of questions.
Yes it is. Why do you suppose it is?
rosborne979
 
  2  
Reply Mon 18 Apr, 2016 07:45 am
@Leadfoot,
Leadfoot wrote:
Yes it is. Why do you suppose it is?

Sadly, it's probably because a lot of people still believe it's true. A certain subset of people may see it as a moral parable based on fictional events and feel its worthy of discussion based on that alone, but I'm guessing they are a minority.
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Apr, 2016 02:42 pm
@neologist,
neologist wrote:

Greatest I am wrote:
Was God creating Satan a good idea?
rosborne979 wrote:
Do you personally actually believe in God and Satan?
Greatest I am wrote:
No. Hell no.

I just see a lot of problems with the myth.
But the 'myth' assumes free will. So God did not create Satan as evil. He (or it, if you prefer) chose to become evil.

If evil is the exercise of free will contrary to what God demands, then God is responsible for evil because he made the exercise of free will contrary to his demands possible. Without that possibility there would be no evil.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Apr, 2016 03:01 pm
If god wants hasenpheffer, god gets hasenpheffer.
0 Replies
 
Leadfoot
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Apr, 2016 04:21 pm
@rosborne979,
Quote:
If god wants hasenpheffer, god gets hasenpheffer
Ding, ding ding! Edgar gets it right!

Ros, how could anyone believe that so much ardent stewing is the result of an urge to debate some 'mortal parable' by a mythical guy who they've never met and may have never existed.

And don't pretend it's some small minority of poor souls who are prone to delusional flights of fancy. You, yourself, an intelligent well educated human cannot resist throwing yourself into the stew even though you know there is no hope of bringing anyone out of their self imposed ignorance.

Nope, even you cannot resist the inborn urge to throw yourself into it.

God wants it and he will not be denied.
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Apr, 2016 05:50 pm
@InfraBlue,
InfraBlue wrote:
. . . If evil is the exercise of free will contrary to what God demands, then God is responsible for evil because he made the exercise of free will contrary to his demands possible. Without that possibility there would be no evil.
Perhaps you are correct.
Would you consider a perfect conscience to be a restriction of free will?
Before Adam and Eve chose to have "knowledge of good and bad" they had a conscience that would not have allowed them to sin. So theft, assault, rape, or murder were impossible. No "free will" there.
If everyone in the world had a built in aversion to wrongdoing, would that be a good thing? And, could free will continue to exist within such a constraint?
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Apr, 2016 06:52 pm
@Leadfoot,
Leadfoot wrote:
Nope, even you cannot resist the inborn urge to throw yourself into it.

Actually it was your question that I found more interesting than the original, and that was all that drew me into it. I don't find debates on the meaning of Christian Mythology very interesting, but I do find human behavior interesting.
InfraBlue
 
  2  
Reply Mon 18 Apr, 2016 07:11 pm
@neologist,
neologist wrote:

Would you consider a perfect conscience to be a restriction of free will?


Like a lot of other things are restrictions to free will, a perfect conscience would be as well.

Quote:
Before Adam and Eve chose to have "knowledge of good and bad" they had a conscience that would not have allowed them to sin.


So, they had something that did not allow them to do something else, but they did that something else regardless?

This does not compute.

neologist wrote:
If everyone in the world had a built in aversion to wrongdoing, would that be a good thing?


By definition it would be a good thing.
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Apr, 2016 07:47 pm
@InfraBlue,
InfraBlue wrote:
So, they had something that did not allow them to do something else, but they did that something else regardless?

This does not compute.
They did have that one choice which was represented by their eating the fruit, thereby rejecting God's arrangement.
Glennn
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Apr, 2016 08:07 pm
@neologist,
Quote:
Before Adam and Eve chose to have "knowledge of good and bad" they had a conscience that would not have allowed them to sin.

Quote:
They did have that one choice which was represented by their eating the fruit, thereby rejecting God's arrangement.

Your first statement contradicts itself, as InfraBlue correctly pointed out.
Also, your second statement contradicts your first statement. By eating the fruit, Adam and Eve disobeyed the god, which means they sinned. And yet you say they possessed something that would not allow them to sin. InfraBlue was quite right to say that that does not compute.
 

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