0
   

An English/Math Riddle

 
 
Tommy
 
Reply Fri 18 Oct, 2002 04:04 pm
A man died and in his will he left $10,000 to be divided between his sons. How much did each

get
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 4,093 • Replies: 6
No top replies

 
Craven de Kere
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Oct, 2002 05:50 pm
I think the answer

you are looking for is 5,000. But I don't agree with you about the between/among rule.

I'll quote the

Merriam-Webster's examples here.

Quote:
There is a persistent but unfounded notion that between can be

used only of two items and that among must be used for more than two. Between has been used of more than two since Old

English; it is especially appropriate to denote a one-to-one relationship, regardless of the number of items. It can be used

when the number is unspecified <economic cooperation between nations>, when more than two are enumerated <between

you and me and the lamppost> <partitioned between Austria, Prussia, and Russia -- Nathaniel Benchley>, and even when

only one item is mentioned (but repetition is implied) <pausing between every sentence to rap the floor -- George

Eliot>. Among is more appropriate where the emphasis is on distribution rather than individual relationships

<discontent among the peasants>. When among is automatically chosen for more than two, English idiom may be strained

<a worthy book that nevertheless falls among many stools -- John Simon> <the author alternates among mod slang,

clich├ęs and quotes from literary giants -- A. H. Johnston>.


I'm not looking for a logomachy

though. Grammar isn't absolute and it was a good riddle!
0 Replies
 
Tommy
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Oct, 2002 09:34 am
I use The New

Oxford English Dictionary and where, as I see it, the words "divide" and "between" are used together in a sentence with one

subject then the combination of both indicates two.

My sister was given this in a transfer examination from Primary to

Secondary School. She chose 2 because it was the only sensible answer.
0 Replies
 
Craven de Kere
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Oct, 2002 10:18 am
Doh! I hadn't even

thought about divide! Embarrassed
0 Replies
 
Pharon
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Oct, 2002 08:38 pm
you had me..
0 Replies
 
Anonymous
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Oct, 2002 04:48 pm
Tommy wrote:
I use The New

Oxford English Dictionary and where, as I see it, the words "divide" and "between" are used together in a sentence with one

subject then the combination of both indicates two.

My sister was given this in a transfer examination from Primary to

Secondary School. She chose 2 because it was the only sensible answer.



Hi Tommy

well blow me over with a feather if they give that in Srcondary School. I spent some time thinking about it and still over Craven's input could come up with anything....
I am scared to ask but ....... give mr another. Shocked Very Happy Very Happy
0 Replies
 
Rae
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Oct, 2002 10:46 pm
Oh my goodness.....Is that Douglas? Wow!

Long time, no see.....
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Alternative Einstein's riddle answer - Discussion by cedor
Urgent !!! Puzzle / Riddle...Plz helpp - Question by zuzusheryl
Bottle - Question by Megha
"The World's Hardest Riddle" - Discussion by maxlovesmarie
Hard Riddle - Question by retsgned
Riddle Time - Question by Teddy Isaiah
riddle me this (easy) - Question by gree012
Riddle - Question by georgio7
Trick Question I think! - Question by sophocles
Answer my riddle - Question by DanDMan52
 
  1. Forums
  2. » An English/Math Riddle
Copyright © 2022 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.04 seconds on 12/01/2022 at 12:20:33