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Brexit. Why do Brits want Out of the EU?

 
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  5  
Reply Fri 24 Jun, 2016 11:33 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Quote:
http://i66.tinypic.com/124bte9.jpg
Walter Hinteler
 
  4  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2016 12:02 am
@Walter Hinteler,
A petition calling for a second EU referendum has attracted more than half a million signatures despite unprecedented demand crashing the website.

And 100,000 people signed a petition calling on London Mayor Sadiq Khan to declare the capital independent from the UK and apply to join the European Union.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2016 12:27 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Cobblers.

It will never happen.


The scaremongering is pointless now, Walt. Brexit won. Get over it.
Walter Hinteler
 
  4  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2016 12:36 am
@Lordyaswas,
Lordyaswas wrote:

Cobblers.
It will never happen.
I don't think it will happen. But that had been said about the Leave campaign as well. And then Borris took the lead of it.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  4  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2016 12:38 am
@Lordyaswas,
Lordyaswas wrote:
The scaremongering is pointless now, Walt. Brexit won. Get over it.
I do know that Brexit won, I can read and never said anything different.

Get over it is easy said - the serious stuff just starts.
We might in two years, how it works out ... and in a couple more, how it succeeded.
Walter Hinteler
 
  4  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2016 02:18 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Quote:
Wanting your country back turns out to have been a zero-sum game. Waking up this morning, about 52% of voters felt they’d got it back, and about 48% felt they’d lost it. Yet perhaps in the long reckoning both sides will find they had, in the unspeakably tragic phrase of the hour, more in common than that which divides us. Maybe it’ll be like Clint Eastwood says at the end of The Outlaw Josey Wales, as he stares that thousand-yard stare: “I guess we all died a little in that damn war.”

For now, the victory belongs to Boris Johnson and Michael Gove, and to Nigel Farage. This is their triumph. Either celebrate it, or attempt not to choke on it. They have “taken back control”. They have “got their country back”.

What else did we get back? Definitely our financial arse, which was being handed to us way before the FTSE-100 even opened. David Cameron’s much-remarked-upon political luck has finally run out, and a campaign whose guiding spirit was a mendacious short-termism has produced the ultimate long-term result.

Whichever way you slice it, this feels like a significant moment for trust in politics. Before the result was even formally declared, Farage had rubbished the idea of the extra £350m for the NHS as a “mistake”, while the MEP Dan Hannan had talked down the idea of a reduction in immigration. What a magical mystery tour it will be for people, then, to discover what it was in fact they were actually voting for. And who will be blamed for things now the EU bogeyman is slain? The history of the continent offers a series of chilling answers to that inquiry.
[... ... ...]
Each of us can speak only as we find. For my own part – with a political wishlist that has always included progressivism, tolerance, universal human rights, openness, truthfulness and an outward-looking national state of mind – I can’t help feeling 2016’s wave of departures finally makes sense. All those cool people died just in time.
url=https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jun/24/leavers-take-control]Source[/url]
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2016 02:33 am
@Walter Hinteler,
This report by reuters sums up the situation on Saturday morning.

While waiting to get my rolls,I talked to an aquaintance.
He's British, lives here since decades, and works as a senior manager at Guy's & St Thomas (Germany)Ltd. (That a German health insurance company just and only for British civilians working at The British Forces here as well as for relatives of active servicemen not covered under the Nato statute. [The British Army doesn't have military hospitals here but uses German hospitals instead.)
Well, there had been plans to open this health insurer for all,since when the last garrison will be closed in 2019, there won't be many to get insured.

He didn't have an idea what will and could be done. But he applied for German citizenship yesterday.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2016 02:43 am
Britain has long-standing and reliable trade and financial arrangements with the United States. Britain has long-standing and reliable trade and financial arrangements with the other nations of the Commonwealth, and those arrangements date back to well before the EU was a gleam in its daddy's eye.

This, too, shall pass.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2016 02:45 am
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  4  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2016 03:10 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
Britain has long-standing and reliable trade and financial arrangements with the United States. Britain has long-standing and reliable trade and financial arrangements with the other nations of the Commonwealth, and those arrangements date back to well before the EU was a gleam in its daddy's eye.
Yes, but during the past 43 years ... all that was done under EU-regulations.
Setanta
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2016 05:08 am
@Walter Hinteler,
So? Really, Walter, you should get a hobby and stop obsessing over your defunct union.
Walter Hinteler
 
  4  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2016 05:40 am
@Setanta,
And how are you involved? I'm a citizen of the EU, and I really didn't notice the EU being defunct.
Do you think I should emmigrate?
I'd like to go Scotland after their new independence. But they want to become a EU-member country ...
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2016 05:48 am
@Walter Hinteler,
It seems to me that Britain would militarily support members of the EU if asked. They'd also be trading partners. They'd also be glad to continue traveling and welcoming EU travelers...

These things don't have to change.

It seems like the EU created and enforced too many strict edicts, and this is a push back. If they'd like to keep their remaining member nations happy, as Hollande suggested, they should adjust to complaints rather than lord over members tyrannically.
djjd62
 
  4  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2016 05:50 am
where are all those brits who voted to leave the EU going to go?
Lash
 
  0  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2016 05:53 am
@djjd62,
The same places they went before, I hope.
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2016 05:54 am
This is likely going to liven up football rivalries.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2016 05:58 am
@Lash,
Lash wrote:
It seems to me that Britain would militarily support members of the EU if asked. They'd also be trading partners. They'd also be glad to continue traveling and welcoming EU travelers...
The military support is done via NATO. (The UK didn't vote to leave NATO!!!)

Trading partners ...
The UK will have to renegotiate 80,000 pages of EU agreements, deciding those to be kept in UK law and those to jettison.
Greenland left the EU in 1985 after two years of negotiation. It has a population of 55,000, and only one product: fish.

Travellers: with ID-card as now? Passport? Visa? What about health insurance?
University fees? Working allowances?

But before all that could start, at firts the two-year-period of article 50 has to be done.
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  4  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2016 06:01 am
@Lash,
how can that be, Cameron caved to quickly, he should have adopted my idea for when Quebec wanted to separate from Canada, if the vote had gone in favour of separation, and i had been prime minister, i would have given the ones who voted to leave exactly what they wanted, i would have stripped them of their citizenship and given them 24 hours to get on a plane to anywhere but here

i understand there is room in Syria these days
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2016 06:19 am
While UK's EU commissioner Lord Hill resignsed following Brexit vote - what about the other British EU-employees? (There are only about 6% UK nationals on the staff of the various EU institutions, mainly due to language problems among domestic civil servants who could do the job.)
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2016 06:34 am
@djjd62,
It's going to be a challenge, but I'm going to try to figure out what side of this issue you are on... 😇
 

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