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Roasted Kale

 
 
chai2
 
Reply Wed 5 Mar, 2014 01:21 pm
Yummy.

discuss.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 6 • Views: 2,188 • Replies: 30
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farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Mar, 2014 02:04 pm
@chai2,
I sked you over there what did you do to make it?? Share the reci[pe. (If it has anything that includes mayonnaise or Miracle WHip, forget it)
0 Replies
 
PUNKEY
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Mar, 2014 03:46 pm
Kale seems to be "in" right now. So is cauliflower.
Glad they moved on from brussel sprouts. (Actually, I love them roasted and served with pork ribs)
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Mar, 2014 03:57 pm
@chai2,
Is kale Texan slang for lamb?

Must be, 'cos otherwise you'd be talking about sticking rabbit food in the oven.....

No...

Eh?
0 Replies
 
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Mar, 2014 04:09 pm
@chai2,
Sounds as though it has possibilities...but I gotta recommend something sorta, kinda, like it...that I have made and think is super.

Escarole (roasted in oven or fried in heavy pan) with olive oil, garlic, and pinole nuts.

Yummy, da yummady!

Several recipes in Google...but it really is just escarole, garlic, olive oil, and pinoles.

You'll love it.

I'll try something with Kale...and let you know what I think.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Mar, 2014 04:29 pm
@Frank Apisa,
Escarole.

Now you lot are pulling my leg. That's not a real word,

Escarole indeed.

chai2
 
  2  
Reply Wed 5 Mar, 2014 06:15 pm
Frank, I've only had escarole in soup, and didn't care for it.

It's enough like kale though that I'm thinking I'd like it that way.

farmer, just made it really simple, just a mixing bowl 3/4's full of already washed and torn up kale pieces, hand mix with a little good olive oil, and just a pinch of kosher salt. Be careful, the first batch I made yesterday was too salty, and I thought I'd put hardly any salt in it.

Just put on a cookie pan at maybe 275 degrees for 25 minutes. I didn't want to make it a project.

Nice and crunchy for snacking, light yet filling.

I'll branch out and put some garlic powder or chili powder and see how I like that.

I like mostly all roasted vegetables. Carrots, brussel sprouts, onion, beets etc.
I'll mix them all the above together and roast, but at a higher temp than I did the kale, and for longer. If you put the kale in those vegetables, it would just burn up.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_s--n1TR94Vs/S3OMEXER5_I/AAAAAAAANmQ/-CUkDMwv3TY/s400/kale-chips-400x400-kalynskitchen.jpg
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Mar, 2014 06:31 pm
@chai2,
chai2 wrote:

Frank, I've only had escarole in soup, and didn't care for it.

It's enough like kale though that I'm thinking I'd like it that way.

farmer, just made it really simple, just a mixing bowl 3/4's full of already washed and torn up kale pieces, hand mix with a little good olive oil, and just a pinch of kosher salt. Be careful, the first batch I made yesterday was too salty, and I thought I'd put hardly any salt in it.

Just put on a cookie pan at maybe 275 degrees for 25 minutes. I didn't want to make it a project.

Nice and crunchy for snacking, light yet filling.

I'll branch out and put some garlic powder or chili powder and see how I like that.

I like mostly all roasted vegetables. Carrots, brussel sprouts, onion, beets etc.
I'll mix them all the above together and roast, but at a higher temp than I did the kale, and for longer. If you put the kale in those vegetables, it would just burn up.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_s--n1TR94Vs/S3OMEXER5_I/AAAAAAAANmQ/-CUkDMwv3TY/s400/kale-chips-400x400-kalynskitchen.jpg


Not sure if it is the white hair or what...but I have gotten to the point where I absolutely crave vegetables. All kinds...and those green thingys, like escarole or kale. I also have become a great fan of bok choy...which I make at least once a week with ginger, garlic, and a bit of soy sauce. But the veggies have been very big...and I have started doing something I've never done before. I put veggies in with my rice...I dice up a mushroom or two...saute it...a bit of corn, peas, some sliced carrots.

Oh, man. That is living!
0 Replies
 
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Mar, 2014 06:32 pm
@Lordyaswas,
Lordyaswas wrote:

Escarole.

Now you lot are pulling my leg. That's not a real word,

Escarole indeed.




Well...you have got to pronounce it Italian style...schcadole!

I love it...in salads, soups, and as a veggie.
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Mar, 2014 01:43 am
One or three serious questions come out of all this looking at American recipes over the past couple of days.

What the hell is kosher salt?
Is it just what it says it is?
How does its taste differ from non kosher salt?

I have seen many kosher products in my time, but never salt, yet it seems to get frequent mention in recipes from across the pond.

Can't you 'Mercans get your hands on ordinary salt?
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Mar, 2014 04:50 am
@Lordyaswas,
Kosher salt is also called "koshering salt". Its not blessed its just made without any additives. Its usually precipitated from a mine solution or a brine and, because its agitated , it makes flat plates rather than cubes. I think kosher salt is uswd for processes that involve making kosher meats. Most kosher meats are waay too salty for me.

"Hollow salts " are used in soft pretzels by the Auntie Anne Company. (manufacturer of great Amish -like soft pretzels). They make a type pf salt that is a hollow pyramidal crystal that, because of its shape and hollowness, has so much surface area it just EXPLODES in your
mouth with a blast of salty goodness.
Most Amerikans have high blood pressure


We have tons of specialty salts , they are mostly marketing bullshit because Merkins are suckers with food. We will buy anything that says gourmet or artisanal on the label.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Mar, 2014 05:31 am
@farmerman,
Fascinating. Thanks.

Just as a matter of interest, I never, ever use salt in cooking, apart from a tiny sprinklette when I cook rice.
Obviously stock cubes contain it and tinned stuff has varying amounts, but apart from that, nope.
The only time I may use it on food, is maybe some on my chips (fries).
Most of my family is the same.
There's no medical reason for it, just a bit of fear really, at what salt can do.


I always use herbs, spices and pepper instead of salt, and can't remember the last time we bought salt, apart from the stuff used to melt the ice on our path in winter.

Interestingly, if we eat a ready meal, shop pizza or a takeaway (Chinese, Indian etc), we all end up with a major thirst.

Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Thu 6 Mar, 2014 06:16 am
I don't like escarole - we "grew" them in a special room in the cellar, when I was child.

As for kale - I just like it the traditional way: steamed in bouillon with onions and lard, served with the special kale-sausage (I prefer the smoked version) and fried potatoes.

There's a saying here that you only can eat kale after the first really frosty days. If that were true, I had had to wait until next winter.
0 Replies
 
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Mar, 2014 07:07 am
@farmerman,
I've been using sea salt a lot lately...mostly because if put on late in the process...it imparts a bit of tactile sensation that I enjoy...a bit of crispiness almost.

I never use it in salads, but I make oven baked cod filet...that I always sprinkle with sea salt before serving.
Frank Apisa
 
  2  
Reply Thu 6 Mar, 2014 07:10 am
While I can understand the notion of kosher salt for people who subscribe to religious dietary restrictions, it always seems to me to be a bit of pretension when called for in a recipe.

Sorta like when I was a bartender...and someone called for a back-shelf rum...and then had it with coke!
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Mar, 2014 07:44 am
@Lordyaswas,
As I recall from my trips to UK and Ireland, you folks don't seem to use much flavoring in much of your food. s I recall from the Dublin hotel, they didn't have salt shakers at the table unless you asked and then theyd give you these little salt dishes into which youd dip your fingers to get a "pinch'
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Thu 6 Mar, 2014 07:46 am
@Frank Apisa,
We do about the same thing, salt at the end and make sure you can get a crunch. We also have all our pepper shakers on "BIG GRIND". Most of our pepper corns are just barely wounded.
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Mar, 2014 07:54 am
@farmerman,
Not flavouring as such after the event, personally speaking. I tend to spice mine up as I cook, and have to tone it down sometimes as I like hot and spicy when left to my own devices.
Having said that, I sit in amazement sometimes when a person just picks up a salt pot and shakes and shakes all over his or her meal, before even tasting it!
Nearly every Scot I've met, and I've met a few, all seem to put tons of salt on their food. I have a Geordie side to the family as well, and they're the same.
Irish food, when I was over there, was on the whole, very plain home cooking, but it was stuff you could certainly pack away quite easily and it would see you through a hard day's toil. Almost like piles of comfort food when cooked well, but not really scoring high on spice or seasoning.

Is it normal over there for people to swamp their meals in salt when the plate arrives on the table?

Maybe you're all Scots or Geordies. Very Happy
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Mar, 2014 08:17 am
Kosher salt is also larger flakes than standard table salt. It won't fit through a lot of shaker openings.

It's only 'kosher' in the sense that a Rabbi said, hey, this was produced in a factory without pork! Plus, as farmerman said, it's also because it's used for koshering kills (which also have to be kosher slaughtered, BTW). But otherwise, no, it's not necessary for a kosher diet at all.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Mar, 2014 08:46 am
@jespah,
S'funny, jesp. Over here, certainly in London, 'kosher' can be used to mean genuine, legal, legitimate.

"Want a brand new Omega watch? Only £200!"

"Is it kosher?"
 

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