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how to overcome nihilism ?

 
 
Reply Fri 5 Sep, 2014 06:30 am
I'm a fan of Nietzsche. I really like him, but I’m upset because he didn’t provide a clear argument against nihilism.

From reading his stuff and watching online lectures, I realise the best argument against nihilism is to idealise and work towards developing a temporal true world (e.g. utopian society, planetary civilisation). This is the only option for anyone with a materialist / physicalist outlook on life and existence (i’m a physicalist). Becoming the uberman (Übermensch) can really help with creating a temporal true world (e.g. utopian society, planetary civilisation). When someone is self-actualised (become the uberman), s/he is more productive, capable, strong and consequently contribute more to the human race.

Anyway my confusion is about nihilism. How can someone with a physicalist on life overcome nihilism ?
I don’t feel optimistic about creating a temporal true world (e.g. utopian society, planetary civilisation). Even if we create a temporal true world, I don’t think it will exist forever. The human race cannot outlive the universe’s existence. Even if we do, whats the point ? Being immortal and existing forever (infinitely) and traveling to multiple universes also sounds good, but then what ?

I’m confused and don't see why nihilism is such a bad philosophy to live by.

Thank you.
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Type: Question • Score: 4 • Views: 4,200 • Replies: 24
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Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Fri 5 Sep, 2014 06:37 am
@internetking001,
If you think out the logical progression of a nihilistic philosophy in a practical application... where does the constructive or productive drive lead? Where does an individual end up? Where and what's the goal? What would be the motivation to succeed and reach some sort of goal? How does society advance if a large group of nihilists are running things?

What does this mean?
Quote:
The human race cannot outlive the universe’s existence.

That's a question that his no relevance to any reality. Why would a human want to live in a non-existent universe? Humans have a physicality that requires a physical universe.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Fri 5 Sep, 2014 07:02 am
@internetking001,
Quote:
how to overcome nihilism ?

Give the nihilist a 50 inch ultraHD tv, an XBox One, and a couple hundred dollars to buy games. She or he will soon forget to rail at the existential horrors provided by the Universe.
0 Replies
 
JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Sep, 2014 08:04 pm
@internetking001,
As I understand Nietzsche nihilism is a means for the elimination of absolutistic notions and values, particularly those of theistic origin. The value of nihilism is that it clears the way for the development (transvaluation) of new more constructive values and notions of reality. Eventually they may take on too rigid a place in human life and have to be replaced with new notions and values, requiring a temporary phase of nihilistic openness or freedom. Nihilism should be temporary and relativistic not absolutistic and doctrinal. Nihilism in this sense if not destructive; it is an open phase of progressive evolution.
One Eyed Mind
 
  -2  
Reply Fri 5 Sep, 2014 08:17 pm
I am a juxtaposition between holism and nihilism. Ask me any question, friend. I'll get you through the void; I know how to beat it at its staring contest.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Sep, 2014 04:19 am
@One Eyed Mind,
Like this?

0 Replies
 
room109
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 6 Sep, 2014 11:09 am
@internetking001,
you misunderstand
0 Replies
 
jeffers
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Sep, 2014 07:25 pm
@internetking001,
I feel that nihilism is a dangerous philosophy to live by. It is irrefutable as a philosophy, since you cannot disprove that nothing exists, but it is by far one of the most depressing and terrifying philosophies I've considered. It leaves no space for a life after death, it spits in the face of faith. Furthermore, it allows for no universal morals, actually encourages a selfish and egotistical lifestyle.
One Eyed Mind
 
  0  
Reply Mon 8 Sep, 2014 07:30 pm
@jeffers,
No it's not. I reached holism from the depths of this abyss. Holism can only be obtained once you master chaos, it cannot be obtained to a full-circle until you create the hole, you dig? Life is like space - first it makes no sense - then draws dimension - like this . . > __ Then if you draw a line diagonally inwards from each end of this line, you get a triangle. Then if you create an hourglass with two triangles, sticking two more pieces on each side, you create an imaginary square, and that's how the Universe was formed. Triangles and hourglasses. If you look at the birth of a cell and the birth of a galaxy, you'll see it is born like this {}{} symbol.

So yes, if you live in the middle, everything looks small, but when you are not afraid to watch things get big, by crossing the bridge to either side of the hourglass, time will disappear along with you, so you can witness true experience.

Nihilism is just people not understand life's illusion. They slide down their silver helix, off the ramp, into the oblivion - respawning back at the top. They don't know why nothing has changed, and that's because they have too much sliding down the helix. To master chaos, one has to control the climax right at the end, which should give you this feeling of life surging through your body - live life with that kept, unless you want to let it go, that's up to you. But heed my word, life is all about controlling its climaxes. When you let it go, life resets - don't let it reset.
jeffers
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Sep, 2014 07:34 pm
@One Eyed Mind,
Nihilism covers the infinity-- the universe is finite, and even in a multiverse, there are finite permutations. Imagine every second of your life in replay, forever. Or simply nothing. That's what nihilism means to me.
One Eyed Mind
 
  0  
Reply Mon 8 Sep, 2014 07:38 pm
@jeffers,
Nihilism is the eternal eye, jeffers. It is the very reason why we are free, when we do not commit ourselves to any object/concept. Every painting, every design, every shape, every thing, is fundamentally nothing beneath the surface. It's an illusion of object/concept. That is why a blank slate of paper is opened to artists - and a used slate of paper is opened to critics. That's why you can create anything on a blank slate, but you cannot, say, edit the already done pictures. The same applies to our lives and our experiences. Deep down we have the eternal eye spitting our information infinitely, but everything it spits out lives a finite state, even though the eternal eye is eternal. I wrote a poem to express this: Things come; Things go; Things vacuum; Things blow.

Holism is all of which can be. As I like to tell people, "be as whole as a hole can be".
jeffers
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Sep, 2014 07:47 pm
@One Eyed Mind,
The problem I find with that is that I do not know about the eye. For all we know, we ARE just a collection of atoms that believe they have freewill. When we die, we lose consciousness, freedom and thought. Whatever thoughts we had disappear, forever. The idea that the universe is a loop is no more comforting to me, since a looped existence is as meaningless as a finite one.
I suppose that nihilism takes the meaning out of my life, and that's why I hate it. However, I cannot disprove it, so it is a terrifying and unavoidable idea to me.
One Eyed Mind
 
  0  
Reply Mon 8 Sep, 2014 07:57 pm
@jeffers,
Oh, I know we are atoms role-playing humans, definitely. We break away like gas molecules. We behave like subatomic particles. Both we and the particles can be "tickled" and "irritated", which is what we really are, vibrations and frequencies wrapped inside atomic life and animation.

When we die, these atoms no longer have a body, which no longer has tools of expression. The human body is simply a costume the atoms wear. If I was an artist, I would draw a picture of a human figure with atoms controlling everything inside, to express what really drives us internally and intrinsically.

Nihilism leads to Holism. There's a juxtaposition between the two. Do not fear the abyss, it's just the zero point - it's where all things return and all things are created. When you stare into its eyes and feel the emptyness inside you, is when you know life and how to control it once and for all.

jeffers
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2014 02:07 pm
@One Eyed Mind,
It comes down to: should we fear the unknown? How can we over come that fear?
One Eyed Mind
 
  0  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2014 03:35 pm
@jeffers,
It all comes down to: should we see our "self", or should we let our "self" go and become one with the Universe, as to pop the "air bubble" we're in, so to speak, which is fundamentally surrounded by the cosmic sea?
JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Sep, 2014 11:43 pm
@One Eyed Mind,
I'd let my self go if it were not already (primordially) gone. And I would try to be one with the universe if it were separate from "me."
One Eyed Mind
 
  0  
Reply Fri 12 Sep, 2014 01:55 am
@JLNobody,
The way you wrote that is telling me you have not properly understood how to let go of "self". When I speak of it, I speak in question - you're speaking of it in a sarcastic manner, which is the lowest form of wit and as you speak, you speak with certainty. It does not take certainty to remove identity, friend.
0 Replies
 
VictoriaRichards
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Oct, 2014 08:54 pm
@JLNobody,
I agree with this reading of Nietzsche. As everything with Nietzsche, it all comes and goes, it's all wrapped up in 'becoming', in eternal flux. We constantly need destruction and generation.
0 Replies
 
JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Oct, 2014 07:59 pm
@One Eyed Mind,
I'm not disagreeing with you; let me attempt some clarification: We should see into the nature of our "self" to realize what mystics mean when they distinguish between a false self (little mind in zen) and True Self (Big Mind in zen). Regarding the ego or false self, when we realize that we cannot find it (as acknowledged also by David Hume) we automatically "let it go". But mystics also say that when we realize the illusory nature of the egoself we realize our primordial/ inherent unity with Brahma, God, Reality, Dharma etc. We see that from the beginning we were never separate little egos in need of some grand unification.
One Eyed Mind
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Oct, 2014 08:00 pm
To overcome nihilism is to see death of an old beginning as a new beginning, not death; not an end.
0 Replies
 
 

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