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Roasted Kale

 
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Mar, 2014 08:48 am
@jespah,
jespah wrote:

Kosher salt is also larger flakes than standard table salt. It won't fit through a lot of shaker openings.

It's only 'kosher' in the sense that a Rabbi said, hey, this was produced in a factory without pork! Plus, as farmerman said, it's also because it's used for koshering kills (which also have to be kosher slaughtered, BTW). But otherwise, no, it's not necessary for a kosher diet at all.


I like it because of those larger flakes, and I don't put it in a salt shaker.

I'm no gourmet, but somehow I can taste a difference, and I like those larger flakes. I feel I have more control over them in cooking. The amount I put into the kale was literally a pinch.

I use little salt, and can't remember the last time I salted something once it was on my plate, either at home or in a restaurant.

This box of kosher salt will last me Years. I'm going to need to start a new box within a month or 2. I'll try to remember to write the date on the box.

http://www.liveandletdi.com/.a/6a00d8341c50e153ef01156e80015b970c-pi



As far coarseness lordy, it's (to me) somewhere between regular table salt, and sea salt.

http://static.squarespace.com/static/52017273e4b08b065902ad93/52d70a9fe4b04a2626dd8f41/52d70aa1e4b04a2626dd9c0d/1341868802433/201207subbingsaltsall4.jpg
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Mar, 2014 08:49 am
@Lordyaswas,
Lordyaswas wrote:

S'funny, jesp. Over here, certainly in London, 'kosher' can be used to mean genuine, legal, legitimate.

"Want a brand new Omega watch? Only £200!"

"Is it kosher?"


Same here too.

As in "that doesn't sound kosher" Wink

0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Mar, 2014 09:35 am
@Lordyaswas,
Quote:
I sit in amazement sometimes when a person just picks up a salt pot and shakes and shakes all over his or her meal, before even tasting it!


Its that way in the south and at "diners" all over the US. people will get served something and, like a sock puppet, reach for a salt shaker and shake. One of my late partners, whenever we were out in the fields of the west, would always order LIVER and ONIONS (He was from Karala India as a transplant) and, while he was talking and before he even tasted his food, would shake salt on his dinner and talk. Sometimes Id say JEZUS Christ Manny youre gonna be dyin of thirst once we get to the (wherever)
Instead, Manny died at 53 of a massive stroke .
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Mar, 2014 09:43 am
@farmerman,
I know, it always amazes me when someone salts their food without tasting it.

I remember my parents having a bbq when I was a kid, and a man they'd invited, got his burger, took off the top of the bun, and shook salt on the meat until you could see the white of the salt.

When he was done, his 12 year old son took the shaker from his dad, and did the same to his burger.

I sat there, goggle eyed.

Like father, like son. Just a habit. Oh, and this wasn't in the South.
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Mar, 2014 12:07 pm
That's a lotta salt. Oh yeah, we use the term 'kosher' to mean 'legit', too. I was raised in a kosher home. 4 sets o' dishes and tableware.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Mar, 2014 12:09 pm
@jespah,
Why 4?

Were 2 sets for holidays and the other 2 for everyday?
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Mar, 2014 12:10 pm
@chai2,
2 sets for Passover.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Mar, 2014 12:13 pm
@jespah,
Is that when you dance and smash them all?


Hang on.....that's the Greeks. Sorry.

Carry on...
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Mar, 2014 12:40 pm
@jespah,
ok, this might be a dumb question jes.

I have dishes of course, but I also order from Amazon plates made of sugar cane that are compostable. I'll buy a whole case of 500 and it lasts a long while. They're about 9 or 10 cents a plate. They are on the order of chinet plates. (I even use them for makeshift cutting boards)
It saves a lot of washing up and hot water.

Could you just use those plates for your meat and milk, and not have to worry about keeping 2 sets clean every single day?
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Mar, 2014 01:09 pm
@chai2,
My folks have used disposable plates, if that's what you mean. Assuming that the factory the plates were made in is Rabbi-approved (Mashgiach-approved, if you wanna get technical), then that's fine.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Mar, 2014 02:09 pm
A guest just came over, and ate half my newly out of the oven batch of kale!

He said "it kinda draws you in"
0 Replies
 
 

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