4
   

Reason or Emotion: Who's in Charge?

 
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Nov, 2015 06:04 am
@Tuna,
That's a pretty feeble basis upon which to claim i was motivated by my passions. Do you allege that saving money is an emotional exercise? The large washers save one time, too. Are you now going to allege that time-saving is an emotional exercise? I'm sure you can make a case for Hume's silliness if you make your definition of passion broad enough--which will result in it being so broad as to be meaningless.
Tuna
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Nov, 2015 06:09 am
@layman,
Quote:
Some people, like Richard Dawkins, for example, pretend that they want reason simply for reason's sake. Yeah, right, Dicky-boy.
A lot of people do what I think of as argument from psychoanalysis. Like: Republicans say that because (insert some character flaw). It's incredibly condescending.

So I don't know what to do about the fact that Dawkins (or anyone who puts a LOT of energy into attacking superstition) seems to beg for psychoanalysis.

You see? You can also find an emotional state that is conflicted. I think reason in these cases is the way out. Maybe.

Quote:
Nietzche hated platonic thought, but he admired Socrates, the character. Why? Because Socrates created a new form of "game." A new sport, a new CONTEST. It was the game of reasoning, and using your skills to defeat your opponent.
But Socrates wasn't about winning through sophistry. The myth is that he went to the Oracle and was told he was the wisest man in Athens. He thought "How could that be? I don't know anything?" He concluded that this must be why he was wisest: because he knew he didn't know anything. Subsequently he went around showing everybody else that all their knowledge tends to fall apart on analysis.
layman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Nov, 2015 06:12 am
@Tuna,
Quote:
He concluded that this must be why he was wisest: because he knew he didn't know anything.


Cancha see, Tuna? That was his game, and he had the best. That boy was a playa, sho nuff.

Quote:
Subsequently he went around showing everybody else that all their knowledge tends to fall apart on analysis.


Exactly. He kicked their sorry asses.
Tuna
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Nov, 2015 06:16 am
@Setanta,
Quote:
Do you allege that saving money is an emotional exercise?

It's that if money and time are significant to you, that's passion at work, not reason.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Nov, 2015 06:18 am
@Tuna,
Ah yes . . . some honesty from you . . . you're so devoted to your argument that you'll define passion broadly enough to have no meaning. See ya.
Tuna
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Nov, 2015 06:18 am
@layman,
Quote:
Exactly. He kicked their sorry asses.

Up until they sentenced him to death.
Tuna
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Nov, 2015 06:19 am
@Setanta,
Goodbye.
0 Replies
 
layman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Nov, 2015 06:20 am
@layman,
Quote:
Cancha see, Tuna? That was his game, and he had the best. That boy was a playa, sho nuff.


Plato knew that. Now and again, in his dialogues, some opponent would get furious with the Soc, and shout: "Damn you, Socrates! You're justa damn coward. You won't ever take a stand, you never assert a position. You just ask questions, fool!

He dunked on they ass, when he suckered them into tryin to go for a steal.
0 Replies
 
layman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Nov, 2015 06:25 am
@Setanta,
Quote:
That's a pretty feeble basis upon which to claim i was motivated by my passions. Do you allege that saving money is an emotional exercise?...See ya.


A somewhat overwrought (passionate, ya might say) response to being called on your greed, aint it?
0 Replies
 
layman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Nov, 2015 06:31 am
@Tuna,
Quote:
Up until they sentenced him to death


According to Fred, he was winning even then. He gave them the business at his "trial" to insure that they would put him to death because he had wearied of the game. The custom and expectation was that he would show remorse and ask for mercy. Instead, for once, he went all cocky on they ass, and insulted them

His last words were: "I owe (the god of medicine, whatever his name was) a cock (as payment)." He had been cured of his "sickness" (a boring life).
Tuna
 
  0  
Reply Thu 26 Nov, 2015 09:51 pm
@layman,
Quote:
His last words were: "I owe (the god of medicine, whatever his name was) a cock (as payment)." He had been cured of his "sickness" (a boring life).

He was in his 70's. I doubt he chose death from boredom. It was probably because he was afflicted by morons like ehBeth.
layman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Nov, 2015 09:59 pm
@Tuna,
Quote:
He was in his 70's. I doubt he chose death from boredom. It was probably because he was afflicted by morons like ehBeth.


I must have missed your "run-in" with her. I'd be interested in seeing it. Got a link?
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Nov, 2015 10:08 pm
I was reason ages 7-24, emotion the rest. The way I am right now is reason on petty matters or things that I dont care about, emotion on the things that I care about. However, I always do care about what the nature of reality is, so my brain is always active on that. But having a job does not mean that job is boss.
Tuna
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Nov, 2015 07:07 am
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
I was reason ages 7-24, emotion the rest. The way I am right now is reason on petty matters or things that I dont care about, emotion on the things that I care about. However, I always do care about what the nature of reality is, so my brain is always active on that. But having a job does not mean that job is boss.

It sounds like you're saying that you're approach to the nature of reality is mostly emotional. Is that true?
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Nov, 2015 08:29 am
@Tuna,
Quote:
It sounds like you're saying that you're approach to the nature of reality is mostly emotional. Is that true?


Kinda. I am Zen so my window onto the nature of the universe is intuitive, which means that the gut runs the show and not the head except on trivial matters.
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Nov, 2015 08:34 am
i'm passionately and emotionally invested in my unreasonableness
0 Replies
 
Tuna
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Nov, 2015 12:07 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
Kinda. I am Zen so my window onto the nature of the universe is intuitive, which means that the gut runs the show and not the head except on trivial matters.

I like Zen. Wabi-sabi. Recycling old ceramic tiles. Samurai warriors learning to lose all fear of death.

What in life is really trivial though?


0 Replies
 
 

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