Miller
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 May, 2014 08:57 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Today in the USA, it almost impossible to tell a Jewish person from a Christian,at least by their last name.

For example, if a Jewish couple gives their son a first name of "Kelly" would you think the boy was Irish Catholic if the parents never mentioned either their ethnicity or religion? Or would you think that the child was Jewish?

And what about converts either through ritual or marriage , to Judaism. What does their last names of Lee, Lung, Loo, Maloney, Howe, tell you about their past/present religion?

Nothing...

Today, Americans are such a mixture, who really knows what anyone really is?
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 May, 2014 09:06 am
@Miller,
I didn't write anything about Jewish and/or Christian names, be it first names or family names.

I wasn't referring to anything in the USA as well.

I was just explaining the German family name Meier (and the various possibilities how it's written).

0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 May, 2014 10:19 am
@Miller,
Miller wrote:

Today in the USA, it almost impossible to tell a Jewish person from a Christian,at least by their last name.

For example, if a Jewish couple gives their son a first name of "Kelly" would you think the boy was Irish Catholic if the parents never mentioned either their ethnicity or religion? Or would you think that the child was Jewish?

And what about converts either through ritual or marriage , to Judaism. What does their last names of Lee, Lung, Loo, Maloney, Howe, tell you about their past/present religion?

Nothing...

Today, Americans are such a mixture, who really knows what anyone really is?


However, since I like to watch Wheel of Fortune, I do believe that when a girl from middle America has the first name of Rebecca, one might be correct to say she comes from a Protestant family, since in my observations few Catholics give their children Old Testament names. And, it does warm the cockles of my heart.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 May, 2014 10:44 am
@Foofie,
Foofie wrote:
since in my observations few Catholics give their children Old Testament names. And, it does warm the cockles of my heart.
Rebekka Ar Rayès is a Catholic saint.
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 May, 2014 10:50 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

Foofie wrote:
since in my observations few Catholics give their children Old Testament names. And, it does warm the cockles of my heart.
Rebekka Ar Rayès is a Catholic saint.


The context of my point was middle America, U.S.A.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 May, 2014 10:56 am
@Foofie,
Foofie wrote:
The context of my point was middle America, U.S.A.
I'd thought that Catholic saints are saints for the Catholic Church everywhere.

But of course, I can be wrong and this one or others are excluded for Catholics in the U.S.A., America.
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 May, 2014 11:03 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

Foofie wrote:
The context of my point was middle America, U.S.A.
I'd thought that Catholic saints are saints for the Catholic Church everywhere.

But of course, I can be wrong and this one or others are excluded for Catholics in the U.S.A., America.


I am talking sociology. In my observations certain first names are not often used by Catholic parents. In other words a Jacob can be Protestant; not Catholic, in my opinion. It just has to do with letting society know that a child comes from one faith or another, in my opinion.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 May, 2014 11:19 am
@Foofie,
Foofie wrote:
I am talking sociology. In my observations certain first names are not often used by Catholic parents. In other words a Jacob can be Protestant; not Catholic, in my opinion. It just has to do with letting society know that a child comes from one faith or another, in my opinion.
Jacobus/Jacob/Jakob/Jacques/Giacomo etc etc is and has been a common name, by Catholics as well as Protestants.
Actually, due to the two apostles of that name, and nearly a dozen of Saints until the late Medieval age, it's more Catholic than Protestant.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 May, 2014 11:48 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:
Actually, due to the two apostles of that name, and nearly a dozen of Saints until the late Medieval age, it's more Catholic than Protestant.
Due to Luther and the other leading Evangelicals, the biblical prenoms became more in use than before.
However, when you look at the names in registers, it was equally between Protestants and Catholics, with regional differences about the "favourites".
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 May, 2014 02:14 pm
I've never heard a Catholic call their son, Moses. They might call the boy, MO however.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 May, 2014 02:31 pm
@Miller,
Actually, I never ask parents about their religion.

Last year, Moses was ranked on number 56 of favourite names for German boys.

Miller
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 May, 2014 02:44 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

Actually, I never ask parents about their religion.

Last year, Moses was ranked on number 56 of favourite names for German boys.




Where most of these boys, Catholics?
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 May, 2014 02:47 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

Actually, I never ask parents about their religion.



In the USA, among the upper middle class and the very wealthy, religion is a common topic when the families and off spring discuss marriage. This is very true, when the couple is an interfaith one.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 May, 2014 02:50 pm
@Miller,
Walter Hinteler wrote:
Actually, I never ask parents about their religion.
Religion can be added on the official formulas at registry offices here, but can't be published.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 May, 2014 02:56 pm
@Miller,
Less than 25% of marriages are later (= after the actual marriage) done again in churches here. (The number is from 2008 - I suppose, it's a lot now.)
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Sat 31 May, 2014 07:22 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

Foofie wrote:
I am talking sociology. In my observations certain first names are not often used by Catholic parents. In other words a Jacob can be Protestant; not Catholic, in my opinion. It just has to do with letting society know that a child comes from one faith or another, in my opinion.
Jacobus/Jacob/Jakob/Jacques/Giacomo etc etc is and has been a common name, by Catholics as well as Protestants.
Actually, due to the two apostles of that name, and nearly a dozen of Saints until the late Medieval age, it's more Catholic than Protestant.


Your points might not be applicable in American society. That's what I talk about. I am not a citizen of the world. Only a citizen of the U.S.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sat 31 May, 2014 09:55 pm
@Foofie,
You didn't make it clear that you were only talking about the US. It's not fair to jump on him after he provides a legitimate answer about that name.

From Wiki.
Quote:
Jacob (name)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jacob
Isaac Blessing Jacob - Govert Flinck.jpg
Isaac Blessing Jacob, Govert Flinck, 1638. The name Jacob comes from the Biblical story of Jacob's birth where he came out holding the heel of his twin brother, Esau.
Pronunciation /ˈdʒeɪkəb/
Gender Male
Origin
Word/Name derived from Late Latin Iacobus, from Greek Ἰάκωβος Iakobos, from Hebrew יַעֲקֹב (Yaʿqob, Yaʿaqov, Yaʿăqōḇ)
Meaning "seizing by the heel", "supplanting"
Other names
Related names James, Jakob (Afrikaans, Danish, Dutch, German, Norwegian and Swedish), Jake, Jack, Jakobi (Albanian and Estonian), Yakub (Arabic), Yakup (Turkish),
Look up Jacob in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Jacob is a common male first name and a less well-known surname. From 1999 through 2012, Jacob has been the most popular baby name for boys in United States.[1]
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 31 May, 2014 11:04 pm
@Foofie,
Foofie wrote:
Your points might not be applicable in American society. That's what I talk about. I am not a citizen of the world. Only a citizen of the U.S.
Whatever you are: you wrote about "Catholic parents".
And opposite to your knowledge: there are a few of those living outside your box.
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Jun, 2014 07:56 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

Walter Hinteler wrote:
Actually, I never ask parents about their religion.
Religion can be added on the official formulas at registry offices here, but can't be published.


Religion is not mentioned on birth certificates in the US. Race used to be mentioned ( White or Black, etc ) on birth certificates, but not longer is.

No mention today about whether the baby was born out of wedlock, today.
0 Replies
 
MarkC
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Jun, 2014 04:29 pm
I just read the newspapers yesterday and found out that Steve Ballmer the Jewish former CEO of Microsoft was going to buy the LA Clippers from another Jew Donald Sterling. So this basketball team is going to change hands from one rich Jew to another rich Jew. When does it all end? This is even more proof that the Jews control the new media. How come the news media isn't telling anybody about this? The reason why Ballmer had to step down as CEO is that he destroyed Microsoft so the Jewish owned Apple and Google (Sergy Brin) could take over the Computer world.
 

 
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