Walter Hinteler
 
  5  
Reply Mon 10 Nov, 2014 03:28 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
A very interesting source for getting an idea about what was going in the USA is the Library of Congress' Chronicling America : 100 Years Ago Today

While most (digitalised) papers have something like "German Navy's Sea Terror 'Emden' Destroyed by Australia" on their frontpages, the German newspaper from Cincinnati* focuses on Germany's success in Russia ...

http://i58.tinypic.com/2r4hhyb.jpg

The Day Book, Chicago**, informed only on page 11 (of 32) about the war, but with a story about German POW's in England

http://i58.tinypic.com/qy5m6v.jpg

*The Tägliches Cincinnatier Volksblatt was a newspaper published in German from May 1836 until December 1919 for German speaking immigrants of Cincinnati. The "people's daily news" was published six days a week, and contained local and national news, as well as news from Europe. The paper contained many advertisements of local merchants and announcements that were of interest to the local German community.

**The Day Book was published in Chicago between 1911 and 1917. Conceived by newspaper mogul Edward Willis Scripps as an experiment in advertisement-free newspaper publishing, the Chicago Day Book was published for a working-class readership Monday through Saturday from September 28, 1911 to July 6, 1917. Scripps chose Chicago, with its large working-class population, as the venue for the first of what he hoped would become a chain of ad-free newspapers. Free from commercial influence, the Day Book would report on issues of concern to what Scripps called the “95 percent” of the population.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Mon 10 Nov, 2014 03:38 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

Walter Hinteler wrote:
It weren't "young German voluteers" either, but unqualified older volunteers of the 44th, 45th, and 46th Reserve Infantry Division.
My maternal grandfather somehow had avoided to conscripted during before the war. (He was a "National Liberal").

In 1914, aged 25, after a short medic training, he became medic in the 4th company of a reserve battalion within in the 98th Infantry Regiment.

I only now noticed that I didn't post the important part:
grandfather met in Metz (his unit was called 98th Metz Infantry Regiment) many of the wounded in that above mentioned battle. So he knew what really had happened. That not only made him an even stronger republican but an anti-Nazi later, too. (It didn't avoid that he got gased three times in 1916, 1917, 1918 - every time returning to Verdun after staying in hospital.)
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Nov, 2014 08:17 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
wow
0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Nov, 2014 10:44 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
All very good stuff, Walter.
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Nov, 2014 08:25 am
For today, Armistice Day......


panzade
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Nov, 2014 09:02 am
@Lordyaswas,
...a whole generation gone
Walter Hinteler
 
  4  
Reply Tue 11 Nov, 2014 09:05 am
100 years ago, on this day was the Battle of Nonnebosschen. - This battle was the last action of the first Battle of Ypres.

wikipedia wrote:
On the morning of 11 November the Prussian Guard attacked British troops along the Menin Road. Thirteen battalions of them came on, but only in three places did the Prussian Guard break through. On the following morning FitzClarence counter-attacked. The General himself decided to show his old regiment the way, and paid for the decision with his life. FitzClarence fell dead, and neither FitzClarence himself, nor Sir John French knew how well he had served his country at Gheluvelt.

In his Despatch of 20 November 1914, Sir John French said: "Another officer whose name was particularly mentioned to me was Brigadier-General FitzClarence, VC, commanding the 1st Guards' Brigade. He was unfortunately killed in the night attack of the 11th November. His loss will be severely felt".

He was killed in action, aged 49, at Polygon Wood, Zonnebeke, Belgium, on 12 November 1914 whilst commanding the 1st Guards Brigade.
He is the highest-ranking officer inscribed on the Menin Gate Memorial in Ypres, commemorating those with no known grave.
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  3  
Reply Tue 11 Nov, 2014 09:26 am
Great stuff, Walter. Thanks!
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  3  
Reply Tue 11 Nov, 2014 10:09 am
@panzade,
panzade wrote:
...a whole generation gone


In the preface to one edition of The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tokien stated that only he and four other men from his "year" at Oxford had survived the war.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b4/Tolkien_1916.jpg
Walter Hinteler
 
  5  
Reply Tue 11 Nov, 2014 12:37 pm
@Setanta,
That gave me the idea to look for a photo of of my parental great uncle (grandfathers younger brother)

He got his PhD in physics (actually, he was studying chemistry) in 1914 - you can get it as a University of Michigan reprint ...

http://i58.tinypic.com/2re2onr.jpg

... and developed together with a co-student some formulas about the adsorption of vapour ...

http://i61.tinypic.com/2wrp649.jpg

... but had go in the battles before he could do more researches

http://i57.tinypic.com/35ddaow.jpg


He soon got badly wounded and gased, didn't recover and died shorly after the end of the war.

The Firts World War ended on this very day 96 years ago with the the Armistice of Compiègne.
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Tue 11 Nov, 2014 01:58 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:
The First World War ended on this very day 96 years ago with the the Armistice of Compiègne.
The names of the half a million soldiers who died in northern France in the 1914-18 war – former comrades and former enemies – are engraved on a spectacular new memorial opened by President François Hollande near Arras tosay.

The soaring concrete ring at Notre Dame de Lorette is the first memorial to list alphabetically all the victims of a conflict without distinction of rank or nation. Of the 579,606 names of soldiers killed in northern France during the First World War, more than half – 294,000 – are from Britain or the Commonwealth. President Hollande paused beside the names of three soldiers – one French, one German, one British. His British choice was Wilfred Owen, the poet, who was killed at the Sambre canal on 4 November 1918.

http://i60.tinypic.com/24xe9he.jpghttp://i60.tinypic.com/2vis5eo.jpg

http://i62.tinypic.com/2euqxc0.jpghttp://i60.tinypic.com/28gvwk2.jpg
Source of photos: La Voix du Nord
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Wed 12 Nov, 2014 07:48 am
@Walter Hinteler,
The evening edition of the Berliner Tageblatt reports the "usual" 'success' stories of the German forces ...

http://i61.tinypic.com/2ducggg.jpghttp://i59.tinypic.com/22bbkk.jpg

... but reports as well about the advance of Turkish troops towards Egypt, and discusses, how England might react military

Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Wed 12 Nov, 2014 07:48 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Quote:
At the beginning of November 1914, the Ottoman Empire, the world's greatest independent Islamic power, abandoned its ambivalent neutrality towards the warring parties, and became a belligerent in the conflict, with the sultan declaring a military jihad (holy war) against France, Russia and Great Britain.

The Ottoman Empire had recently been humiliated by setbacks in Libya and the Balkans. Participation in what had begun as a European war might seem to outside observers, therefore, to have been suicidal, but key elements in the government, impressed by German industrial and military power and motivated by dreams of imperial glory, greeted the expanding war as an opportunity to regain lost territories and incorporate new lands and nationalities into the empire.

The Ottoman/Turkish army (some 600,000 troops divided into 38 divisions) was of an unknown quality. But with Germany as an ally, the Ottoman Empire represented a serious threat to the British Empire, so in a pre-emptive strike, London immediately landed an Anglo-Indian force at Basra, near the estuary of the Euphrates and Tigris rivers. This was done to protect the Anglo-Persian oil pipeline, which was vital to the British navy, and to show the Union Jack in this strategically important area in the Persian Gulf.
Source

More happened there later ...
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  4  
Reply Thu 13 Nov, 2014 10:09 am
11 NOVEMBER 1914

EASTERN FRONT: After intercepting Russian plans for an invasion of Silesia, Hindenburg and Ludendorff plan a strike against the enemy right flank as the Russians advance westward. General August von Mackensen, newly appointed commander of the German 9th Army, hits the Russian 1st Army, still led by the demonstrably incapable Paul von Rennenkampf, north of the Vistula River near the Polish city of Łódź. As had happened at Tannenberg, the German advance threatens to encircle the disorganized Russians, but, on November 16, a quick counter thrust by the Russian 5th Army, brought up from the south, and a renewed attack by the 1st Army, soon turned the tables on the Germans and put Mackensen in danger of encirclement. The German commander managed to extricate his army from its precarious situation, bringing with him 136,000 Russian prisoners.



The second attempt by the Germans to inflict a crushing blow against the Russians in Poland had failed, but only through some uncharacteristically fast action by the Russian high command. August von Mackensen distinguished himself in this campaign, as he would through the remainder of the war as one of Germany's best army commanders.

http://static1.akpool.de/images/cards/98/988439.jpg
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  4  
Reply Thu 13 Nov, 2014 02:35 pm
On November 13, 1914, the Ottoman Empire declared the jihad against the French and British.
The frontpage of the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung was more or less only about that

http://i57.tinypic.com/2n7i6fc.jpg

The proclamation was part of a wider German scheme to provoke rebellions in French and British colonies.

An interesting paper "Jihad made in Germany. German propaganda in East Africa during the First World War, 1914-18" >here<
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Nov, 2014 03:22 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Fascinating...so germane to today.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 14 Nov, 2014 04:16 am
@panzade,
During a Commons sitting on 11 November 1914, the Prime Minister Asquith was asked, why the French published more about the war and their success than the British did:
Quote:
No; I think they have published a great deal less than we have. But I do not want to go into that. It is a perfectly sound principle that we must have regard to what they think are their interests, just as much as to what we think are ours. We must go side by side with them, and although I quite agree that, from the point of view of recruiting, in which, of course, I have special and direct interest, it is very desirable indeed that we should have 30 those full, I was almost going to say full-blooded descriptions, with which the old special correspondents used to furnish us in wars gone by—special adventures and heroic achievements of this or that regiment in this or that stricken field. But when you are dealing with a war which extends over a front of a hundred, or even two hundred miles, with a multiplication of scientific developments, the telephone, the telegraph, and other means of communication, and everything you publish becomes the common property of the world, and therefore the property of your enemy, the obligations of reticence are far greater than they ever were before, and the field for this descriptive writing, admirable in its way, and a great incentive and a stimulus to patriotic feeling, is a field which is necessarily more curtailed than ever it was before. We all regret it, but we must accept it as one of the conditions under which we carry on this fight.
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Fri 14 Nov, 2014 04:17 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Speaking about France ....
"Today", the French paper Le petit Parsien is quite confident that the French will be successful ...

http://i61.tinypic.com/zv3qsj.jpg

... with the help of the allies

http://i62.tinypic.com/2qve3us.jpg
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sat 15 Nov, 2014 06:51 am
@Walter Hinteler,
The frontpage of the Frankfurter Zeitung 2nd morning edition is just and only about the "Kampf um Ypern" (battle for Ypres)

http://i62.tinypic.com/13z2uqx.jpg

[Sorry that I miss-named the paper earlier: it's only past 1945, that it got the name "Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung" but before that it always was the "Frankfurter Zeitung"]


Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Sat 15 Nov, 2014 06:52 am
@Walter Hinteler,
This Sunday paper from Keokuk, Iowa, sums up the latest news about the war on various places, but the main headline on the frontpage is interesting

http://i62.tinypic.com/biqq9i.jpghttp://i57.tinypic.com/30aw391.jpg


 

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