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is there a neutral point in an electromagnetic wave

 
 
Reply Sun 28 Dec, 2014 05:05 am
Is there a neutral point in an electromagnetic wave which could be considered neutral in terms of time space .
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Type: Question • Score: 4 • Views: 1,694 • Replies: 21
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contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Dec, 2014 05:54 am
Your question has no meaning. Please make it clearer, using mathematics ideally.

martinies
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 28 Dec, 2014 06:08 am
@contrex,
Well electromagnetic suggests two conditions for the samething or a flux in a field between electro action and magnetic action through timespace. Is there then a neutral point of no action in the flux between the two different conditions. Where we could say this partical is not in action at this point. A bit like the on and of on a computer say.
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Sun 28 Dec, 2014 06:11 am
Have you ever read a physics text book?
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Dec, 2014 06:15 am
@martinies,
martinies wrote:
electromagnetic suggests two conditions for the samething or a flux in a field between electro action and magnetic action through timespace.

It does not suggest that to me.
martinies
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 28 Dec, 2014 06:21 am
@contrex,
Just trying to think how a photon actualises its self in timespace to be going somewhere as in a location.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Sun 28 Dec, 2014 06:24 am
1. Have you ever read a physics text book?

2. You should read the excellent series of lectures by Richard Feynman

here:

http://www.feynmanlectures.caltech.edu/

3. Try asking some of your questions on Physics Stack Exchange:

http://physics.stackexchange.com/

The replies and moderation you get may help you to formulate questions in a meaningful way.

martinies
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 28 Dec, 2014 06:52 am
@contrex,
Well contrex ive had a look thanks but thats to complicated. What im after here is a simple idea of how a photon moves its self through space. Blimey
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Sun 28 Dec, 2014 06:59 am
@martinies,
martinies wrote:

Well contrex ive had a look thanks but thats to complicated. What im after here is a simple idea of how a photon moves its self through space. Blimey

What's with the "Blimey"? If you want to understand physics, read some introductory physics material. The Feynman lectures are ideal.
martinies
 
  0  
Reply Sun 28 Dec, 2014 07:13 am
@contrex,
Is it the alternating effect of magnetism and electricity that propergates the photon through space. Much as a catapillar moves its self along a leaf say.ha
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Sun 28 Dec, 2014 07:13 am
It does not make sense to ask "how" photons move.They are not little balls. Electromagnetic radiation travels at the speed of light by definition (see the Clerk Maxwell equations.)
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Sun 28 Dec, 2014 07:15 am
@martinies,
martinies wrote:

Is it the alternating effect of magnetism and electricity that propergates the photon through space. Much as a catapillar moves its self along a leaf say.ha

You have just shown that you do not understand what electromagnetic radiation is. READ SOME PHYSICS TEXTS.
0 Replies
 
Brandon9000
 
  2  
Reply Sun 28 Dec, 2014 08:59 am
@martinies,
martinies wrote:

Is it the alternating effect of magnetism and electricity that propergates the photon through space. Much as a catapillar moves its self along a leaf say.ha

A changing electric field gives rise to a changing magnetic field which gives rise to a changing electric field, etc. That's how any electromagnetic wave propagates through space. James Clerk Maxwell figured it out.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Dec, 2014 09:44 am
@martinies,
The question about one wave has no meaning. But there is something very interesting if you have two waves interfering with each other. They cancel each other out making a "neutral space" (if you would call it that).

This is a pretty easy experiment to do, I have done it with high school students. This picture is what happens when you shine light through two slits... the dark lines between the bright lines are where two wave cancel each other out.

http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lowj34vxY71qk5j50.jpg

There are a lot of interesting things to learn if you decide to crack open a Physics textbook.
martinies
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Dec, 2014 09:55 am
@Brandon9000,
Well thanks there brandon thats what I was after it takes a lot of reading physics to know that. It took me 4hours on here but whats time. Physics without brain aches good phisics.ha
0 Replies
 
martinies
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Dec, 2014 10:10 am
@maxdancona,
Thanks there max thats exact what I was looking for . Neutrality in light. Thanks
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Dec, 2014 12:10 pm
@martinies,
Marty, it's a good Q of especial interest to your Average Ignoramus (me). I'm wondering for instance whether the electrical component might be out of phase with the magnetic so that there's no point of zero or neutral effect

Edited to remark oops, you seem to have addressed this very issue in #……085

Quote:
Just trying to think how a photon actualises its self in timespace to be going somewhere as in a location
Edited once again to agree, here's a q that has also pestered yours truly in subliminal sort of way

Us ignoramuses Marty must stick together
martinies
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Dec, 2014 05:21 am
@dalehileman,
Light is a representation of spacetime.light being as it is pure speed with no mass. Pure speed light is pure timespace representation.
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Dec, 2014 12:31 pm
@martinies,
Quote:
What im after here is a simple idea of how a photon moves its self through space. Blimey
I too Marety. The idea that a photon is a little ball somehow traveling at velocity c is troubling

http://able2know.org/topic/263375-1
martinies
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Dec, 2014 01:45 pm
@dalehileman,
Yeah know what you mean. Aparently it the photon flicks its self through timespace . But in side the flick is a neutral. It has to deal with the neutral every flick.
0 Replies
 
 

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